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3-D Human Skin Maps Aid Study of Relationships Between Molecules, Microbes and Environment

March 31, 2015 4:39 pm | by University of Calif, San Diego | News | Comments

Researchers at the University of California, San Diego Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences used information collected from hundreds of skin swabs to produce three-dimensional maps of molecular and microbial variations across the body. 

Report: Diversity of New England Plant Life is Threatened

March 27, 2015 10:42 am | by Bob Salsberg, Associated Press | News | Comments

The report studied more than 3,500 known plant species and determined that 22 percent are...

Two Exotic Termites Find Love in Florida

March 27, 2015 10:34 am | by Jennifer Kay, Associated Press | News | Comments

Two particularly hungry, exotic termite species apparently have found love halfway around the...

Czechs Deploy Wild Horses from Britain to Save Biodiversity

March 25, 2015 2:37 pm | by Karel Janicek, Associated Press | News | Comments

A herd of 14 wild mares from Britain's Exmoor National Park were moved in January to the former...

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Researchers Find Fossil of 'Super Salamander' Species

March 25, 2015 2:25 pm | by The Associated Press | News | Comments

The species grew up to two meters (six feet) in length and lived in lakes and rivers.

Oldest Homo Fossil Implies Humans Created by Climate Change

March 25, 2015 9:39 am | by Cynthia Fox, Science Writer | Articles | Comments

On an East African hill somewhere in “Afar,” a stone’s throw from “Awash,” two sections of a large detached jawbone grinned brokenly at Ethiopian Arizona State University (ASU) graduate student Chalachew Seyoum. The pieces were just lying there, so the student picked them up and brought them together. They fit “perfectly,” he said.

Spread of Infectious Diseases Could be Linked to Changing Climate

March 19, 2015 10:13 am | by Joe Shust, Editor, Continuity Insights | Articles | Comments

Could a changing climate and changing environments have an impact on the spread of infectious diseases?  At least one zoologist thinks so.

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Exposure to Endocrine Disruptors During Pregnancy Affects Brain Two Generations Later

March 6, 2015 10:26 am | by The Endocrine Society | News | Comments

Prenatal exposure to low doses of the environmental contaminants polychlorinated biphenyls, or PCBs, change the developing brain in an area involved in metabolism, and some effects are apparent even two generations later, a new study finds.   

DNA Tool Helping Biologists Find Elusive or Invasive Species

March 3, 2015 4:18 pm | by Phuong Lee, Associated Press | News | Comments

When salmon, salamanders or other aquatic animals poop or shed skin cells, they leave behind traces of their DNA in the water, like clues left behind at a crime scene.               

A Mollusk of a Different Stripe

February 26, 2015 10:16 am | by Jennifer Chu, MIT | News | Comments

Optical features embedded in marine shells may help develop responsive, transparent displays.                            

Antarctica: Mystery Continent Holds Key to Mankind's Future

February 24, 2015 9:23 am | by Luis Andres Henao and Seth Borenstein, Associated Press | News | Comments

Earth's past, present and future come together here on the northern peninsula of Antarctica, the wildest, most desolate and mysterious of its continents.                  

2 Dead, Over 170 Potentially Exposed in 'Superbug' Outbreak

February 19, 2015 11:21 am | by Robert Jablon, Associated Press | News | Comments

Contaminated medical instruments are suspected in a "superbug" outbreak at a Los Angeles hospital that has infected at least seven patients, two of whom died. More than 170 others may have been exposed to the antibiotic-resistant bacteria.   

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Plants Survive Mass Extinctions Better Than Animals

February 18, 2015 12:33 pm | by University of Gothenburg | News | Comments

At least 5 mass extinction events have profoundly changed the history of life on Earth. But a new study led by researchers at the University of Gothenburg shows that plants have been very resilient to those events.  

Tiny Oregon Minnow is First Fish Taken Off Endangered List

February 17, 2015 3:51 pm | by Jeff Barnard, Associated Press | News | Comments

A tiny minnow that lives only in backwaters in Oregon's Willamette Valley is the first fish to be formally removed from Endangered Species Act protection because it is no longer in danger of extinction.          

Australian Project to Combat Myanmar Snake Deaths

February 17, 2015 9:54 am | by The Associated Press | News | Comments

Australia is funding a three-year, 2.3 million Australian dollar ($1.8 million) project that will aid snakebite victims in Myanmar by upgrading care facilities and the quality and availability of antivenom.         

Beavers Show Way to Improve Enamel

February 13, 2015 3:57 pm | by Washington University in St. Louis | News | Comments

Beavers don’t brush their teeth, and they don’t drink fluoridated water, but a new study reports beavers do have protection against tooth decay built into the chemical structure of their teeth.           

Nearly 200 Pilot Whales Stranded on New Zealand Beach

February 13, 2015 3:33 pm | by The Associated Press | News | Comments

Nearly 200 pilot whales stranded themselves on New Zealand's South Island on Friday, and hordes of rescuers rushed to the remote area in a bid to guide them back to sea.               

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Apes Prefer the Glass Half Full

February 12, 2015 2:27 pm | by Duke University | News | Comments

Humans aren’t the only species to be influenced by spin. Our closest primate relatives are susceptible, too.                         

Oil Drilling Banned in Artic Area That Attracts Walrus

February 12, 2015 2:12 pm | by Dan Joling, Associated Press | News | Comments

A plateau on the Arctic Ocean floor, where thousands of Pacific walrus gather to feed and raise pups, has received new protections from the Obama administration that recognize it as a biological hot spot and mark it off-limits to future oil drilling.  

Sequence of Genetic Mutations Determines How Cancer Behaves

February 12, 2015 10:15 am | News | Comments

Most of the genetic mutations that cause cancer result from environmental ‘damage’ (for example, through smoking or as a result of over-exposure to sunlight) or from spontaneous errors as cells divide. 

Survival for Some Endangered Species Hinges on 'Frozen Zoo'

February 12, 2015 9:47 am | by Associated Press | News | Comments

Whenever an endangered animal dies at the San Diego Zoo, researchers race out, regardless of the hour, to remove its sperm or eggs, maybe a bit of ear or eyeball, and carefully freeze the cells in liquid nitrogen.

Babies Identify Complex Social Situations

February 10, 2015 5:02 pm | by University of Missouri-Columbia | News | Comments

In the social world, people constantly gather information through visual cues that are used to evaluate others and interact. A new study from researchers at the University of Missouri determined that babies can make sense of complex social situations, and that they expect people to behave appropriately.     

Coral Snake Venom Reveals Unique Route to Lethality

February 10, 2015 9:34 am | by Johns Hopkins University | News | Comments

A vial of rare snake venom refused to give up its secret formula for lethality; its toxins had no effect on the proteins that most venoms target.                   

Cow Immune System Inspires Potential New Therapies

February 6, 2015 12:19 pm | by The Scripps Research Institute | News | Comments

Scientists have developed a potential new therapy based on an unlikely model: immune molecules from cows.                          

Brazil Scientists Fear Golden Mussel Threat to Amazon River

February 6, 2015 12:14 pm | by Jenny Barchfield - Associated Press | News | Comments

The world's mightiest waterway, the Amazon River, is threatened by the most diminutive of foes - a tiny mussel invading from China.                      

Fewer Viral Relics May Be Due to a Less Bloody Evolutionary History

February 4, 2015 2:36 pm | by University of Oxford | News | Comments

Humans have fewer remnants of viral DNA in their genes compared to other mammals.                              

Evolutionary Explanation of Walking

February 4, 2015 10:41 am | by Peter Reuell, Harvard News | News | Comments

For decades, scientists have recognized the upright posture exhibited by chimpanzees, gorillas, and humans as a key feature separating the “great apes” from other primates, but a host of questions about the evolution of that posture — particularly how and when it emerged — have long gone unanswered.

High-Speed Images Capture How Raindrops Spread Plant Pathogens

February 4, 2015 9:14 am | by MIT | News | Comments

Farmers have long noted a correlation between rainstorms and disease outbreaks among plants. Fungal parasites known as “rust” can grow particularly rampant following rain events, eating away at the leaves of wheat and potentially depleting crop harvests.

Skin based Immunity Secrets Revealed

February 3, 2015 1:46 pm | by University of Melbourne | News | Comments

A team of international scientists has discovered a new mechanism by which immune cells in the skin function act as the body's 'border control', revealing how these cells sense whether lipid or fat-like molecules might indicate the presence of foreign invaders.

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