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10 Up-and-Coming Healthcare Medical Innovations

December 17, 2014 5:32 pm | by Christina Jakubowski, Managing Editor | Articles | Comments

The Cleveland Clinic recently unveiled their annual Top 10 Medical Innovations for 2015– a list that casts an optimistic light on up-and-coming healthcare advances that may reach consumers next year.                                       

Reading Leaves a Dramatic Imprint on the Brain

December 17, 2014 4:23 pm | by Cynthia Fox, Science Writer | Articles | Comments

A good book recreates the world so robustly that it activates some of the same brain regions...

Genes Tell Story of Birdsong and Human Speech

December 12, 2014 9:28 am | News | Comments

After a massive international effort to sequence and compare the entire genomes of 48...

Merging for Cures: GPI, RMF to Combine

December 11, 2014 3:26 pm | by Christina Jakubowski, Managing Editor | News | Comments

The Genetics Policy Institute (GPI) and the Regenerative Medicine Foundation (RMF) will...

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Brain Inflammation a Hallmark of Autism

December 11, 2014 8:30 am | News | Comments

While many different combinations of genetic traits can cause autism, brains affected by autism share a pattern of ramped-up immune responses, an analysis of data from autopsied human brains revealed.               

Worm's Mental GPS Helps Them Find Food

December 10, 2014 12:08 pm | News | Comments

Scientists have developed a mathematical theory–based on roundworm foraging that predicts how animals decide to switch from localized to very broad searching.                          

10 Emerging Ethical Dilemmas in Science and Technology

December 8, 2014 12:47 pm | News | Comments

The John J. Reilly Center for Science, Technology, and Values at the University of Notre Dame has released its annual list of emerging ethical dilemmas and policy issues in science and technology for 2015.             

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Smoking Linked to Loss of Y Chromosome in Men

December 5, 2014 12:32 pm | News | Comments

In a new study, researchers demonstrated an association between smoking and loss of the Y chromosome in blood cells. The researchers have previously shown that loss of the Y chromosome is linked to cancer.          

Traffic Jams Can Hurt the Heart

December 2, 2014 11:58 am | News | Comments

Anyone who has experienced Los Angeles gridlock likely can attest that traffic may cause one's blood pressure to rise. But researchers have found that, beyond the aggravation caused by fellow drivers, traffic-related air pollution presents serious heart health risks.

New Studies Show Anxiety, Depression, Guilt Harm the Brain

November 26, 2014 8:30 am | by Bioscience Technology Staff | Articles | Comments

Two studies in recent weeks have found that anxiety, depression and guilt can physically change and damage the brain from preschool through adulthood.                            

Google's Latest: A Spoon That Steadies Tremors

November 26, 2014 8:30 am | by By Martha Mendoza - AP National Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

Google is throwing its money, brain power and technology at the humble spoon. But these spoons are a bit more than your basic utensil: Using hundreds of algorithms, they allow people with essential tremors and Parkinson's disease to eat without spilling.

Cloning Pioneer Proposes Global Network of iPS Cell Banks

November 25, 2014 2:57 pm | by Cynthia Fox, Science Writer | Articles | Comments

Ian Wilmut, father of the cloned Dolly the Sheep, is now proposing to father a global Induced Pluripotent Stem (iPS) cell handbook— to go with a proposed new global network of IPS cell haplobanks.               

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Schizophrenia May be Triggered by Excess Protein

November 24, 2014 11:18 am | News | Comments

A gene associated with schizophrenia plays a role in brain development and may help to explain the biological process of the disease, according to new research.                          

Total Recall: The Science Behind It

November 14, 2014 10:20 am | News | Comments

Is it possible to change the amount of information the brain can store? Maybe, according to a new international study, which identified a molecule that puts a brake on brain processing and when removed, brain function and memory recall is improved.

The Backwards Brain

November 13, 2014 10:01 am | News | Comments

Humans, like many animals, are accustomed to seeing objects pass behind us as we go forward. Moving backwards feels unnatural. In a new study, scientists reveal that moving forward actually trains the brain to perceive the world normally.    

Revolutionary New Microscope: Real-time Movies of Molecules

November 12, 2014 8:30 am | by Cynthia Fox, Science Writer | Articles | Comments

A new microscope, using a new form of the much-hailed light sheet-based fluorescence microscopy (LSFM), makes visible— via stunning movies— countless biological processes once deemed utterly invisible: sub-cellular activity.       

Controlling Genes with Thoughts

November 12, 2014 8:30 am | News | Comments

Researchers have developed the first gene network to be operated via brainwaves. Depending on the user’s thoughts, it can produce various amounts of a desired molecule.                       

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Long-term Marijuana Use Affects Brain Function, Structure

November 11, 2014 10:37 am | News | Comments

Researchers for the first time comprehensively describe existing abnormalities in brain function and structure of long-term marijuana users with multiple MRI techniques.                      

Stem Cell Transplants for Parkinson’s Edging Closer

November 7, 2014 11:47 am | Videos | Comments

A major breakthrough in the development of stem cell-derived brain cells has put researchers on a firm path towards the first-ever stem cell transplantations in people with Parkinson’s disease.                 

DNA Study Dates Eurasian Split from East Asians

November 6, 2014 9:55 pm | by The Associated Press | News | Comments

The human populations now predominant in Eurasia and East Asia probably split between 36,200 and 45,000 years ago, according to a study released Thursday.                           

Study Replicates Human Brain-to-brain Connection

November 6, 2014 1:03 pm | Videos | Comments

Researchers have successfully replicated a direct brain-to-brain connection between pairs of people as part of a scientific study following the team’s initial demonstration a year ago.                   

Researchers Reconstruct Early Stages of Embryo Development

November 4, 2014 12:36 pm | Videos | Comments

Researchers have managed to reconstruct the early stage of mammalian development using embryonic stem cells, showing that a critical mass of cells is needed for the cells to being self-organizing into the correct structure for an embryo to form. 

Alzheimer's Development Theory Debunked

November 3, 2014 1:22 pm | News | Comments

New research dramatically alters the prevailing theory of how Alzheimer’s disease develops. The research also helps explains why some people with plaque buildup in their brains don’t develop dementia, and shows the potential of a cancer drug to combat the disease.

Special Report: Imagine Science Film Festival

October 31, 2014 3:00 pm | by Cynthia Fox, Science Writer | Articles | Comments

One of the enduring images of this year’s Imagine Science Film Festival, held in New York on Oct. 17 to 24, was that of a girl in a black abeyya lugging a giant white telescope up a hill, escaping her cruel Iranian life to lose herself in the stars in the film “Sepideh.” 

Algae Virus Found in Healthy Human Throats

October 28, 2014 1:51 pm | News | Comments

Scientists have discovered an algae virus never before seen in the throats of healthy people that may subtly alter a range of cognitive functions including visual processing and spatial orientation in those who harbor it.         

45,000-year-old Modern Human DNA Sequenced

October 23, 2014 11:46 am | News | Comments

A research team has sequenced the genome of a 45,000-year-old modern human male from western Siberia. A genome comparison showed that he lived close in time to when the ancestors of present-day people in Europe and eastern Asia went different ways.

Skin Cells Reprogrammed Directly into Brain Cells

October 22, 2014 1:30 pm | News | Comments

Scientists have described a way to convert human skin cells directly into a specific type of brain cell affected by Huntington’s disease, an ultimately fatal neurodegenerative disorder.                   

Why Ebola Kills Some People, Others Survive

October 21, 2014 10:29 am | by Lauran Neergaard - AP Medical Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

People who shared an apartment with the country's first Ebola patient are emerging from quarantine healthy. And while Thomas Eric Duncan died and two U.S. nurses were infected caring for him, there are successes, too: A nurse infected in Spain has recovered, as have four American aid workers infected in West Africa. Even there, not everyone dies.

Stem Cell-based Intestinal Tissue Implanted in Mice

October 20, 2014 10:21 am | Videos | Comments

Researchers have successfully transplanted “organoids” of functioning human intestinal tissue grown from pluripotent stem cells in a lab dish into mice– creating an unprecedented model for studying diseases of the intestine.        

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