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New MRSA Superbug Emerges in Brazil

April 18, 2014 1:17 pm | News | Comments

An international research team identified a new superbug that caused a bloodstream infection in a Brazilian patient. The new superbug is part of a class of highly-resistant bacteria known as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). The superbug has also acquired high levels of resistance to vancomycin, the most common and least expensive antibiotic used to treat severe MRSA infections worldwide. 

Deadly Human Pathogen Cryptococcus Fully Sequenced

April 18, 2014 12:36 pm | News | Comments

Researchers have sequenced the entire genome and all the RNA products of the most important...

Chronic Inflammation May Be Linked to Aggressive Prostate Cancer

April 18, 2014 12:11 pm | News | Comments

The presence of chronic inflammation in benign prostate tissue was associated with high-grade,...

Lost Stem Cells Naturally Replaced by Non-stem Cells

April 18, 2014 11:58 am | News | Comments

Researchers have discovered an unexpected phenomenon in the organs that produce sperm in fruit...

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Small Molecules Making Big News in Cancer Treatment

April 17, 2014 2:24 pm | by Neil Canavan | Articles | Comments

Size doesn’t matter as long as long as you can get the job done. That said, one may be forgiven the impression that larger molecules—antibodies and related constructs, or T cells themselves being used in immunotherapies—were preferentially presented at American Association of Cancer Research annual conference

New Technique Detects Microscopic Diabetes-related Eye Damage

April 17, 2014 2:07 pm | News | Comments

Indiana University researchers have detected new early-warning signs of the potential loss of sight associated with diabetes. This discovery could have far-reaching implications for the diagnosis and treatment of diabetic retinopathy, potentially impacting the care of over 25 million Americans.

Some Immune Cells Defend Only One Organ

April 17, 2014 1:52 pm | News | Comments

Scientists have uncovered a new way the immune system may fight cancers and viral infections. The finding could aid efforts to use immune cells to treat illness. The research, in mice, suggests that some organs have the immunological equivalent of “neighborhood police” – specialized squads of defenders that patrol only one area, a single organ, instead of an entire city, the body.

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Scientists Explain How Memories Stick Together

April 17, 2014 12:46 pm | News | Comments

Scientists have created a new model of memory that explains how neurons retain select memories a few hours after an event. This new framework provides a more complete picture of how memory works, which can inform research into disorders liked Parkinson's and Alzheimer's.

Groundbreaking MRI Scan Shows Brown Fat in Tissues

April 17, 2014 12:22 pm | News | Comments

Researchers used an MRI-based method to identify and confirm the presence of brown adipose tissue in a living adult, which could prove to be an essential step towards a new wave of therapies to aid the fight against diabetes and obesity.   

Ebola Virus in Africa Outbreak is New Strain

April 16, 2014 5:21 pm | by Marilynn Marchione - AP Chief Medical Writer | News | Comments

The Ebola virus that has killed scores of people in Guinea this year is a new strain - evidence that the disease did not spread there from outbreaks in some other African nations, scientists report.               

Immunotherapies Rock the House

April 16, 2014 2:05 pm | by Neil Canavan | Articles | Comments

The potential of immunotherapies drew large interest at this year's American Association for Cancer Research annual meeting. And the new data are particularly striking for their clinical results—reporting once uncommon at this basic research meeting.

Teenage Concussions Linked to Higher Rates of Suicide Attempts

April 16, 2014 2:04 pm | News | Comments

Teenagers who have suffered a traumatic brain injury such as a concussion are at “significantly greater odds” of attempting suicide, being bullied and engaging in a variety of high risk behaviors, a new study has found.          

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Diabetes Cases Nearly Doubled Over Past Two Decades

April 16, 2014 1:52 pm | News | Comments

Cases of diabetes and pre-diabetes in the United States have nearly doubled since 1988, suggests new research, with obesity apparently to blame for the surge.                           

Scientists Discover Brain’s Anti-distraction System

April 16, 2014 1:38 pm | News | Comments

Psychologists have presented the first study to reveal that our brains rely on an active suppression mechanism to avoid being distracted by salient irrelevant information when we want to focus on a particular item or task.         

DNA Looping Damage Tied to HPV Cancer

April 16, 2014 1:26 pm | News | Comments

It’s long been known that certain strains of human papillomavirus (HPV) cause cancer. Now, researchers have determined a new way that HPV might spark cancer development– by disrupting the human DNA sequence with repeating loops when the virus is inserted into host-cell DNA as it replicates.

Breaking News: Marijuana Use Linked to Brain Abnormalities

April 16, 2014 8:30 am | News | Comments

Young adults who used marijuana only recreationally showed significant abnormalities in two brain regions that are important in emotion and motivation. This is the first study to show casual use of marijuana is related to major brain changes.  

Limiting a Certain Protein in the Brain Reverses Alzheimer's Symptoms in Mice

April 15, 2014 12:18 pm | News | Comments

Limiting a certain protein in the brain reverses Alzheimer’s symptoms in mice, report neuroscientists at MIT’s Picower Institute for Learning and Memory. Researchers found that the overproduction of the protein known as p25 may be the culprit behind the sticky protein-fragment clusters that build up in the brains of Alzheimer's patients.

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Young Dads at High Risk of Depression, Too

April 15, 2014 12:07 pm | News | Comments

Depression can hit young fathers hard- with symptoms increasing dramatically during some of the most important years of their children’s lives, a new study has found.                        

Targeting Cancer with a Triple Threat

April 15, 2014 11:55 am | News | Comments

Delivering chemotherapy drugs in nanoparticle form could help reduce side effects by targeting the drugs directly to the tumors. In recent years, scientists have developed nanoparticles that deliver one or two chemotherapy drugs, but it has been difficult to design particles that can carry any more than that in a precise ratio. Now chemists have devised a new way to build such nanoparticles.

Gene Panel Effectively Screens Dozens of Genes for Cancer-associated Mutations

April 15, 2014 11:45 am | News | Comments

As many as 10 percent of women with a personal or family history of breast or ovarian cancer have at least one genetic mutation that, if known, would prompt their doctors to recommend changes in their care, according to a new study by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine.

Drawing a Ring Around Antiviral Immunity

April 15, 2014 11:37 am | News | Comments

If you follow cancer biology, then you’ve probably heard of ubiquitin before. In a recent paper researchers provided a structural rationale for how ubiquitin helps RIG-I do its job— and how that might help keep the immune system from getting out of hand.

Study Says We’re Over the Hill at 24

April 15, 2014 11:28 am | News | Comments

It’s a hard pill to swallow, but if you’re over 24 years of age you’ve already reached your peak in terms of your cognitive motor performance, according to a new Simon Fraser University study. In one of the first social science experiments to rest on big data, researchers investigated when we start to experience an age-related decline in our cognitive motor skills and how we compensate for that.

Central Ohio Mumps Outbreak Tops 200 Cases

April 14, 2014 8:18 pm | by The Associated Press | News | Comments

A mumps outbreak in central Ohio has grown to more than 200 confirmed cases, public health officials said. A total of 212 cases of the contagious viral illness, with 132 of those linked to Ohio State University, have been reported.    

MicroRNA Could be Key Target for Bowel Cancer Treatment

April 14, 2014 2:42 pm | News | Comments

A tiny genetic molecule known as a microRNA plays a central role in bowel cancer and could be key to developing new treatments for the disease, a new study concludes. Scientists found that the molecule, called microRNA 135b, is a vital ‘worker’ employed by several important cancer genes to drive the growth of bowel cancers.

Brain Activity May Mark the Beginning of Memories

April 14, 2014 2:30 pm | Videos | Comments

By tracking brain activity when an animal stops to look around its environment, neuroscientists at Johns Hopkins University believe they can mark the birth of a memory. Using lab rats on a circular track, a team of brain scientists, noticed that the rats frequently paused to inspect their environment with head movements as they ran.

Virus-fighting Genes Linked to Mutations in Cancer

April 14, 2014 2:15 pm | News | Comments

Researchers have found a major piece of genetic evidence that confirms the role of a group of virus-fighting genes in cancer development. The APOBEC family of genes control enzymes that are believed to have evolved in humans to fight off viral infections. Scientists have speculated that these enzymes are responsible for a very distinct signature of mutations that is present in approximately half of all cancer types.

Protein Researchers Closing in on the Mystery of Schizophrenia

April 11, 2014 2:20 pm | News | Comments

Schizophrenia is a severe disease for which there is still no effective medical treatment. In an attempt to understand exactly what happens in the brain of schizophrenic people, researchers from the University of Southern Denmark have analyzed proteins in the brains of rats that have been given hallucinogenic drugs.

How Nerve Cells Flexibly Adapt to Acoustic Signals

April 11, 2014 2:06 pm | News | Comments

Depending on the input signal, neurons generate action potentials either near or far away from the cell body. This flexibility improves our ability to localize sound sources. In order to process acoustic information with high temporal fidelity, nerve cells may flexibly adapt their mode of operation according to the situation.

How the Brain Pays Attention

April 11, 2014 1:46 pm | Videos | Comments

Picking out a face in the crowd is a complicated task: Your brain has to retrieve the memory of the face you’re seeking, then hold it in place while scanning the crowd, paying special attention to finding a match. A new study reveals how the brain achieves this type of focused attention on faces or other objects.

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