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Obesity Genes Identified by Worldwide Research Team

February 24, 2015 9:43 am | by Queensland University of Technology | News | Comments

A massive worldwide analysis of genetic data from almost 340,000 people around the world has brought understanding of the genetic basis of obesity a step closer.                

Study Shows Destroying Material That Cloaks Cancer Cells Could Benefit Patients

February 24, 2015 9:31 am | by Translational Genomics Research Institute | News | Comments

Like a stealth jet cloaks itself from radar, cancer cells cloak themselves within tumors by hiding behind a dense layer of cellular material known as stroma.                 

New ALS Gene and Signaling Pathways Identified

February 20, 2015 4:37 pm | News | Comments

Using advanced DNA sequencing methods, researchers have identified a new gene that is associated with sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), or Lou Gehrig’s disease.                       

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WHO Approves 1st Quick Test for Ebola

February 20, 2015 4:31 pm | by Associated Press | News | Comments

The World Health Organization said Friday it has approved a quick test for Ebola that will dramatically cut the time it takes to determine - with reasonable accuracy - whether someone is infected with the deadly virus.                  

Challenges for Doctors Using Fitness Trackers, Apps

February 20, 2015 4:26 pm | by Anick Jesdanun, AP Tech Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

More hospitals and doctors are starting to use data from fitness trackers and health apps to help treat patients. But they are moving cautiously. The technology has a lot of potential, but there are key challenges to work out...

Disruption in Brain Signals Shed New Light on Melancholic Depression

February 19, 2015 11:54 am | by University of New South Wales | News | Comments

Researchers have identified a distinctive brain signature in people with melancholic depression, supporting calls for its classification as a unique mood disorder type.               

Camel, Alpaca Antibodies Target Anticancer Viruses Directly to Tumors

February 19, 2015 11:49 am | by Julia Evangelou Strait, WUSTL | News | Comments

Using antibodies from camels and alpacas, scientists have found a way to deliver anticancer viruses directly to tumor cells, leaving other types of cells uninfected.                

Keeping Atherosclerosis in Check with Novel Targeted Nanomedicines

February 19, 2015 11:42 am | by Columbia University | News | Comments

Nanometer-sized “drones” that deliver a special type of healing molecule to fat deposits in arteries could become a new way to prevent heart attacks caused by atherosclerosis.              

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New Nanogel for Drug Delivery

February 19, 2015 11:31 am | by Anne Trafton, MIT | News | Comments

Scientists are interested in using gels to deliver drugs because they can be molded into specific shapes and designed to release their payload over a specified time period. However, current versions aren’t always practical because must be implanted surgically.

2 Dead, Over 170 Potentially Exposed in 'Superbug' Outbreak

February 19, 2015 11:21 am | by Robert Jablon, Associated Press | News | Comments

Contaminated medical instruments are suspected in a "superbug" outbreak at a Los Angeles hospital that has infected at least seven patients, two of whom died. More than 170 others may have been exposed to the antibiotic-resistant bacteria.   

How Right Hemisphere Assists Left When Damaged in Stroke

February 18, 2015 12:46 pm | by George Washington Univ. | News | Comments

A new study conducted by a researcher at the George Washington University suggests that the right hemisphere of the brain may be able to assist a damaged left hemisphere in protecting visual attention after a stroke.

Amyloid Formation May Link Alzheimer's, Type 2 Diabetes

February 18, 2015 12:28 pm | by Elsevier Health Sciences | News | Comments

The pathological process amyloidosis, in which misfolded proteins (amyloids) form insoluble fibril deposits, occurs in many diseases, including Alzheimer disease (AD) and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D). 

Tadpole Model Links Drug Exposure to Autism-Like Effects

February 18, 2015 11:51 am | News | Comments

Research suggests that fetal exposure to chemicals or drugs can cause neurological problems. Babies whose mothers take the epilepsy drug valporic acid (VPA) during pregnancy, for example, appear to have an elevated risk of developing an autism spectrum disorder.

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Is Strenuous Running Really as Bad for Health as Lounging?

February 18, 2015 11:32 am | by Cynthia Fox, Science Writer | News | Comments

Running hard may be as bad for your longevity as being a couch potato, says a recent study—one that should be taken with a grain of salt (hold the butter), say some critics. The study, in a recent Journal of the American College of Cardiology, examined 5,048 healthy people enrolled in the Copenhagen City Heart Study. For 12 years, 1,098 healthy joggers and 413 healthy, but sedentary non-joggers were followed.

Broca's Area is the Brain's Scriptwriter, Shaping Speech

February 17, 2015 4:27 pm | by Johns Hopkins University | News | Comments

This new insight about Broca’s area, which is located in the frontal cortex above and behind the left eye, could ultimately benefit the treatment of language impairments due to stroke, epilepsy and brain injuries.        

Anti-Inflammatory Mechanism of Dieting, Fasting Revealed

February 17, 2015 4:22 pm | by Karen N. Peart, Yale News | News | Comments

Researchers have found that a compound produced by the body when dieting or fasting can block a part of the immune system involved in several inflammatory disorders such as type 2 diabetes, atherosclerosis, and Alzheimer’s disease.     

Iron May be a Factor in Dementia

February 17, 2015 4:09 pm | by Leigh Dayton, UTS | News | Comments

There is no way to spot Alzheimer's early, no effective treatment and no known cure.                             

Severe Sore Throat Linked to Forgotten Bacterium

February 17, 2015 4:03 pm | by Bob Shepard, UAB | News | Comments

New research suggests that this bacterium causes more often causes severe sore throats in young adults than streptococcus — the cause of the much better known strep throat.             

Protein Clue to Sudden Cardiac Death

February 17, 2015 3:56 pm | by Oxford University | News | Comments

A protein has been shown to have a surprising role in regulating the 'glue' that holds heart cells together, a finding that may explain how a gene defect could cause sudden cardiac death.            

Health Groups Say AIDS No. 1 Killer of Adolescents in Africa

February 17, 2015 3:47 pm | by Tom Odula, Associated Press | News | Comments

Global health organizations said Tuesday that AIDS is now the leading cause of death for adolescents in Africa, and the second leading cause of death among adolescents globally.              

How Technology Can Block Our Creativity

February 17, 2015 2:21 pm | by Ryan Bushey, Associate Editor | Videos | Comments

The Atlantic's James Hamblin explores how our obsession with smartphones could stifle creative impulses.                              

Two Cell-Signaling Molecules Found to Suppress the Spread of Melanoma

February 17, 2015 10:21 am | by NYU Langone | News | Comments

Findings advance efforts to identify who would benefit from more aggressive therapy at earliest stages.                          

Molecular Inhibitor Breaks Cycle That Leads to Alzheimer's

February 17, 2015 10:15 am | by University of Cambridge | News | Comments

A molecule that can block the progress of Alzheimer’s disease at a crucial stage in its development has been identified by researchers in a new study, raising the prospect that more such molecules may now be found.        

Taking Technology from the Lab to the Patient

February 17, 2015 10:06 am | by Anne Trafton, MIT | News | Comments

A MIT researcher wants to bring advances in drug delivery and biomaterials to the clinic.                            

Researchers Discover Molecular Trigger of IBD

February 17, 2015 10:00 am | by Duke University | News | Comments

Cells lining the intestinal tract form a critical barrier, protecting our bodies from the billions of bacteria living in the gut.                      

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