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Immune System Molecules May Promote Weight Loss

June 6, 2014 1:12 pm | News | Comments

The calorie-burning triggered by cold temperatures can be achieved biochemically– without the chill– raising hopes for a weight-loss strategy focused on the immune system rather than the brain, according to a new study.          

Seemingly Invincible Cancer Stem Cells Reveal a Weakness

June 6, 2014 12:55 pm | News | Comments

Metastatic cancer cells, which can migrate from primary tumors to seed new malignancies, have thus far been resistant to the current arsenal of anticancer drugs. Now, researchers have identified a critical weakness that actually exploits one of these cells’ apparent strengths—their ability to move and invade tissues.

Three Gene Networks Discovered in Autism

June 6, 2014 12:45 pm | News | Comments

A large new analysis of DNA from thousands of patients has uncovered several underlying gene networks with potentially important roles in autism. These networks may offer attractive targets for developing new autism drugs or repurposing existing drugs that act on components of the networks.

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Prostate Cancer Biomarkers Found in Seminal Fluid

June 6, 2014 12:35 pm | News | Comments

Improved diagnosis and management of one of the most common cancers in men- prostate cancer- could result from research, which has discovered that seminal fluid (semen) contains biomarkers for the disease.              

Obesity Research Takes Aim at Protein Regulators

June 6, 2014 9:00 am | by Skip Derra | Articles | Comments

You are what you eat, but researchers are beginning to realize that what and when you eat is controlled by a myriad of underlying biological triggers acting in concert.                       

Breaking News: Air Pollution Linked to Autism, Schizophrenia

June 5, 2014 3:00 pm | News | Comments

A new study shows how exposure to air pollution early in life produces harmful changes in the brains of mice, including an enlargement of part of the brain that is seen in humans who have autism and schizophrenia.           

Tool Enables Better Delivery of Brain Cancer Treatment

June 5, 2014 2:17 pm | News | Comments

Surgery and radiation for a glioblastoma have only limited effectiveness because the tumor is particularly aggressive, infiltrating brain tissue surrounding the primary tumor. Scientists have developed a technique designed to open the blood-brain barrier at targeted locations just far enough to allow the passage of drug-bearing nanoparticles.

Tangled Path of Alzheimer's-linked Brain Cells Mapped in Mice

June 5, 2014 12:41 pm | News | Comments

By studying laboratory mice, scientists have succeeded in plotting the labyrinthine paths of some of the largest nerve cells in the mammalian brain: cholinergic neurons, the first cells to degenerate in people with Alzheimer’s disease.      

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Study Documents MERS Spread from Camel to Person

June 4, 2014 5:17 pm | by Mike Stobbe - AP Medical Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

A new report offers the strongest evidence yet that a mysterious Middle East virus spreads from camels to people. Researchers studied the illness of a 44-year-old camel owner in Saudi Arabia, who died in November of Middle East respiratory syndrome, or MERS.

Saturated Fat May Influence Expression of Obesity Genes

June 4, 2014 2:28 pm | News | Comments

Limiting saturated fat could help people whose genetic make-up increases their chance of being obese, according to a new study. The findings could be useful in identifying people who are predisposed to obesity and could ultimately lead to personalized dietary recommendations.

Test Predicts if Breast Cancer Will Spread

June 4, 2014 2:21 pm | News | Comments

A test that counts the number of locations in tumor specimens where tumor cells may invade blood vessels predicted the risk of distant spread, or metastasis, for the most common type of breast cancer.               

Experimental Drug Targets Skin, Lung Cancers

June 4, 2014 1:55 pm | News | Comments

Researchers are reporting promising treatment milestones for patients with deadly skin and lung cancers who are being treated with an experimental drug called MK-3475.                        

Honeybees’ Changing Roles Throughout Their Lives Linked to Brain Chemistry

June 4, 2014 11:35 am | News | Comments

Scientists have been linking an increasing range of behaviors and inclinations from monogamy to addiction to animals’, including humans’, underlying biology. To that growing list, they’re adding division of labor—at least in killer bees.

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Complex Neural Circuitry Keeps You from Biting Your Tongue

June 4, 2014 11:03 am | News | Comments

Eating seems to be a rather basic biological task. Yet chewing requires a complex interplay between the tongue and jaw. If the act weren't coordinated, the chewer would end up biting more tongue than food. Researchers used a tracing technique in mice to map the underlying brain circuitry that keeps mealtime relatively painless.

Researchers Shut Down a SARS Cloaking System

June 4, 2014 10:44 am | News | Comments

A Purdue University-led research team has figured out how to disable a part of the SARS virus responsible for hiding it from the immune system; a critical step in developing a vaccine against the deadly disease. The findings also have potential applications in the creation of vaccines against other coronaviruses, including MERS.

Heart-shocking ‘Shirt’ Could Save Lives

June 3, 2014 1:46 pm | News | Comments

Biomedical engineering students have designed a lightweight, easy-to-conceal shirt-like garment to deliver life-saving shocks to patients experiencing serious heart problems. The students say their design improves upon a wearable defibrillator system that is already in use.

Scientists Uncover Features of Antibody-Producing Cells in HIV

June 3, 2014 1:38 pm | News | Comments

By analyzing the blood of almost 100 treated and untreated HIV-infected volunteers, a team of scientists has identified previously unknown characteristics of B cells in the context of HIV infection.               

Molecular 'Scaffold' Could Hold Key to New Dementia Treatments

June 3, 2014 1:36 pm | News | Comments

Researchers at King’s College London have discovered how a molecular ‘scaffold’ which allows key parts of cells to interact, comes apart in dementia and motor neuron disease (such as ALS), revealing a potential new target for drug discovery.

Brain May be Able to Repair Itself from Within

June 3, 2014 1:25 pm | News | Comments

Researchers have found a new type of neuron in the adult brain that is capable of telling stem cells to make more new neurons. Though the experiments are in their early stages, the finding opens the tantalizing possibility that the brain may be able to repair itself from within.

Children with Autism Have Elevated Levels of Steroid Hormones in the Womb

June 3, 2014 1:24 pm | News | Comments

Children who later develop autism are exposed to elevated levels of steroid hormones (for example testosterone, progesterone and cortisol) in the womb, according to scientists. The finding may help explain why autism is more common in males than females. However, the researchers caution it should not be used to screen for the condition.

Young Women Fare Worse than Young Men After Heart Attack

June 3, 2014 1:02 pm | News | Comments

Women age 55 or younger may fare worse than their male counterparts after having a heart attack, according to new research presented at the American Heart Association’s Quality of Care and Outcomes Research Scientific Sessions 2014. Researchers studied records and interviews of 3,501 people (67 percent women) who had heart attacks in the United States and Spain in 2008-12.

BRCA2 Gene Now Connected to Lung Cancer, Doubling a Smoker's Risk

June 2, 2014 2:38 pm | News | Comments

New research confirms a vulnerability to lung cancer can be inherited and implicates the BRCA2 gene as harboring one of the involved genetic mutations. The study scanned the genomes of more than 11 thousand individuals of European descent to look for common variations associated with non-small cell carcinoma. The analysis showed that variations in the BRCA2 and CHEK2 genes can significantly increase an individual's risk for lung cancer.

Fatty Liver Disease Prevented in Mice

June 2, 2014 2:26 pm | News | Comments

Studying mice, researchers have found a way to prevent nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, the most common cause of chronic liver disease worldwide. Blocking a path that delivers dietary fructose to the liver is what prevented mice from developing the condition.

Research Details How Developing Neurons Sense a Chemical Cue

June 2, 2014 2:17 pm | News | Comments

Symmetry is an inherent part of development. As an embryo, an organism’s brain and spinal cord, like the rest of its body, organize themselves into left and right halves as they grow. But a certain set of nerve cells do something unusual: they cross from one side to the other. New research in mice delves into the details of the molecular interactions that help guide these neurons toward this anatomical boundary.

Cystic Fibrosis, Diabetes Link Explained

June 2, 2014 12:15 pm | News | Comments

Many people with cystic fibrosis develop diabetes. The reasons for this have been largely unknown, but now researchers have identified a molecular mechanism that contributes to the raised diabetes risk.              

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