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The Skin Cancer Selfie

October 29, 2014 1:02 pm | Videos | Comments

If melanoma, the deadliest form of skin cancer, is caught early enough it is almost always curable. Now, a camera capable of taking snapshots of the entire human body and rendering high-resolution images of a patient’s skin may help doctors spot cancer early and save lives.

Genetic Screening Could Reduce Number of Breast Cancer Cases

October 29, 2014 12:37 pm | News | Comments

Should every newborn baby girl be genetically screened for breast-cancer risk? That isn’t cost-effective— yet. But if it were, would it be worthwhile? A previous study said no. But, new research suggests otherwise.           

Investigating the Remarkable Memory of 'SuperAgers'

October 29, 2014 11:30 am | News | Comments

In 2012, scientists captured national attention by identifying for the first time a group of people over 80 with remarkable, age-defying memory power. Now, the same scientists will continue studying these “SuperAgers” to find out how they resist cognitive decline.  

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Researchers Sequence Enterovirus D68 Genome

October 29, 2014 11:24 am | News | Comments

Researchers have sequenced the genome of enterovirus D68 sampled from patients treated at St. Louis Children’s Hospital. Nationwide, the virus has spread rapidly in recent months.                     

Blood Test Could Diagnose Early-onset Alzheimer’s

October 29, 2014 10:58 am | News | Comments

A non-invasive blood test that could diagnose early-onset Alzheimer’s disease (AD) with increased accuracy has been developed by researchers. The new early-detection blood test could predict these changes and a person’s risk of developing AD much earlier than is currently possible.

Google Developing Pill to Detect Cancer

October 29, 2014 10:45 am | by Brandon Bailey - AP Technology Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

Google is working on a cancer-detecting pill in its latest effort to push the boundaries of technology. Still in the experimental stage, the pill is packed with tiny magnetic particles, which can travel through a patient's bloodstream, search for malignant cells and report their findings to a sensor on a wearable device.

Ebola’s Patient Zero Was Guinean Toddler

October 28, 2014 4:27 pm | by Maria Cheng - AP Medical Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

In the Guinean village where the current West African Ebola outbreak began, 14 graves mark the spot where the lethal virus began to spiral out of control.                           

DNA-repairing Enzyme Can Worsen Tissue Damage

October 28, 2014 3:04 pm | News | Comments

When tissues are deprived of blood, as happens during a stroke or heart attack, the lack of oxygen can cause serious damage. A new study shows that surprisingly, a DNA-repair enzyme called Aag actually makes this damage worse.       

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Mathematical Models Can Predict Cellular Processes

October 28, 2014 2:34 pm | News | Comments

A multi-institutional, international team of researchers studied cells found in breast and other types of connective tissue and discovered new information about cell transitions that take place during wound healing and cancer.          

Biosensor Technology Could Allow Rapid Ebola Detection

October 28, 2014 2:18 pm | News | Comments

In 2010, a study reported the rapid detection of Ebola virus using new biosensor technology. There was little interest in developing the technology at the time, but now, in the wake of an Ebola outbreak, the researcher plans to resume his work on virus detection.

Vitamin D Deficiency Ups Attack Risk in Asthmatics

October 28, 2014 2:03 pm | News | Comments

A new study points to a convenient, free way to manage acute asthmatic episodes— catching some rays outside. The research showed that asthmatics with vitamin D deficiency were 25 percent more likely to experience acute attacks.       

Algae Virus Found in Healthy Human Throats

October 28, 2014 1:51 pm | News | Comments

Scientists have discovered an algae virus never before seen in the throats of healthy people that may subtly alter a range of cognitive functions including visual processing and spatial orientation in those who harbor it.         

Nurse Free of Ebola, Released from Hospital

October 28, 2014 1:26 pm | by Ray Henry - Associated Press - Associated Press | News | Comments

Amber Vinson, a nurse who fueled Ebola fears by flying to Cleveland after being infected by her dying patient in Dallas, is now virus-free, and was celebrated Tuesday by her caregivers as courageous and passionate before getting out of the hospital.

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Patient-relevant Preclinical Models Using Image-guided Small Animal Irradiation

October 28, 2014 11:33 am | by Dr. Rajendra Kumari, Chief Scientific Officer, PRECOS Ltd., a Crown Bioscience Company | Articles | Comments

Radiotherapy is a primary, adjuvant or neoadjuvant treatment for a number of different cancers, such as glioblastoma, breast, lung and prostate. Image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) is used to reduce the amount of radiation delivered to the normal tissue surrounding the targeted tumor. However, in the preclinical setting, the use of IGRT is less common.

Two Stem Cell Beliefs Debunked

October 27, 2014 2:48 pm | News | Comments

Two recent papers may have upturned two common beliefs about adult stem cells: One reported that there appears to be stem cells in the esophagus, while the other reported that a fetal stem cell that can become either a liver cell or an endothelial cell.

Heart Drug Helps Treat ALS in Mice

October 27, 2014 2:31 pm | News | Comments

Digoxin, a medication used in the treatment of heart failure, may be adaptable for the treatment of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), a progressive, paralyzing disease, suggests new research.                  

Dietary Flavanols Reverse Age-related Memory Decline

October 27, 2014 2:26 pm | Videos | Comments

Dietary cocoa flavanols—naturally occurring bioactives found in cocoa—reversed age-related memory decline in healthy older adults, according to a new study.                           

Lipids, Not Calories, Trigger a Strong Insulin Response

October 27, 2014 2:16 pm | News | Comments

Researchers studying lipoproteins in Drosophila melanogaster found that that the blood-brain barrier is a main sensor to report the nutritional status, especially the lipid composition of consumed food, to special neurons that regulate insulin release.

Researchers Observe Brain Development in Utero

October 27, 2014 2:03 pm | Videos | Comments

New investigation methods using functional magnetic resonance tomography (fMRT) offer insights into fetal brain development. These in vivo observations will uncover different stages of the brain's development.              

New Home Test Shakes Up Colon Cancer Screening

October 27, 2014 8:30 am | by Marilynn Marchione - AP Chief Medical Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

Starting Monday, millions of people who have avoided colon cancer screening can get a new home test that's noninvasive and doesn't require the icky preparation most other methods do. The test is the first to look for cancer-related DNA in stool. 

Governors Stress Home Quarantine for Ebola Workers

October 27, 2014 3:26 am | by Frank Eltman - Associated Press - Associated Press | News | Comments

A nurse who protested being kept in a tent in New Jersey over the weekend despite lacking symptoms after caring for Ebola patients in West Africa was to be released Monday as scientists and federal officials clashed with state officials over quarantine policies.

Proteins Direct Precursors of Pyramidal Cells to Their Destination

October 24, 2014 11:26 am | News | Comments

Researchers have now discovered that FLRT proteins on the surface of progenitor cells can induce repellent and attractant signals depending on its binding partner.                         

New Weight Loss Regulation Clues Discovered

October 24, 2014 11:18 am | News | Comments

A hormone seen as a popular target to develop weight loss drugs works by directly targeting the brain and triggering previously unknown activity in the nervous system, obesity researchers have found.                

Brain Remains Stable During Learning, Model Shows

October 24, 2014 10:28 am | News | Comments

Complex biochemical signals that coordinate fast and slow changes in neuronal networks keep the brain in balance during learning, according to an international team of scientists.                     

Thyroid Cancer Genome Analysis Finds Markers of Aggressive Tumors

October 24, 2014 10:21 am | News | Comments

A new comprehensive analysis of thyroid cancer from The Cancer Genome Atlas Research Network has identified markers of aggressive tumors, which could allow for better targeting of appropriate treatments to individual patients.       

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