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Skin Tumors Develop Specific Mutations to Resist Drug

March 11, 2015 10:26 am | by Krista Conger, Stanford School of Medicine | News | Comments

Basal cell carcinomas develop mutations in a protein on the Hedgehog pathway to evade a common drug therapy. Targeting another portion of the pathway may be an effective alternative treatment.                                                            

Study Shows Connection Between Key Autism Risk Genes in Human Brain

March 11, 2015 10:16 am | by Lindsay Borthwick, Yale | News | Comments

A new study reveals an important connection between dozens of genes that may contribute to autism, a major step toward understanding how brain development goes awry in some individuals with the disorder.                                                 

Scientists Reveal Structural Secrets of Nature's Little Locomotive

March 11, 2015 10:07 am | by TSRI | News | Comments

Findings could help shed light on Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, ALS and other diseases.                             

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Cellular Scissors Chop Up HIV

March 11, 2015 9:50 am | by Salk Institute for Biological Studies | News | Comments

Salk scientists re-engineered the bacterial defense system CRISPR to recognize HIV inside human cells and destroy the virus, offering a potential new therapy.                 

Understanding How Neurons Shape Memories of Smells

March 11, 2015 9:35 am | by Christina Johnson and Scott LaFee, UC San Diego | News | Comments

Discovery has implications for understanding epilepsy.                                  

Stanford Showcases New App for Studying Heart Health

March 10, 2015 4:07 pm | by Ryan Bushey, Associate Editor | Videos | Comments

Apple teamed up with a handful of universities to create these medical research applications.                            

First Look at Hospitalized Ebola Survivors' Immune Cells Could Guide Vaccine Design

March 10, 2015 10:29 am | by Emory University | News | Comments

In the ongoing Ebola outbreak in West Africa, whose death toll is approaching 10,000, little information has been available about how the human immune response unfolds after infection. Researchers have now obtained a first look at the immune responses in four Ebola virus disease survivors who received care at Emory University Hospital in 2014, by closely examining their T cells and B cells during the acute phase of the disease.

Protein in the Brain Can 'Put the Brakes' On Binge Drinking

March 10, 2015 10:20 am | by UNC | News | Comments

A new study led by UNC researchers identifies both where in the brain and how a protein in the brain, called Neuropeptide Y or NPY, can act to suppress binge alcohol drinking. These findings suggest that restoring NPY may be useful for treating alcohol use disorders and may also protect some individuals from becoming alcohol dependent.

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Childhood Leukemia Study Reveals Disease Subtypes, New Treatment Option

March 10, 2015 10:12 am | by Pete Farley, UCSF | News | Comments

One of every eight patients might benefit from highly successful lymphoma drugs.                              

Breakthrough Therapies Target Cancers in 2015

March 10, 2015 9:39 am | by Bevin Fletcher, Associate Editor | Articles | Comments

Getting a new drug to market is difficult, but the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) offers a number of ways to help the process along for promising drugs that have potential against serious diseases.  One of these options is designation as a breakthrough therapy. This year a number of these therapies are targeted at fighting cancer.

Study Shows People With Anorexia and Body Dysmorphic Disorder Have Similar Brain Abnormalities

March 9, 2015 10:28 am | by Mark Wheeler, UCLA | News | Comments

People with anorexia nervosa and with body dysmorphic disorder have similar abnormalities in their brains that affect their ability to process visual information, a new UCLA study reveals.            

Researchers Map "Genomic Landscape" of Childhood Adrenocortical Tumors for First Time

March 9, 2015 10:15 am | by St. Jude Children's Research Hospital | News | Comments

In an advance that could lead to better identification of malignant pediatric adrenocortical tumors, and ultimately to better treatment, researchers have mapped the “genomic landscape” of these rare childhood tumors. Their genomic mapping has revealed unprecedented details, not only of the aberrant genetic and chromosomal changes that drive the cancer, but the sequence of those changes that trigger it.

Liberia Removes Ebola Crematorium as Outbreak is Contained

March 9, 2015 10:07 am | by Jonathan Paye-Layleh, Associated Press | News | Comments

Marking the progress in controlling its Ebola outbreak, the Liberian government dismantled a crematorium and removed drums containing the ashes of more than 3,000 Ebola victims cremated during the height of the epidemic, whose last patient was discharged last week.

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Researchers Report New Gene Associated With Thyroid Levels

March 9, 2015 10:01 am | by University of Bristol | News | Comments

Thyroid hormones have important and diverse roles in human health and regulate metabolic rate. Thyroid disease is common (affecting 5-10 per cent of the population) and synthetic thyroid hormones are one of the commonest drug therapies prescribed worldwide.

Synaptic Shortcut

March 9, 2015 9:42 am | by Stephanie Dutchen, Harvard Medical School | News | Comments

Newly discovered brain pathway overturns anatomy, could solve antipsychotic mystery.                             

Michael J. Fox Foundation Announces New Funding for Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s Research

March 6, 2015 1:44 pm | by Bevin Fletcher, Associate Editor | Articles | Comments

Michael J. Fox Foundation and Alzheimer’s Association fund $2 million for research projects studying overlap in neurodegenerative diseases.                    

New Understanding of Stroke Damage May Aid Recovery

March 6, 2015 10:57 am | by Michael C. Purdy, Washington University in St. Louis | News | Comments

Stroke can lead to a wide range of problems such as depression and difficulty moving, speaking and paying attention. A new study has found compelling evidence that stroke damage to “cables” buried inside the brain plays an important role in these impairments.

The Rise and Fall of Cognitive Skills

March 6, 2015 10:33 am | by Anne Trafton, MIT | News | Comments

Neuroscientists find that different parts of the brain work best at different ages.                             

Exposure to Endocrine Disruptors During Pregnancy Affects Brain Two Generations Later

March 6, 2015 10:26 am | by The Endocrine Society | News | Comments

Prenatal exposure to low doses of the environmental contaminants polychlorinated biphenyls, or PCBs, change the developing brain in an area involved in metabolism, and some effects are apparent even two generations later, a new study finds.   

DNA Safeguard May Be Key in Cancer Treatment

March 6, 2015 10:05 am | by Krishna Ramanujan, Cornell University | News | Comments

Researchers have developed a new technique to understand the actions of key proteins required for cancer cells to proliferate.                      

Researchers Map 'Switches' That Shaped the Evolution of the Human Brain

March 6, 2015 9:59 am | by Lindsay Borthwick, Yale | News | Comments

Thousands of genetic “dimmer” switches, regions of DNA known as regulatory elements, were turned up high during human evolution in the developing cerebral cortex, according to new research.            

'Stem Cell' Test Could Identify Most Aggressive Breast Cancers

March 5, 2015 10:03 am | by The Institute of Cancer Research | News | Comments

Testing breast cancer cells for how closely they resemble stem cells could identify women with the most aggressive disease, a new study suggests.                   

Possible Progress Against Parkinson's

March 5, 2015 9:48 am | by B.D. Colen, Harvard Gazette | News | Comments

Implanted stem cells reduced symptoms of disease during experiment, researchers say.                             

Obesity is Associated With Brain's Neurotransmitters

March 5, 2015 9:39 am | by Aalto University | News | Comments

Researchers at Aalto University and University of Turku have revealed how obesity is associated with altered opioid neurotransmission in the brain.                   

Better Midlife Fitness May Slow Brain Aging

March 5, 2015 9:17 am | by American Heart Association | News | Comments

People with poor physical fitness in their 40s may have accelerated brain aging by the time they hit 60.                          

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