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FDA Approves First-of-Kind Device to Treat Obesity

January 15, 2015 9:51 am | by FDA | News | Comments

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved the Maestro Rechargeable System for certain obese adults, the first weight loss treatment device that targets the nerve pathway between the brain and the stomach that controls feelings of hunger and fullness.  

Red-Hot Coverage for Study: “Cold Noses Cause Colds"

January 15, 2015 9:46 am | by Cynthia Fox, Science Writer | Articles | Comments

Colds can come from cold noses, according to a high-profile study in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS).                                          

Paradox: Cues Associated with Infant Abuse May Help Reduce Stress in Adult Brain

January 15, 2015 9:44 am | by NYU Langone | News | Comments

Neurobiologists at NYU Langone Medical Center and elsewhere have found a surprising and paradoxical effect of abuse-related cues in rat pups: those cues  also can lower depressive-like behavior when the rat pups are fully grown.                               

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Iron Overload Disease Causes Rapid Bacteria Growth

January 15, 2015 9:40 am | by UCLA | News | Comments

Every summer, the news reports on a bacterium called Vibrio vulnificus found in warm saltwater that causes people to get sick, or die, after they eat raw tainted shellfish or when an open wound comes in contact with seawater.                                      

3-D Facial Imaging May Aid in Early Detection of Autism

January 14, 2015 4:18 pm | by University of Missouri | News | Comments

Early detection of autism in children is the key for treatments to be most effective and produce the best outcomes.                        

Studying Fetal Liver Fibrogenesis

January 14, 2015 4:07 pm | by Sarah Plumridge, Northwestern University | News | Comments

Fibrosis is a constant feature of all chronic liver diseases.                                 

Ancient Fossils Reveal Risk of Parasitic Infections Due to Climate Change

January 13, 2015 4:00 pm | by University of Missouri | News | Comments

Biologists found indications of a greater risk of parasitic infection due to climate change in ancient mollusk fossils.                        

Genetic Predictor of Serious Brain Stroke Complications Discovered

January 13, 2015 3:50 pm | by University of Florida | News | Comments

Researchers have found a possible predictor for little understood -- but often disabling or even fatal -- stroke complications.                       

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Mucus Proteins May Control Asthma

January 13, 2015 3:16 pm | by Nora Dunne, Northwestern University | News | Comments

Scientists have revealed that sugars on a specific mucus protein can induce eosinophil death and help combat asthma.                        

Scientists Create Device for Extracting Tumor Cells from Blood

January 13, 2015 3:13 pm | by UCLA | News | Comments

When 2 milliliters of blood are run through the chip, the tumor cells stick to the nanowires like Velcro.                          

One-Size-Fits-All Approach Can Lead to Diabetes Over-Treatment

January 13, 2015 10:30 am | by Yale | News | Comments

Diabetes treatments have saved many lives, but in older patients with multiple medical conditions, aggressively controlling blood sugar with insulin and sulfonylurea drugs, could lead to over-treatment and hypoglycemia (low blood sugar), according to new research by Yale School of Medicine researchers.                          

What the Nose Knows

January 13, 2015 10:23 am | by CSHL | News | Comments

The nose, of course, knows nothing. The information we gather from the basic odor-detection task performed by molecular receptors in the nose needs to be processed in the brain’s olfactory bulb and olfactory cortex in order for us to make sense of an odor and glean what we need to know to take action. 

Mechanism Insights Into SMA Suggest New Treatment Paths

January 13, 2015 10:07 am | by CSHL | News | Comments

A team of researchers from Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory (CSHL) sheds new light on the underlying pathology of spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), a rare but devastating disease that causes muscle weakness and paralysis and is the leading genetic cause of infant deaths. The newly obtained insights may prove valuable as scientists currently work to define optimal treatment strategies for patients.

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Mutation Maps

January 13, 2015 9:52 am | News | Comments

DNA sequences were once thought to be identical from cell to cell, but it’s increasingly understood that mutations can arise during brain development that affect only certain groups of brain cells.                                          

Genome Sequencing of 200-Year-Old Whales May Help Humans Fight Disease

January 13, 2015 9:07 am | by Cynthia Fox, Science Writer | Articles | Comments

For the first time, the genome of a mammal longer-lived than man has been sequenced: the bowhead whale, who lives 200-plus years, and gets far less cancer given its size.                                       

Hacking Fat Cells' Metabolism Does Not Affect Insulin Resistance

January 12, 2015 9:26 am | by Johns Hopkins University | News | Comments

In the race to find a safe and effective weight loss drug, much attention has focused on the chemical processes that store and use energy.                     

Tracing Cancer Back to Its Origins

January 12, 2015 9:23 am | by Columbia University | News | Comments

The fingers of papillary tumors often grow back after surgery, but flat carcinoma in situ cancers are typically more aggressive and more likely to spread.                  

CDC Pushes Antiviral Meds as Flu Becomes More Widespread

January 12, 2015 8:58 am | by Mike Stobbe - AP Medical Writer | News | Comments

In the midst of a worrisome flu season, health officials are pushing doctors to prescribe antiviral medicines more often.                       

Virtual Reality vs. Real Life: How Brain Neurons Light Up

January 12, 2015 8:56 am | by Cynthia Fox, Science Writer | Articles | Comments

Space-mapping brain neurons do not “light up” in scans when exposed to the virtual reality (VR) at work in kids’ video games, the way they do in the “real world.” The neurons—found in the hippocampus—only mirror the “reality” state some 50 percent of the time.

Brains Keep Memories Tidy By Pruning Innacurate Ones

January 12, 2015 8:52 am | by Princeton University | News | Comments

New research shows that the human brain uses memories to make predictions about what it expects to find in familiar contexts.                       

Biogen Idec, Columbia to Conduct Collaborative Genetics Research

January 12, 2015 8:48 am | by Columbia University | News | Comments

The agreement will integrate genomics research conducted at Columbia with Biogen Idec’s understanding of disease mechanisms and pathways, and expertise in discovering new medicines.             

Sounding Out Speech

January 12, 2015 8:42 am | by Peter Reuell. Harvard Gazette | News | Comments

Among the thorniest challenges in the study of speech perception, the invariance problem was first identified in the 1950s, when scientists began using instruments to analyze spoken language.            

Facial Motion Activates Dedicated Network Within Brain

January 8, 2015 5:15 pm | by The Rockefeller University | News | Comments

A face is more than a static collection of features. A shift in gaze, a tightening of the lips, a tilt of the head, these movements convey important clues to someone’s state of mind. Scientists know that two particularly social and visual creatures, humans and rhesus macaque monkeys, have a network of small areas within their brains that become active when shown still images of faces.

Study Links Common Human Protein to Adverse Parasitic Worm Infections

January 8, 2015 5:10 pm | by University of Calilfornia, Riverside | News | Comments

Worm infections represent a major global public health problem, leading to a variety of debilitating diseases and conditions, such as anemia, elephantiasis, growth retardation and dysentery. Several drugs are available to treat worm infections, but reinfection is high especially in developing countries.

23andMe, Genentech to Collaborate on Parkinson's Data Project

January 8, 2015 1:47 pm | News | Comments

23andMe and Genentech team up to generate whole genome sequencing data for approximately 3,000 people in 23andMe's Parkinson's disease community.                   

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