Advertisement
Disease Research
Subscribe to Disease Research
View Sample

FREE Email Newsletter

Tests Show NFL Brain Damage May Linger, Start Young

February 9, 2015 2:42 pm | by Cynthia Fox, Science Writer | Articles | Comments

After the highly charged Super Bowl, two sobering studies emerged. One unveiled an improved molecular imaging technology that verified—and precisely identified—brain damage in some National Football League (NFL) players. The other study revealed that brain damage can be more severe in NFL players who start playing football before age 12.

Key Process Identified in Brain Development

February 6, 2015 12:29 pm | by Ziba Kashef, Yale University | News | Comments

MicroRNA are the tiny non-coding RNA molecules that help determine whether genes are expressed or silenced.                           

Evaluating Strategies for HIV Vaccinations

February 6, 2015 12:08 pm | by Anne Trafton, MIT | News | Comments

Researchers have revealed new insights into possible ways to vaccinate people to generate potent antibodies of the type that are predicted to offer protection against diverse strains of the highly mutable HIV.         

Advertisement

A Look at Some Vaccine-Related Legislation in Several States

February 6, 2015 11:50 am | by Associated Press | News | Comments

Several state legislatures are debating vaccine-related measures as dozens of people have fallen ill from a measles outbreak that started at Disneyland in December and spread beyond the theme park.           

Highlighting Brain Cells' Role in Navigating Environment

February 5, 2015 3:13 pm | by Dartmouth University | News | Comments

A new Dartmouth College study sheds light on the brain cells that function in establishing one's location and direction. The findings contribute to our understanding of the neural mechanisms underlying our abilities to successfully navigate our environment, which may be crucial to dealing with brain damage due to trauma or a stroke and the onset of diseases such as Alzheimer's.

Unlocking Fat

February 5, 2015 2:57 pm | by Peter Reuell, Harvard | News | Comments

Have you ever wondered why it’s so tough to put down that last slice of bacon? Part of the answer is that humans are evolutionarily programmed to crave fatty foods, which offer the biggest bang for the buck, nutritionally speaking, with more than twice the calorie density of protein- or starch-rich food.

SuperAger Brains Yield New Clues To Memories

February 5, 2015 2:36 pm | by Northwestern | News | Comments

SuperAgers, aged 80 and above, have distinctly different looking brains than those of normal older people, according to new Northwestern Medicine research that is beginning to reveal why the memories of these cognitively elite elders don’t suffer the usual ravages of time.

Tackling Cancer With a New Paradigm

February 5, 2015 2:33 pm | by Yale | News | Comments

In the 1980s, immunotherapy researcher Lieping Chen, M.D., Ph.D., embraced the career goal of curing one cancer. That lofty-seeming goal is beginning to look more modest today. Recent clinical trials have shown that one cancer after another is vulnerable to immune modulation therapy, a cancer-fighting strategy Chen pioneered that for years was considered marginal.

Advertisement

New Source of Cells for Modeling Malaria

February 5, 2015 2:29 pm | by MIT | News | Comments

In 2008, the World Health Organization announced a global effort to eradicate malaria, which kills about 800,000 people every year. As part of that goal, scientists are trying to develop new drugs that target the malaria parasite during the stage when it infects the human liver, which is crucial because some strains of malaria can lie dormant in the liver for several years before flaring up.

7 Myths About the Measles Vaccine

February 5, 2015 2:25 pm | by Columbia Univ. | News | Comments

Since December, more than 100 people in 14 states have been infected with measles in an outbreak traced to Disneyland, Melissa Stockwell, MD, MPH, assistant professor of pediatrics and of population & family health, has spoken out to debunk seven myths about the measles vaccine.

Disneyland Measles Outbreak Isn't Largest in Recent Memory

February 5, 2015 2:23 pm | by Associated Press | News | Comments

The largest U.S. measles outbreak in recent history isn't the one that started in December at Disneyland. It happened months earlier in Ohio's Amish country, where 383 people fell ill after unvaccinated Amish missionaries traveled to the Philippines and returned with the virus.

Brain Marker Hints at Depression, Anxiety Years Later

February 4, 2015 3:08 pm | by Duke University | News | Comments

Researchers said they can tell who will become depressed or anxious in response to stressful life events, as far as four years down the road.                    

Scientists Find More DNA and Extra Copies of Disease Gene in Alzheimer's Brain Cells

February 4, 2015 3:02 pm | by The Scripps Research Institute | News | Comments

Scientists have found diverse genomic changes in single neurons from the brains of Alzheimer’s patients, pointing to an unexpected factor that may underpin the most common form of the disease.            

Advertisement

Ebola Drug Study Canceled Due to Declining Cases

February 4, 2015 2:54 pm | by Associated Press | News | Comments

The drop-off in Ebola infections is good news for Liberia, but it means there are not enough sick people to take part in the study.                      

Federal Health Officials Face Tough Questions on Flu Vaccines

February 4, 2015 2:51 pm | by Lauran Neergard - AP Medical Writer | News | Comments

Federal health officials faced tough questions from lawmakers Tuesday about why they didn't take steps to produce a better flu vaccine as it became clear that this year's version wasn't going to offer much protection.       

Stem Cell Therapy Shows Promise for MS Patients

February 4, 2015 2:41 pm | by Nora Dunne, Northwestern University | News | Comments

A preliminary study suggests stem cell transplantation may reverse disability and improve quality of life for patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis.                

Revolution in Imaging Tech Brings Heart Failure Molecule Into View

February 4, 2015 10:32 am | by Columbia University | News | Comments

Using the same technology that made smartphone cameras possible, scientists at Columbia University Medical Center are capturing images of individual molecules at a level of detail never before possible—including images of a molecule implicated in heart disease and muscle diseases.

How the Brain Ignores Distractions

February 4, 2015 10:23 am | by Brown Univ. | News | Comments

By scanning the brains of people engaged in selective attention to sensations, researchers have learned how the brain appears to coordinate the response needed to ignore distractors. They are now studying whether that ability can be harnessed, for instance to suppress pain.  

Protein Threshold Linked to Parkinson’s Disease

February 4, 2015 10:09 am | by Johns Hopkins | News | Comments

The circumstances in which a protein closely associated with Parkinson’s Disease begins to malfunction and aggregate in the brain have been pinpointed in a quantitative manner for the first time in a new study.                                      

Nanoparticle Gene Therapy Treats Brain Cancer in Rats

February 4, 2015 10:01 am | by Johns Hopkins | News | Comments

Despite improvements in the past few decades with surgery, chemotherapy and radiation therapy, a predictably curative treatment for glioma does not yet exist. New insights into specific gene mutations that arise in this often deadly form of brain cancer have pointed to the potential of gene therapy, but it’s very difficult to effectively deliver toxic or missing genes to cancer cells in the brain.

Beethoven’s Arrhythmias Likely Inspired Some of His Masterpieces

February 3, 2015 1:54 pm | by Cynthia Fox, Science Writer | Articles | Comments

"Washington University cardiologist Zachary Goldberger once made music out of heartbeats. Now, with a Beethoven scholar and a medical historian, he has discovered that three musical compositions that Beethoven created while stressed are arrhythmic in a way mirroring the composer's own probable heart arrhythmias."

Skin based Immunity Secrets Revealed

February 3, 2015 1:46 pm | by University of Melbourne | News | Comments

A team of international scientists has discovered a new mechanism by which immune cells in the skin function act as the body's 'border control', revealing how these cells sense whether lipid or fat-like molecules might indicate the presence of foreign invaders.

Two Genetic Mutations May Interact to Lower Heart Attack Risk

February 3, 2015 1:24 pm | by Ohio State Univ. | News | Comments

Researchers have determined that two mutations on a single gene can interact in a way that lowers the carrier's risk for a heart attack.  The variants are found in a gene called DBH, which regulates an enzyme involved in the conversion of dopamine to norepinephrine - both of which are important chemical messengers and hormones.

Uncovering Genetic Trigger for Immune Response

February 3, 2015 1:06 pm | by Yale University | News | Comments

The thousands of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) molecules present in each cell are known primarily for their role converting food and oxygen into energy. But Yale researchers have identified an unexpected relationship between mtDNA and the innate immune response.

Protective Brain Protein Reveals Gender Implications for Autism, Alzheimer's Research

February 3, 2015 12:56 pm | by Tel Aviv University | News | Comments

A new study by Tel Aviv University's Prof. Illana Gozes, published in Translational Psychiatry, may offer insight into the pathology of both autism and Alzheimer's by revealing that different activities of certain proteins in males and females cause gender-specific tendencies toward these diseases.    

X
You may login with either your assigned username or your e-mail address.
The password field is case sensitive.
Loading