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How Studying Bat Touch Could Help Build Better Planes

May 4, 2015 10:45 am | by Columbia University | News | Comments

A study published April 30 in Cell Reports shows, for the first time, that a unique array of sensory receptors in the wing provides feedback to a bat during flight. The findings also suggest that neurons in the bat brain respond to incoming airflow and touch signals, triggering rapid adjustments in wing position to optimize flight control.

Prolonged Statin Use May Lower Risk of Lung Cancer Death

May 4, 2015 10:26 am | by American Association for Cancer Research | News | Comments

Lung cancer patients who used statins in the year prior to a lung cancer diagnosis or after a lung cancer diagnosis had a reduction in the risk of death from the disease, according to a study published in Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research.

How to Short-Circuit Hunger

May 4, 2015 10:20 am | by Harvard University | News | Comments

Artificially activating a neural link in mice can reduce eating without chronic hunger.

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Vital Step in Stem Cell Growth Revealed

May 4, 2015 10:06 am | by Salk Institute for Biological Studies | News | Comments

Stem cells, which have the potential to turn into any kind of cell, offer the tantalizing possibility of generating new tissues for organ replacements, stroke victims and patients of many other diseases. Now, scientists have uncovered details about stem cell growth that could help improve regenerative therapies.

Researchers Find Bitter Taste Receptors on Human Hearts

May 4, 2015 9:38 am | by University of Queensland | News | Comments

A team of researchers is investigating the surprising discovery that smell and taste receptors normally found in the nose and mouth can also be present on the human heart.

Space madness: Long-term Space Trips Could Impair Astronaut Brains

May 1, 2015 2:59 pm | by Seth Augenstein, Digital Reporter | Articles | Comments

When NASA first began sending astronauts out into space, they worried about “space madness” – a malady they thought weightlessness and claustrophobia would trigger out beyond the atmosphere of the earth. It never materialized. But they may have been on to something.

Researchers Create DNA Repair Map of Entire Human Genome

May 1, 2015 10:20 am | by UNC | News | Comments

The new experimental assay can help scientists find the precise locations of repair of DNA damage caused by UV radiation and common chemotherapies. The invention could lead to better cancer drugs or improvements in the potency of existing ones.

Stem Cells Transplanted, Followed in Brain

May 1, 2015 9:42 am | by Stanford University | News | Comments

The ability to detect successful engraftment, integration and function of human cells implanted into the brain of a living animal could potentially speed stem-cell therapies’ path to clinical use.

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A New Way to Think About Migraines

May 1, 2015 9:28 am | by Bevin Fletcher, Associate Editor | Articles | Comments

This is the second of three research findings highlighted by Dr. Rost, vice chair of the American Academy of Neurology Science Committee, at the AAN 67th annual meeting.

Brain Scan Reveals Out-of-Body Illusion

May 1, 2015 9:20 am | by Karolinska Institutet | News | Comments

The feeling of being inside one’s own body is not as self-evident as one might think. In a new study neuroscientists created an out-of-body illusion in participants placed inside a brain scanner. They then used the illusion to perceptually ‘teleport’ the participants to different locations in a room and show that the perceived location of the bodily self can be decoded from activity patterns in specific brain regions.

World First for Artificial Pancreas Team

April 30, 2015 10:23 am | by University of Cambridge | News | Comments

The first natural birth to a mother with diabetes who has been fitted with an artificial pancreas took place this week.

Foreign Antibodies Fight Cancer

April 30, 2015 10:13 am | by Stanford University | News | Comments

A mouse’s T cells can be primed to attack and eliminate a malignant tumor by injecting antibodies from another mouse with resistance to the tumor, as well as by activating certain signaling cells, a study has found.

How the Brain Tells Good From Bad

April 30, 2015 10:04 am | by Anne Trafton, MIT | News | Comments

Eating a slice of chocolate cake or spending time with a friend usually stimulates positive feelings, while getting in a car accident or anticipating a difficult exam is more likely to generate a fearful or anxious response.

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Is the World Failing in Fight Against Antibiotic Resistance?

April 30, 2015 9:06 am | by Bevin Fletcher, Associate Editor | Articles | Comments

Only 34 out of 133 countries participating in the recent survey of countries in the six WHO regions have a comprehensive national plan to fight resistance to antibiotics and other antimicrobial medicines.

Cardiorespiratory Fitness Contributes to Successful Brain Aging

April 29, 2015 10:08 am | by Boston University | News | Comments

Cardiorespiratory fitness may positively impact the structure of white matter in the brains of older adults. These results suggest that exercise could be prescribed to lessen age-related declines in brain structure.

Genetics Startup Raises $15M to Launch Low-Cost Cancer Tests

April 29, 2015 8:57 am | by Ryan Bushey, Associate Editor | Articles | Comments

The test can assess the risk for breast and ovarian cancer.

Affordable Personalized RNA Cancer Vaccine Works, Aided by CD4 T Cells

April 29, 2015 8:53 am | by Cynthia Fox, Science Writer | News | Comments

A team from Johannes Gutenberg University engineered a relatively cheap, and comparatively easy-to-make, personalized vaccine—and wiped out lung, skin, and colon cancer cells in mice.

Genocea's GEN-003 in Prime Position to Lead GH Vaccine Space

April 28, 2015 1:08 pm | by Daian Cheng, Ph.D., GlobalData Infectious Disease Analyst | Articles | Comments

An analysis of Genocea Biosciences’ investigational genital herpes (GH) vaccine, GEN-003. 

Scientists Uncover Surprising New Details of Potential Alzheimer’s Treatment

April 28, 2015 10:14 am | by TSRI | News | Comments

Scientists have uncovered some surprising details of a group of compounds that have shown significant potential in stimulating the growth of brain cells and memory restoration in animal models that mimic Alzheimer’s disease.

Microneedle Patch for Measles Vaccination Could be Global Game Changer

April 28, 2015 10:08 am | by Georgia Institute of Technology | News | Comments

A new microneedle patch being developed by the Georgia Institute of Technology and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) could make it easier to vaccinate people against measles and other vaccine-preventable diseases.

Researchers ID Brain Mechanisms Underlying Alertness and Attentiveness

April 28, 2015 9:18 am | by MIT | News | Comments

First demonstration that a common neurotransmitter acts via a single neuron type to enable effective information-processing.

Apple's ResearchKit - The Real Impact on Clinical Trials

April 28, 2015 8:59 am | by Merrilyn Datta, Ph.D., President and General Manager, Definiens | Articles | Comments

ResearchKit is being touted as having immense implications for the future of clinical trials.

Gene Associated with Rare Disease Determines How Body Processes Pain

April 28, 2015 8:58 am | by Institut de Recherches Cliniques de Montreal | News | Comments

Researchers uncovered the critical role in pain processing of a gene associated with a rare disease. Their breakthrough, published in The Journal of Neuroscience, paves the way for a better understanding of chronic pain conditions.

AAN 2015 Research Spotlight: A New Compound for Alzheimer’s

April 28, 2015 8:51 am | by Bevin Fletcher, Associate Editor | Articles | Comments

Neurologists from all over the world converged in Washington D.C. last week, with an estimated 13,000 attendees meeting at the 67th annual American Academy of Neurology conference to learn about new research in the field.

Ebola Scare May Inform U.S.'s Response to Bioterrorism

April 28, 2015 8:48 am | by Seth Augenstein, Digital Reporter | Articles | Comments

Last year’s Ebola scare might provide a blueprint for a response to the unthinkable: a bioterrorist attack in the U.S., some experts are saying. A House of Representatives subcommittee last week discussed what the domestic response – and over-response – may teach emergency responders in a “low probability” but “high-consequence” event.

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