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Health Groups Say AIDS No. 1 Killer of Adolescents in Africa

February 17, 2015 3:47 pm | by Tom Odula, Associated Press | News | Comments

Global health organizations said Tuesday that AIDS is now the leading cause of death for adolescents in Africa, and the second leading cause of death among adolescents globally.              

How Technology Can Block Our Creativity

February 17, 2015 2:21 pm | by Ryan Bushey, Associate Editor | Videos | Comments

The Atlantic's James Hamblin explores how our obsession with smartphones could stifle creative impulses.                              

Two Cell-Signaling Molecules Found to Suppress the Spread of Melanoma

February 17, 2015 10:21 am | by NYU Langone | News | Comments

Findings advance efforts to identify who would benefit from more aggressive therapy at earliest stages.                          

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Molecular Inhibitor Breaks Cycle That Leads to Alzheimer's

February 17, 2015 10:15 am | by University of Cambridge | News | Comments

A molecule that can block the progress of Alzheimer’s disease at a crucial stage in its development has been identified by researchers in a new study, raising the prospect that more such molecules may now be found.        

Taking Technology from the Lab to the Patient

February 17, 2015 10:06 am | by Anne Trafton, MIT | News | Comments

A MIT researcher wants to bring advances in drug delivery and biomaterials to the clinic.                            

Researchers Discover Molecular Trigger of IBD

February 17, 2015 10:00 am | by Duke University | News | Comments

Cells lining the intestinal tract form a critical barrier, protecting our bodies from the billions of bacteria living in the gut.                      

Ebola Victims Infectious for a Week After Death, Nonhuman Primate Study Finds

February 13, 2015 4:32 pm | by Elizabeth Doughman, Editor-in-Chief, ALN Magazine | News | Comments

The Ebola virus remains viable for at least seven days after death in non-human primates. A new study, published in Emerging Infectious Diseases, suggests that Ebola transmission from deceased individuals may be possible for an extended period of time after death, underscoring the importance of using safe practices for handling corpses.  

Gambling, Obsessive Compulsive Behaviors Linked

February 13, 2015 3:49 pm | by Bill Hathaway, Yale University | News | Comments

Problem gambling and obsessive-compulsive behaviors share genetic as well as behavioral links, according to a new study.                       

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CDC: Nasty Flu Season has Peaked

February 13, 2015 3:41 pm | by Mike Stobbe, AP Medical Writer | News | Comments

This winter's nasty flu season has peaked and is clearly retreating, a new government report shows.                           

Aggressive Form of HIV Uncovered in Cuba

February 12, 2015 2:42 pm | by University of Leuven | News | Comments

Engaging in unprotected sex with multiple partners increases the risk of contracting multiple strains of HIV, the virus that causes AIDS. Once inside a host, these strains can recombine into a new variant of the virus.       

Microbes Prevent Malnutrition in Fruit Flies - Maybe Humans, too

February 12, 2015 2:33 pm | by The Scripps Research Institute | News | Comments

Microbes, small and ancient life forms, play a key role in maintaining life on Earth. As has often been pointed out, without microbes, we’d die—without us, most microbes would get along just fine.           

Apes Prefer the Glass Half Full

February 12, 2015 2:27 pm | by Duke University | News | Comments

Humans aren’t the only species to be influenced by spin. Our closest primate relatives are susceptible, too.                         

Study Ties More Deaths, Types of Disease, to Smoking

February 12, 2015 2:06 pm | by Marilynn Marchione, Associated Press | News | Comments

Breast cancer, prostate cancer, and even routine infections. A new report ties these and other maladies to smoking and said an additional 60,000 to 120,000 deaths each year in the United States are probably due to tobacco use.      

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Sequence of Genetic Mutations Determines How Cancer Behaves

February 12, 2015 10:15 am | News | Comments

Most of the genetic mutations that cause cancer result from environmental ‘damage’ (for example, through smoking or as a result of over-exposure to sunlight) or from spontaneous errors as cells divide. 

Brain Stents Show Big Promise for Certain Stroke Patients

February 12, 2015 9:53 am | by Associated Press | News | Comments

Stroke experts are reporting a major advance: Stents similar to the ones used to open clogged heart arteries also can be used to clear a blood clot in the brain, greatly lowering the risk a patient will end up disabled.

Scientists Overturn Dogma on Bubonic Plague

February 12, 2015 9:40 am | News | Comments

For decades, scientists have thought the bacteria that cause the bubonic plague hijack host cells at the site of a fleabite and are then taken to the lymph nodes, where the bacteria multiply and trigger severe disease. But UNC School of Medicine researchers discovered that this accepted theory is off base. The bacteria do not use host cells; they traffic to lymph nodes on their own and not in great numbers.

Isolated Systolic Hypertension Indicates Heart Disease Risk for Younger Adults

February 12, 2015 9:32 am | News | Comments

High systolic blood pressure – the top number in a blood pressure reading – has long been considered an indicator of cardiovascular disease risk for adults over 50. But now a new Northwestern Medicine study suggests that it’s also important for younger adults.

Common Biomarkers of Sleep Debt Found in Humans, Rats: Study

February 12, 2015 9:10 am | News | Comments

Stating that sleep is an essential biological process seems as obvious as saying that the sun rises every morning. Yet, researchers' understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying the effects of sleep loss is still in its earliest stages.

Serotonin-Deficient Brains More Vulnerable to Social Stress

February 10, 2015 5:17 pm | by Duke University | News | Comments

Mice genetically deficient in serotonin—a crucial brain chemical implicated in clinical depression—are more vulnerable than their normal littermates to social stressors, according to a Duke study appearing this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Grey Matter Loss from Smoking May be Reversible: Study

February 10, 2015 5:12 pm | News | Comments

Damage to the brain's outer layer caused by smoking may be reversible after quitting, but it could take years, a study said. Brain scans of 500 Scottish septuagenarians confirmed a link between smoking and an acceleration of age-related thinning of the cortex—the outer layer of grey matter, researchers reported.

Plant Extract Fights Brain Tumor

February 10, 2015 5:06 pm | by Max Planck Society | News | Comments

Silibinin has an outstanding safety profile in humans and is currently used for the treatment of liver disease and poisoning.                                                     

Screening Tool Could Speed Ovarian Cancer Drug Development

February 10, 2015 4:56 pm | by University of Chicago | News | Comments

University of Chicago Medicine researchers have built a model system that uses multiple cell types from patients to rapidly test compounds that could block the early steps in ovarian cancer metastasis. Their three-dimensional cell-culture system, adapted for high-throughput screening, has enabled them to identify small molecules that can inhibit adhesion and invasion, preventing ovarian cancers from spreading to nearby tissues.

New Cellular Pathway Defect in Cystinosis

February 10, 2015 4:41 pm | by Scripps Research Institute | News | Comments

Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have identified a new cellular pathway that is affected in cystinosis, a rare genetic disorder that can result in eye and kidney damage.                                 

90 Percent Approve of Cancer Screening But Uptake is Lower

February 10, 2015 4:35 pm | by Cancer Research UK | News | Comments

The researchers, from Cancer Research UK's Health Behaviour Research Centre at University College London (UCL), interviewed almost 1,900 people aged 50-80 years old about their views on cancer screening.                   

Startup Uses Google Glass to Improve Patient-Physician Relationship

February 10, 2015 9:28 am | by Tracie White, Stanford Medical School | News | Comments

Firsthand experience working in hospitals and clinics helped inspire third-year Stanford medical student Pelu Tran to explore a potential career path in the world of high-tech startups.             

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