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Broken Cellular Communication in Brain Contributes to Huntington's Disease Symptoms, Study Finds

April 7, 2015 10:10 am | by Indiana University | News | Comments

Indiana University researchers have found that broken communication in a specific part of the brain plays a role in the involuntary physical movements that affect individuals with Huntington's disease.

Brain's 'Lowly' Visual Processor Is More Sophisticated Than Once Thought

April 7, 2015 9:30 am | by Johns Hopkins | News | Comments

Primary visual cortex can inform decision-making

Using Sound Waves to Detect Rare Cancer Cells

April 7, 2015 9:08 am | by Anne Trafton, MIT | News | Comments

Acoustic device can rapidly isolate circulating tumor cells from patient blood samples.

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Cancer Genes Turned Off in Deadly Brain Cancer

April 6, 2015 2:30 pm | by Marla Paul, Northwestern University | News | Comments

New therapy approach goes directly to the source of cancer development.

Indiana Begins Needle Exchange in County With HIV Outbreak

April 6, 2015 2:16 pm | by Associated Press | News | Comments

Health officials in Indiana on Saturday began a needle-exchange program Saturday in a county where an HIV outbreak among intravenous drug users has grown to nearly 90 cases.

New Genetic Clues Emerge on Origin of Hirschsprung's Disease

April 6, 2015 2:12 pm | by Johns Hopkins | News | Comments

Genetic studies in humans, zebrafish and mice have revealed how two different types of genetic variations team up to cause a rare condition called Hirschsprung’s disease.

Research Links HIV to Age-accelerating Cellular Changes

April 6, 2015 12:33 pm | by Enrique Rivero, UCLA | News | Comments

Study suggests adults infected with HIV can develop age-related diseases a decade earlier than their uninfected peers.

From the Heart

April 6, 2015 11:34 am | by Anne Trafton, MIT | News | Comments

Laurie Boyer’s studies of stem cell differentiation could improve treatments for heart disease.

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Imported Drug-resistant Stomach Bug Spreading in US

April 2, 2015 2:53 pm | by Mike Stobbe, AP Medical Writer | News | Comments

A drug-resistant strain of a nasty stomach bug made its way into the U.S. and spread, causing more than 200 illnesses since last May, health officials said Thursday.

Diagnosis By Keyboard

April 2, 2015 9:42 am | by Anne Trafton, MIT | News | Comments

By revealing loss of motor skills, typing patterns may help to identify early onset of Parkinson’s.

Experimental Cancer Drug Restores Memory in Mouse Model of Alzheimer’s

April 1, 2015 11:07 am | by Bill Hathaway, Yale University | News | Comments

Memory and as well as connections between brain cells were restored in mice with a model of Alzheimer’s given an experimental cancer drug.

Researchers Identify “Beige” Fat-Burning Cells in Humans

April 1, 2015 10:57 am | by Steve Tokar, UC San Francisco | News | Comments

For the first time, a research team, led by a UC San Francisco biologist, has isolated energy-burning “beige” fat from adult humans, which is known to be able to convert unhealthy white fat into healthy brown fat. The scientists also found new genetic markers of this beige fat.

To Statin or Not to Statin?

April 1, 2015 10:11 am | by Johns Hopkins | News | Comments

Johns Hopkins report offers physicians tips to help patients make the right call.

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Intelligent Neuroprostheses Mimic Natural Motor Control

March 31, 2015 4:22 pm | by Cognitive Neuroscience Society | News | Comments

Neuroscientists are taking inspiration from natural motor control to design new prosthetic devices that can better replace limb function. In new work, researchers have tested a range of brain-controlled devices - from wheelchairs to robots to advanced limbs - that work with their users to intelligently perform tasks.

Researchers Build Brain-Machine Interface to Control Prosthetic Hand

March 31, 2015 4:13 pm | by University of Houston | News | Comments

A research team from the University of Houston has created an algorithm that allowed a man to grasp a bottle and other objects with a prosthetic hand, powered only by his thoughts.

Medieval Remedy Found to be Highly Effective Against MRSA

March 31, 2015 3:52 pm | by Stephanie Guzowski, Editor | News | Comments

British researchers recently found that a thousand-year-old Anglo-Saxon treatment for eye infections works as an antibiotic against MRSA. MRSA kills more than 5,000 people each year in the U.S. Read more...

How Immune Cells Facilitate the Spread of Breast Cancer

March 30, 2015 5:10 pm | News | Comments

The body's immune system fights disease, infections and even cancer, acting like foot soldiers to protect against invaders and dissenters. 

Fasting, Less-Toxic Cancer Drug May Work as Well as Chemotherapy

March 30, 2015 5:05 pm | by USC | News | Comments

Fasting in combination with chemotherapy has already been shown to kill cancer cells, but a pair of new studies in mice suggests that a less-toxic class of drugs combined with fasting may kill breast, colorectal and lung cancer cells equally well.

Blood-Based Biomarkers could Enable Accurate TB tests for Diagnosis

March 30, 2015 4:57 pm | News | Comments

Researchers have identified blood-based biomarkers in patients with active tuberculosis (ATB) that could lead to new blood-based diagnostics and tools for monitoring treatment response and cure.

MRI based on Sugar Molecule Can Tell Cancerous from Noncancerous Cells

March 30, 2015 4:51 pm | by Johns Hopkins University | News | Comments

Imaging tests like mammograms or CT scans can detect tumors, but figuring out whether a growth is or isn’t cancer usually requires a biopsy to study cells directly.

Low Vitamin D Linked to Worse Prognosis in Type of Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

March 30, 2015 4:41 pm | by University of Rochester | News | Comments

A new study found that people with lower vitamin D levels prior to treatment for follicular lymphoma succumb to the disease or face relapse earlier than patients with sufficient vitamin D levels in their blood.

Body’s Good Fat Tissue Communicates With Brain Through Sensory Nerves

March 27, 2015 3:50 pm | by Georgia State University | News | Comments

Brown fat tissue, the body’s “good fat,” communicates with the brain through sensory nerves, possibly sharing information that is important for fighting human obesity, such as how much fat we have and how much fat we’ve lost.

Playing Music By Professional Musicians Activates Genes For Learning and Memory

March 27, 2015 3:36 pm | by University of Helsinki | News | Comments

Playing music by professional musicians activates genes responsible for brain function and singing of songbirds.

Disrupted Biological Clock Linked to Alzheimer's

March 27, 2015 3:21 pm | by Oregon State University | News | Comments

New research has identified some of the processes by which molecules associated with neurological diseases can disrupt the biological clock, interfere with sleep and activity patterns, and set the stage for a spiral of health concerns that can include a decreased lifespan and Alzheimer’s disease.

HIV Can Lodge Quickly in Brain After Infection

March 27, 2015 3:15 pm | by Bill Hathaway, Yale University | News | Comments

HIV can establish itself in the brain as soon as four months after initial infection.

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