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Metabolic Enzyme Stops Progression of Kidney Cancer

July 21, 2014 1:52 pm | News | Comments

In an analysis of metabolites used by the body to make fuel in normal and cancerous cells in human kidney tissue, a research team identified an enzyme that is key to applying the brakes on tumor growth.              

Missing Sleep May Hurt Your Memory

July 21, 2014 1:32 pm | News | Comments

Lack of sleep, already considered a public health epidemic, can also lead to errors in memory, finds a new study by researchers at Michigan State University and the University of California, Irvine. The study found participants deprived of a night’s sleep were more likely to flub the details of a simulated burglary they were shown in a series of images.

Common Gene Variants Account for Most Genetic Risk for Autism

July 21, 2014 11:26 am | News | Comments

Most of the genetic risk for autism comes from versions of genes that are common in the population rather than from rare variants or spontaneous glitches, researchers have found. Heritability also outweighed other risk factors in this largest study of its kind to date.

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New Findings Show Early Seeding of HIV Viral Reservoir

July 21, 2014 11:13 am | News | Comments

A research team has demonstrated that the viral reservoir of HIV-1 infection is established strikingly early after intrarectal simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) infection of rhesus monkeys and before detectable viremia.         

Scientists Find New Clues to Brain’s Wiring

July 18, 2014 2:14 pm | News | Comments

New research provides an intriguing glimpse into the processes that establish connections between nerve cells in the brain. These synapses allow nerve cells to transmit and process information involved in thinking and moving the body.     

Managing Ecosystems via Genomics

July 18, 2014 2:11 pm | News | Comments

A cross-disciplinary team is calling for public discussion about a potential new way to solve longstanding global ecological problems by using an emerging technology called “gene drives.” The advance could potentially lead to powerful new ways of combating malaria and other insect-borne diseases.

New Gene Discovered that Stops the Spread of Deadly Cancer

July 18, 2014 2:01 pm | Videos | Comments

Scientists at the Salk Institute have identified a gene responsible for stopping the movement of cancer from the lungs to other parts of the body, indicating a new way to fight one of the world's deadliest cancers. By identifying the cause of this metastasis—which often happens quickly in lung cancer and results in a bleak survival rate—Salk scientists are able to explain why some tumors are more prone to spreading than others.

'Support Cells' in Brain Play Important Role in Down Syndrome

July 18, 2014 1:36 pm | News | Comments

Researchers have identified a group of cells in the brain that they say plays an important role in the abnormal neuron development in Down syndrome. After developing a new model for studying the syndrome using patient-derived stem cells, the scientists also found that applying an inexpensive antibiotic to the cells appears to correct many abnormalities in the interaction between the cells and developing neurons.

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Gene Variation May Modify Cardiovascular Benefit of Aspirin

July 18, 2014 1:01 pm | News | Comments

A daily low-dose aspirin is widely prescribed for the prevention of cardiovascular disease. Now, a new study suggests that common genetic variation may modify the cardiovascular benefit of aspirin.                

Researchers Uncover New Cancer Cell Vulnerability

July 18, 2014 12:52 pm | News | Comments

Researchers have uncovered a genetic vulnerability of cancer cells that express telomerase— an enzyme that drives their unchecked growth— and showed that telomerase-expressing cells depend upon a gene named p21 for their survival.      

Gene linked to Fatal Inflammatory Disease in Children Identified

July 17, 2014 11:46 am | News | Comments

Investigators have identified a gene that underlies a very rare but devastating autoinflammatory condition in children. Several existing drugs have shown therapeutic potential in laboratory studies, and one is currently being studied in children with the disease, which the researchers named STING-associated vasculopathy with onset in infancy (SAVI).

One Injection Stops Diabetes in Its Tracks

July 17, 2014 11:03 am | Videos | Comments

In mice with diet-induced diabetes, the equivalent of type 2 diabetes in humans, a single injection of the protein FGF1 is enough to restore blood sugar levels to a healthy range for more than two days, according to a new study.       

How Cannabis Causes Paranoia

July 17, 2014 10:45 am | News | Comments

The largest study of the effects of the main ingredient of cannabis has shown definitively that it can cause short-term paranoia. The research also, for the first time, identifies psychological factors that can lead to feelings of paranoia in people who take cannabis.

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Scientists Find Way to Trap, Kill Malaria Parasite

July 17, 2014 10:20 am | News | Comments

Scientists may be able to entomb the malaria parasite in a prison of its own making, researchers at are reporting. The malaria parasite is among the world’s deadliest pathogens.                     

300 Vials Labeled Influenza, Dengue Found at Lab

July 16, 2014 6:20 pm | by Matthew Perrone - AP Health Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

The same federal scientist who recently found forgotten samples of smallpox at a federal lab also uncovered over 300 additional vials, many bearing the names of highly contagious viruses and bacteria.               

Transplantation of Healthy New Brain Cells Reverses Learning and Memory Loss in Alzheimer’s Disease Model

July 16, 2014 2:10 pm | News | Comments

A new study from the Gladstone Institutes has revealed a way to alleviate the learning and memory deficits caused by apoE4, the most important genetic risk factor for Alzheimer’s disease, improving cognition to normal levels in aged mice.

Team Studies Immune Response of Asian Elephants Infected with a Human Disease

July 16, 2014 1:51 pm | News | Comments

Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the organism that causes tuberculosis in humans, also afflicts Asian elephants. Diagnosing and treating elephants with TB is a challenge, however, as little is known about how their immune systems respond to the infection. A new study begins to address this knowledge gap, and offers new tools for detecting and monitoring TB in captive elephants.

Taking B Vitamins Won’t Prevent Alzheimer’s

July 16, 2014 11:31 am | News | Comments

Taking B vitamins doesn't slow mental decline as we age, nor is it likely to prevent Alzheimer's disease, conclude researchers who have assembled all the best clinical trial data involving 22,000 people to offer a final answer on this debate.   

Making People Smarter Through Brain Stimulation

July 16, 2014 11:10 am | News | Comments

Brain stimulation used to be just a cool idea in science fiction movies, novels and other hard to believe tales when human subjects were stimulated using electrical currents and achieved near super-human feats. Now, brain stimulation is a step closer to becoming a possible reality.

Protein's 'Hands' Enable Bacteria to Establish Infection

July 16, 2014 10:01 am | News | Comments

When it comes to infecting humans and animals, bacteria need a helping hand. Biochemists have found the helping hand: groups of tiny protein loops on the surface of cells.                       

Breaking News: Mutant Worms Can’t Get Drunk

July 16, 2014 8:30 am | News | Comments

Neuroscientists have generated mutant worms that do not get intoxicated by alcohol, a result that could lead to new drugs to treat the symptoms of people going through alcohol withdrawal.                   

New Brain Protein Tied to Alzheimer's Disease

July 16, 2014 3:20 am | by Marilynn Marchione - AP Chief Medical Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

Scientists have linked a new protein to Alzheimer's disease, different from the amyloid and tau that make up the sticky brain plaques and tangles long known to be its hallmarks.                      

Study Pinpoints Damage Alcohol Causes to the Brain

July 15, 2014 12:55 pm | News | Comments

New research has identified, for the first time, the structural damage at a molecular level that excessive alcohol abuse causes to the brain. The study detected the loss and modification of several key cellular proteins in the brains of alcoholics.

Babies’ Brains Rehearse Speech Before First Words

July 15, 2014 12:39 pm | News | Comments

Research in seven- and 11-month-old infants shows that speech sounds stimulate areas of the brain that coordinate and plan motor movements for speech. The study suggests that baby brains start laying down the groundwork of how to form words long before they actually begin to speak.

Proof: Parkinson's Enhances Creativity

July 15, 2014 12:11 pm | News | Comments

Two years ago, the exceptional creativity of Parkinson's patients was demonstrated in a review for Behavioral Neuroscience. Now, a new empirical study definitively demonstrates that Parkinson's patients are more creative than their healthy peers.

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