Advertisement
Disease Research
Subscribe to Disease Research
View Sample

FREE Email Newsletter

The Aging Brain Needs REST

March 24, 2014 2:39 pm | News | Comments

Why do neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s affect only the elderly? More than a century of research into the causes of dementia has focused on the clumps and tangles of abnormal proteins that appear in the brains of people with neurodegenerative diseases. However, scientists know that at least one piece of the puzzle has been missing because some people with these abnormal protein clumps show few or no signs of cognitive decline.

Switching an Antibiotic On and Off with Light

March 21, 2014 1:43 pm | News | Comments

Scientists of the KIT and the University of Kiev have produced an antibiotic, whose biological activity can be controlled with light. Thanks to the robust diarylethene photoswitch, the antimicrobial effect of the peptide mimetic can be applied in a spatially and temporally specific manner. This might open up new options for the treatment of local infections, as side effects are reduced.

Genome-wide Association Studies Mislead on Cardiac Arrhythmia Risk Gene

March 21, 2014 1:15 pm | News | Comments

Although genome-wide association studies have linked DNA variants in the gene SCN10A with increased risk for cardiac arrhythmia, efforts to determine the gene's direct influence on the heart's electrical activity have been unproductive. Now, scientists have discovered that these SCN10A variants regulate the function of a different gene, SCN5A, which appears to be the primary gene responsible for cardiac arrhythmia risk.

Advertisement

Potential Lung Cancer Vaccine Shows Renewed Promise

March 21, 2014 12:09 pm | News | Comments

Researchers at UC Davis have found that the investigational cancer vaccine tecemotide, when administered with the chemotherapeutic cisplatin, boosted immune response and reduced the number of tumors in mice with lung cancer. The study also found that radiation treatments did not significantly impair the immune response.

Catching the Early Spread of Breast Cancer

March 20, 2014 1:30 pm | News | Comments

When cancer spreads from one part of the body to another, it becomes even more deadly. It moves with stealth and can go undetected for months or years. But a new technology that uses “nano-flares” has the potential to catch these lurking, mobilized tumor cells early on. Scientists presented the latest advances in nano-flare technology as it applies to the detection of metastatic breast cancer cells.

Potential New Therapeutic Target Identified to Control High Blood Sugar

March 20, 2014 1:12 pm | News | Comments

A UT Southwestern Medical Center study identified a new potential therapeutic target for controlling high blood sugar, a finding that could help the estimated 25 million Americans with type 2 diabetes. Researchers showed that lipid molecules called phosphatidic acids enhance glucose production in the liver. These findings suggest that inhibiting or reducing production of phosphatidic acids may do the opposite.

IBM's Watson to Help in Brain Cancer Research

March 19, 2014 3:18 pm | by Bree Fowler - AP Technology Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

IBM is teaming up with the New York Genome Center to help fight brain cancer. The company said that its Watson cloud computing system will be used in partnership with a New York-based genetic research center to help develop treatments for glioblastoma, the most common type of brain cancer in U.S. adults.

Gut Bacteria Can Cause Life-threatening Infections in Preterm Babies

March 19, 2014 1:24 pm | News | Comments

Babies born prematurely are surviving in increasing numbers. But many withstand complications of early birth only to suffer late-onset sepsis—life-threatening bloodstream infections that strike after infants reach 72 hours of age. While early-onset sepsis often is caused by pathogens acquired from the amniotic sac or birth canal, the causes of late-onset sepsis have been far less clear.

Advertisement

Building Heart Tissue that Beats

March 19, 2014 11:59 am | News | Comments

When a heart gets damaged, such as during a major heart attack, there’s no easy fix. But scientists working on a way to repair the vital organ have now engineered tissue that closely mimics natural heart muscle that beats, not only in a lab dish but also when implanted into animals.

Lost Sleep Leads to Lost Neurons

March 19, 2014 11:34 am | News | Comments

Using a mouse model of chronic sleep loss, a new Penn Medicine study shows disturbing evidence that chronic sleep loss may be more serious than previously thought and may even lead to irreversible physical damage to and loss of brain cells.

Cardiologists Define New Heart Failure Symptom: Shortness of Breath While Bending Over

March 19, 2014 10:56 am | News | Comments

UT Southwestern Medical Center cardiologists have defined a novel heart failure symptom in advanced heart failure patients: shortness of breath while bending over, such as when putting on shoes. The condition, which UT Southwestern cardiologists named “bendopnea,” is an easily detectable symptom that can help doctors diagnose excessive fluid retention in patients with heart failure.

Scientists Slow Development of Alzheimer's Trademark Cell-killing Plaques

March 18, 2014 2:44 pm | Videos | Comments

University of Michigan researchers have learned how to fix a cellular structure called the Golgi that mysteriously becomes fragmented in all Alzheimer's patients and appears to be a major cause of the disease. They say that understanding this mechanism helps decode amyloid plaque formation in the brains of Alzheimer's patients.

Bacterial Reporters that Get the Scoop

March 18, 2014 2:36 pm | News | Comments

Problems arise when bad gut bacteria overtake friendly ones, or when the immune system is thrown off balance, as in Crohn's disease, celiac disease, and colorectal cancer. Doctors have struggled to diagnose these conditions early and accurately. But now a new engineered strain of E. coli bacteria could deliver status updates from this complex landscape to help keep gastrointestinal diseases at bay.

Advertisement

Breaking News: Dark Chocolate Health Mystery Solved

March 18, 2014 2:30 pm | News | Comments

The health benefits of eating dark chocolate have been extolled for centuries, but the exact reason has remained a mystery. Now, researchers are reporting that certain bacteria in the stomach gobble dark chocolate and ferment it into anti-inflammatory compounds that are good for the heart. 

New Evidence Raises Questions About the Link Between Fatty Acids and Heart Disease

March 18, 2014 2:27 pm | News | Comments

A new study raises questions about current guidelines which generally restrict the consumption of saturated fats and encourage consumption of polyunsaturated fats to prevent heart disease. Researchers analyzed existing cohort studies and randomized trials on coronary risk and fatty acid intake. They showed that current evidence does not support guidelines that restrict the consumption of saturated fats in order to prevent heart disease.

Archaeologists Discover the Earliest Complete Example of a Human with Cancer

March 18, 2014 2:10 pm | News | Comments

Archaeologists have found the oldest complete example in the world of a human with metastatic cancer in a 3,000 year-old skeleton. The skeleton of the young adult male was found by a Durham University PhD student in a tomb in modern Sudan in 2013 and dates back to 1200BC.

How the Science of Deer Hunting Can Help Patients with Diabetes

March 17, 2014 2:35 pm | News | Comments

Body odor is a deer hunter’s worst enemy, an alert to animals that an ominous presence is lurking, but the science behind suppressing it to give hunters an edge oddly enough could help researchers develop a life-saving device for diabetes patients.

Fighting Antibiotic Resistance with ‘Molecular Drill Bits’

March 17, 2014 2:10 pm | News | Comments

In response to drug-resistant “superbugs” that send millions of people to hospitals around the world, scientists are building tiny, “molecular drill bits” that kill bacteria by bursting through their protective cell walls. They presented some of the latest developments on these drill bits, better known to scientists as antimicrobial peptides (AMPs).

Cancer Therapy May Be Too Targeted

March 17, 2014 2:01 pm | News | Comments

Researchers have identified two novel cancer genes that are associated with the development of a rare, highly aggressive, cancer of blood vessels. These genes may now act as markers for future treatments and explain why narrowly targeted therapies that are directed at just one target fail.

Novel Approach Finds New Gene Linked to Heart Attack Risk

March 17, 2014 11:56 am | News | Comments

Scientists have discovered a previously unrecognized gene variation that makes humans have healthier blood lipid levels and reduced risk of heart attacks- a finding that opens the door to new testing or treatment of high cholesterol and other lipid disorders.

Major ‘Third-hand Smoke’ Compound Causes DNA Damage

March 17, 2014 11:43 am | News | Comments

Scientists are reporting that one compound from “third-hand smoke,” which forms when second-hand smoke reacts with indoor air, damages DNA and sticks to it in a way that could potentially cause cancer.              

Study to Test 'Chocolate' Pills for Heart Health

March 17, 2014 2:16 am | by Marilynn Marchione - AP Chief Medical Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

It won't be nearly as much fun as eating candy bars, but a big study is being launched to see if pills containing the nutrients in dark chocolate can help prevent heart attacks and strokes.                 

Brain Mapping Confirms Patients with Schizophrenia Have Impaired Ability to Imitate

March 14, 2014 2:21 pm | News | Comments

The results of a brain-mapping experiment conducted by a team of neuroscientists at Vanderbilt University strengthen the theory that an impaired ability to imitate may underlie the profound and enduring difficulty with social interactions that characterize schizophrenia.

Halting Immune Response Could Save Brain Cells After Stroke

March 14, 2014 1:57 pm | News | Comments

A new study in animals shows that using a compound to block the body’s immune response greatly reduces disability after a stroke. The study also showed that particular immune cells—CD4+ T-cells produce a mediator, called interleukin (IL)-21 that can cause further damage in stroke tissue.

Gene Family Proven to Suppress Prostate Cancer

March 14, 2014 1:45 pm | News | Comments

Cornell researchers report they have discovered direct genetic evidence that a family of genes, called MicroRNA-34 (miR-34), are bona fide tumor suppressors. Previous research has shown that another gene, called p53, acts to positively regulate miR-34. Mutations of p53 have been implicated in half of all cancers. miR-34 is also frequently silenced by mechanisms other than p53 in many cancers, including those with p53 mutations.

X
You may login with either your assigned username or your e-mail address.
The password field is case sensitive.
Loading