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3rd Doctor Dies from Ebola in Sierra Leone

August 27, 2014 10:23 am | by Clarence Roy-Macaulay - Associated Press - Associated Press | News | Comments

A third top doctor has died from Ebola in Sierra Leone, a government official said Wednesday, as health workers tried to determine how a fourth scientist also contracted the disease before being evacuated to Europe.           

DIY Blood Pressure Care Can Beat MDs

August 27, 2014 8:24 am | by Lindsey Tanner - AP Medical Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

"Do-it-yourself" blood pressure measurements and medicine changes work better than usual doctor-office care in some patients, a study of older adults in England found.                        

Japan Sees First Local Dengue Case in Over 60 Years

August 27, 2014 12:22 am | by The Associated Press | News | Comments

Japanese health authorities have reported the first locally transmitted case of dengue fever in the country in more than 60 years. The ministry says the case occurred in Saitama, a prefecture adjacent to Tokyo.            

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Fiber-based Ingredient Can Make You Eat Less

August 26, 2014 2:05 pm | News | Comments

Scientists have demonstrated the effectiveness of a fiber-based dietary ingredient that makes people feel less hungry and consume less food. Tthe new product  consists of a combination of dietary fiber sources including a viscous hydrocolloid and a whole-grain corn flour rich in resistant starch.

Cancer Leaves a Common Fingerprint on DNA

August 26, 2014 1:45 pm | News | Comments

Regardless of their stage or type, cancers appear to share a telltale signature of widespread changes to the so-called epigenome, according to a team of researchers. In a study of a broad variety of cancers the investigators say they have found widespread and distinctive changes to chemical marks known as methyl groups attached to DNA.

Sorting Cells with Sound Waves

August 26, 2014 1:29 pm | Videos | Comments

Researchers have devised a new way to separate cells by exposing them to sound waves as they flow through a tiny channel. Their device could be used to detect the extremely rare tumor cells that circulate in cancer patients’ blood.     

Crohn's Gene Discovery May Lead to Better Screening

August 26, 2014 1:23 pm | News | Comments

Scientists have identified chemical changes in the DNA of patients with Crohn’s disease that could help to screen people for the disease. These changes can be detected in blood samples, opening the door to a simple test for Crohn’s disease.    

Protein Inhibits HIV Release

August 26, 2014 12:20 pm | News | Comments

The TIM family of proteins that promotes virus entry into cells also has the ability to block the release of HIV and other viruses, researchers have found.                           

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Amid ALS Mania, Possible Drug Target Spotted

August 26, 2014 11:41 am | by Cynthia Fox | Articles | Comments

As, all around them, everyone from Derek Jeter to the Kennedy family was dousing themselves in ice water for the ALS “Ice Bucket Challenge,” Harvard researchers announced last week they may have found an ALS therapy— or two.       

Exercise Can Impact Breast Cancer Risk

August 25, 2014 3:38 pm | by Cynthia Fox | Articles | Comments

A large new study found that when post-menopausal women stop physical activity, their odds of developing breast cancer rise. But, the study also found that breast cancer risk drops surprisingly rapidly after exercise starts.                  

Driving Brain Rhythm Makes Mice More Sensitive to Touch

August 25, 2014 1:46 pm | News | Comments

In a new study, researchers show that they could make faint sensations more vivid by triggering a brain rhythm that appears to shift sensory attention.                             

Virus, Zebrafish Enable Scientists to Map Living Brain

August 25, 2014 1:35 pm | News | Comments

A virus and a zebrafish are helping scientists map the living brain. The model will help show how brain wiring is laid and how it functions.                                

New Approach Helps to Identify Cancer 'Drivers'

August 25, 2014 1:13 pm | News | Comments

Researchers have developed a new integrated approach to pinpoint the genetic “drivers” of cancer, uncovering eight genes that could be viable for targeted breast cancer therapy.                     

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Eye Implant Monitors Glaucoma

August 25, 2014 12:39 pm | News | Comments

For the 2.2 million Americans battling glaucoma, the main course of action for staving off blindness involves weekly visits to eye specialists who conttol increasing pressure within the eye. Now, a tiny eye implant could enable patients to take more frequent readings from the comfort of home.

Liberia: Doctor Given Experimental Ebola Drug Dies

August 25, 2014 11:56 am | by Jonathan Paye-Layleh, Associated Press | News | Comments

A Liberian doctor who was among three Africans to receive an experimental Ebola drug has died, the country's information minister said Monday, as a top U.N. delegation promised more help for countries battling the virulent disease during a visit to Sierra Leone. 

E-cigarettes Might Help Smokers Quit, AHA Says

August 25, 2014 1:22 am | by Marilynn Marchione - AP Chief Medical Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

The American Heart Association's first policy statement on electronic cigarettes backs them as a last resort to help smokers quit. The American Cancer Society has no formal policy but quietly took a similar stance in May.          

BST This Week #10: Gene Mutation Key to High-Altitude Living

August 22, 2014 1:38 pm | Videos | Comments

On this episode of Bioscience Technology This Week, Christina Jakubowski covers a genetic mutation that allows high-altitude-dwelling Tibetans to survive in the peaks of the Tibetan Plateau. Our second story looks at how minor infections increase stroke risk in children.

Are Three Brain Imaging Techniques Better than One?

August 22, 2014 1:13 pm | News | Comments

To date, almost all studies of autism in children have used a single imaging technique to explore connectivity. None has been able to capture a robust picture of the brain abnormalities associated with autism— until now. Researchers are combining three imaging techniques and harnessing the best of each one.

Laser Device May End Pin Pricks for Diabetics

August 22, 2014 12:12 pm | News | Comments

Researchers have developed a way to use a laser to measure people's blood sugar, and, with more work to shrink the laser system to a portable size, the technique could allow diabetics to check their condition without pricking themselves to draw blood.

Skin Cells Reprogrammed to Mimic Rare Disease

August 22, 2014 11:38 am | News | Comments

Stem cell biologists have found a way to reprogram a patient’s skin cells into cells that mimic and display many biological features of a rare genetic disorder called familial dysautonomia.                  

Autistic Children Have Extra Brain Synapses

August 22, 2014 11:23 am | Videos | Comments

Children and adolescents with autism have a surplus of synapses in the brain, and this excess is due to a slowdown in a normal brain “pruning” process during development, according to a new study.                

8 Questions About the Recovered U.S. Ebola Patients

August 22, 2014 8:30 am | by Mike Stobbe - AP Medical Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

Two American aid workers have recovered from Ebola and left an Atlanta hospital, after weeks of intensive treatment in a special isolation unit. They were first two Ebola patients ever brought to the United States.           

Combining Vaccines Boosts Polio Immunity

August 22, 2014 8:22 am | by Lauran Neergaard - AP Medical Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

New research suggests a one-two punch could help battle polio in some of the world's most remote and strife-torn regions: Giving a single vaccine shot to children who've already swallowed drops of an oral polio vaccine greatly boosted their immunity.

Severing Nerves May Shrink Stomach Cancers

August 21, 2014 11:07 am | News | Comments

Research shows that nerves may play a critical role in stomach cancer growth and that blocking nerve signals using surgery or Botox (onabotulinumtoxinA) could be an effective treatment for the disease.              

Scientists Discover Brain Area Responsible for Exercise Motivation

August 21, 2014 11:01 am | News | Comments

Scientists have discovered an area of the brain that could control a person’s motivation to exercise and participate in other rewarding activities, potentially leading to improved treatments for depression.             

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