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New Discovery in Living Cell Signaling

July 7, 2014 3:05 pm | News | Comments

A breakthrough discovery into how living cells process and respond to chemical information could help advance the development of treatments for a large number of cancers and other cellular disorders that have been resistant to therapy. An international collaboration of researchers unlocked the secret behind the activation of the Ras family of proteins.

Blocking Cells’ Movement to Stop the Spread of Cancer

July 7, 2014 2:53 pm | News | Comments

Insights into how cells move through the body could lead to innovative techniques to stop cancer cells from spreading and causing secondary tumors, according to new UCL research. Scientists discovered that cells can change into an invasive, liquid-like state to readily navigate the narrow channels in our body.

First Cancer Immunotherapy for Dogs Developed

July 7, 2014 2:51 pm | News | Comments

A few therapies derived from human medicine are available for dogs, but a very successful form of therapy by which antibodies inhibit tumor growth has not yet been available for animals. Now, scientists have developed, for the first time, antibodies to treat cancer in dogs.

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Schizophrenia-associated Gene Variation Affects Brain Cell Development

July 7, 2014 2:46 pm | News | Comments

Researchers have begun to connect the dots between a schizophrenia-linked genetic variation and its effect on the developing brain. Their experiments show that the loss of a particular gene alters the skeletons of developing brain cells, which in turn disrupts the orderly layers those cells would normally form.

High Cholesterol Linked to Breast Cancer Risk

July 7, 2014 11:57 am | News | Comments

An association between high blood cholesterol and breast cancer has been found in a study of more than 1 million patients over a 14-year time period in the UK.                          

Pseudogenes May Provide Clearer Understanding of Biomarkers

July 7, 2014 11:36 am | News | Comments

Researchers completed a study that generated pseudogene expression profiles in 2,808 patient samples representing seven cancer types. The results indicated that the science of pseudogene expression analysis may very well play a key role in explaining how cancer occurs.

Scientists Find Key Piece in Brain Tumor Puzzle

July 7, 2014 11:22 am | News | Comments

Scientists have shown that a member of the protein family known as SUMO (small ubiquitin-like modifier) is a key to why tumor cells multiply uncontrollably, especially in the case of glioblastoma.                

Proton Therapy Has Advantages Over IMRT

July 3, 2014 8:30 am | Videos | Comments

A new study by radiation oncologists has found that proton beam therapy significantly improved disease free survival and tumor control when compared to IMRT in a variety of advanced head and neck cancers.               

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Upending a Cancer Dogma

July 2, 2014 1:30 pm | News | Comments

Researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine say a protein essential to regulating cell cycle progression – the process of cell division and replication – activates a key tumor suppressor, rather than inactivating it as previously thought.

Treasure Trove of Genes Key to Kidney Cancer

July 2, 2014 9:24 am | Videos | Comments

A genomic analysis of clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC), the most common form of kidney cancer, from 72 patients has uncovered 31 genes that are key to development, growth and spread of the cancer, according to researchers.      

Lead in Kids’ Blood Linked to Behavioral, Emotional Issues

July 2, 2014 9:17 am | News | Comments

Emotional and behavioral problems show up even with low exposure to lead, and as blood lead levels increase in children, so do the problems, according to new research.                       

Addiction Starts with an Overcorrection in the Brain

July 1, 2014 4:48 pm | News | Comments

The National Institutes of Health has turned to neuroscientists at the nation’s most “Stone Cold Sober” university for help finding ways to treat drug and alcohol addiction. Brigham Young University professor Scott Steffensen and his collaborators have published three new scientific papers that detail the brain mechanisms involved with addictive substances. 

NIH Creates Network to Tackle Mysterious Diseases

July 1, 2014 4:20 pm | by Lauran Neergaard - AP Medical Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

The government is expanding its "mystery disease" program, funding a network at six universities around the country to help diagnose patients with diseases so rare they've been told they're undiagnosable. The National Institutes of Health has evaluated hundreds of these cold-case patients in its campus research hospital as part of a pilot program since 2008. Demand is so great, there's a waiting list.  

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Stem Cells Halt MS for Two Years

July 1, 2014 12:07 pm | by Cynthia Fox | Articles | Comments

At 21, MS had Jennifer Molson “wheelchair bound.” But since her stem cell transplant, she has worked, driven, danced at her own wedding. The story had a room of 1,000 professional stem cell scientists sniffling loudly at the International Society for Stem Cell Research (ISSCR) meeting—said sniffling reaching a crescendo when the quiet, pretty Molson concluded: “I’m living proof stem cells can save lives.”

Four in Ten Pancreatic Cancers Could be Prevented by Lifestyle Changes

July 1, 2014 11:49 am | News | Comments

Almost 40 percent of pancreatic cancers– one of the deadliest forms of cancer– could be avoided in the UK through maintaining a healthy weight and not smoking, according to new research.                   

Unsuspected Aspect of Immune Regulation Revealed

July 1, 2014 11:35 am | News | Comments

A discovery by Australian immunologists uncovered an additional role for antibody-making ‘B cells.’ The finding shows that B cells also participate in the development of ‘regulatory T cells.’ Until now, the only non-thymic cells known to educate the regulators were dendritic cells, which travel to the thymus to deliver ‘antigen’, samples of substances toxic to the body. We now know that B cells can do the same thing.

Cancer Risk: Aspirin and Smoking Affect Aging of Genes

July 1, 2014 11:23 am | News | Comments

The risk of developing cancer increases with age. Factors like smoking and regular aspirin use also affect the risk of cancer—although in the opposite sense. Researchers from the University of Basel were now able to show that aspirin use and smoking both influence aging processes of the female genome that are connected to colorectal cancer.

Sorting Out Emotions

July 1, 2014 10:54 am | News | Comments

Building on previous studies targeting the amygdala, a team of researchers have found that some brain cells recognize emotions based on the viewer's preconceptions rather than the true emotion being expressed.           

Watching Individual Neurons Respond to Magnetic Therapy

July 1, 2014 10:40 am | News | Comments

Engineers and neuroscientists have developed a method to measure the response of an individual neuron to transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) of the brain. The advance will help researchers understand the underlying physiological effects of TMS.

Research Gives 3-D View of Important Brain Receptor

June 30, 2014 12:02 pm | Videos | Comments

Researchers with Oregon Health & Science University's Vollum Institute have given science a new and unprecedented 3-D view of one of the most important receptors in the brain—a receptor that allows us to learn and remember, and whose dysfunction is involved in a wide range of neurological diseases and conditions, including Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, schizophrenia and depression.

Bacteria Can Evolve a Biological Timer to Survive Antibiotic Treatments

June 30, 2014 11:52 am | News | Comments

The ability of microorganisms to overcome antibiotic treatments is one of the top concerns of modern medicine. The effectiveness of many antibiotics has been reduced by bacteria's ability to rapidly evolve and develop strategies to resist antibiotics. Bacteria achieve this by specific mechanisms that are tailored to the molecular structure or function of a particular antibiotic.

Early Life Stress Can Leave Lasting Impacts on the Brain

June 30, 2014 11:38 am | News | Comments

For children, stress can go a long way. A little bit provides a platform for learning, adapting and coping. But a lot of it—chronic, toxic stress like poverty, neglect and physical abuse—can have lasting negative impacts. Researchers recently showed these kinds of stressors, experienced in early life, might be changing the parts of developing children's brains responsible for learning, memory and the processing of stress and emotion.

Potential Alzheimer’s Drug Prevents Abnormal Blood Clots in Brain

June 30, 2014 11:30 am | News | Comments

New experiments have identified a compound that might halt the progression of Alzheimer’s by interfering with the role amyloid-beta plays in the formation of blood clots.                       

Missing Protein Explains Obesity, Diabetes Link

June 30, 2014 11:18 am | News | Comments

Scientists have discovered that obese individuals lack a protein that is essential for regulating blood glucose levels, causing them to face higher risks of developing diabetes.                     

Noninvasive Brain Control

June 30, 2014 10:53 am | News | Comments

Optogenetics requires a light source to be implanted in the brain, where it can reach the cells that need to be controlled. Now, engineers have developed the first light-sensitive molecule that enables neurons to be silenced noninvasively, using a light source outside the skull.

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