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New Visualization Software Uncovers Cancer Subtypes

October 3, 2014 1:42 pm | News | Comments

Much of biomedical research these days is about big data—collecting and analyzing vast, detailed repositories of information about health and disease. These data sets can be treasure troves for investigators, often uncovering genetic mutations that drive a particular kind of cancer, for example.

Applying Proteomics to Parkinson’s

October 3, 2014 12:15 pm | News | Comments

Scientists studying two genes that are mutated in an early-onset form of Parkinson’s disease have deciphered how normal versions of these genes collaborate to help rid cells of damaged mitochondria.               

Discovery Could Prevent Development of Brain Tumors in Children

October 2, 2014 3:10 pm | News | Comments

Scientists discovered a mechanism that promotes the progression of medulloblastoma, the most common brain tumor found in children. The team found that a protein known as Sonic Hedgehog induces DNA damage, which causes the cancer to develop.   

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MicroRNA Tied to Colon Cancer Tumor Growth

October 2, 2014 2:57 pm | News | Comments

Researchers have identified microRNAs that may cause colon polyps from turning cancerous. The finding could help physicians provide more specialized, and earlier, treatment before colon cancer develops.               

Predicting Abstract Judgments from Brain Waves

October 2, 2014 2:44 pm | News | Comments

People make immediate judgments about images they are shown, which could impact on their decisions, even before their brains have had time to consciously process the information, a study of brainwaves has found.            

Schizophrenia, Bipolar Disorder Linked to Dendritic Spine Loss in Brain

October 2, 2014 2:32 pm | News | Comments

Schizophrenia and bipolar disorder both appear to be associated with dendritic spine loss in the brain, according to a new study, which suggests that the two distinct disorders may share common pathophysiological features.        

Making Old Lungs Look New Again

October 2, 2014 2:21 pm | News | Comments

New research shows that the lungs become more inflammatory with age and that ibuprofen can lower that inflammation. In fact, immune cells from old mouse lungs fought tuberculosis bacteria as effectively as cells from young mice after lung inflammation was reduced by ibuprofen.

Liberia to Prosecute Man Who Brought Ebola to U.S.

October 2, 2014 1:35 pm | by David Warren - Associated Press - Associated Press | News | Comments

Liberia plans to prosecute the airline passenger who brought Ebola into the U.S., alleging that he lied on an airport questionnaire about not having any contact with an infected person, authorities said Thursday.           

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Research Explores New Possibilities for Epilepsy Treatment

October 1, 2014 3:34 pm | News | Comments

Ongoing research is investigating the connection between initial seizures and the onset of epilepsy later in life. Nearly one in 10 Americans will experience an initial seizure, but only 3 percent of those who experience a seizure will go on to develop epilepsy.

Gene Interacts With Stress, Leads to Heart Disease

October 1, 2014 3:33 pm | News | Comments

A new genetic finding suggests that some people who are prone to hostility, anxiety and depression might also be hard-wired to gain weight when exposed to chronic stress, leading to diabetes and heart disease.           

Omega-3 Fatty Acids May Prevent Some Forms of Depression

October 1, 2014 3:29 pm | News | Comments

Omega-3 fatty acids, more commonly known as fish oil, have a long list of health benefits, including lowering the risk of heart disease and reducing triglyceride levels. These nutritional compounds are also known to have anti-depressant and anti-inflammatory properties.

Memory Loss Associated with Alzheimer's Reversed for First Time

October 1, 2014 3:24 pm | News | Comments

In the first small study of a novel, personalized and comprehensive program to reverse memory loss, nine of 10 participants displayed subjective or objective improvement in their memories.                   

Lift Weights, Improve Your Memory

October 1, 2014 1:29 pm | Videos | Comments

Here’s another reason why it’s a good idea to hit the gym: it can improve memory. A new study shows that an intense workout of as little as 20 minutes can enhance episodic memory, also known as long-term memory for previous events, by about 10 percent in healthy young adults.

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Child Dies from Enterovirus 68 Complications

October 1, 2014 12:37 pm | by The Associated Press | News | Comments

The Rhode Island Health Department says a child has died from complications of an unusual respiratory virus that has been affecting children across the U.S.                           

10 Questions, Answers About the U.S. Ebola Case

October 1, 2014 3:36 am | by Lauran Neergaard - AP Medical Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

U.S. health officials have warned for months that someone infected with Ebola could unknowingly carry the virus to this country, and there is word now that it has happened: A traveler in a Dallas hospital became the first patient diagnosed in the U.S.

Early Antibiotic Use Linked to Childhood Obesity Risk

September 30, 2014 2:22 pm | News | Comments

The use of broad-spectrum antibiotics by children before the age of 24 months was associated with increased risk of obesity in early childhood, according to a new study.                       

Scientists Discover Gene Controlling Muscle Fate

September 30, 2014 2:11 pm | News | Comments

Scientists have moved a step closer to improving medical science through research involving muscle manipulation of fruit flies. They discovered in the flight muscles of Drosophila a new regulator of a process called alternative splicing.     

Modeling Shockwaves Through the Brain

September 30, 2014 2:00 pm | News | Comments

Researchers have developed a scaling law that predicts a human’s risk of brain injury, based on previous studies of blasts’ effects on animal brains. The method may help the military develop more protective helmets, as well as aid clinicians in diagnosing traumatic brain injury.

NIH Awards Initial $46M for BRAIN Initiative Research

September 30, 2014 1:51 pm | News | Comments

The National Institutes of Health announced today its first wave of investments totaling $46 million in fiscal year 14 funds to support the goals of the Brain Research through Advancing Innovative Neurotechnologies (BRAIN) Initiative.     

Breaking News: Six Changing Faces of ‘Global Killer’ Bacteria

September 30, 2014 11:22 am | News | Comments

Researchers have shown for the first time that a genetic switch allows Streptococcus pneumoniae to randomly change its characteristics into six alternative states.                          

BST This Week #20: Dengue-blocking Mosquito Released in Brazil

September 30, 2014 10:26 am | Videos | Comments

On this episode of Bioscience Technology This Week, Christina Jakubowski covers mosquitoes infected with a dengue-blocking bacteria that have been released in Brazil. Our second story highlights new research that has restored natural walking ability in completely paralyzed rats.

Study Examines Cancer Risk from First Atom-bomb Test

September 30, 2014 8:30 am | by Susan Montoya Bryan - Associated Press - Associated Press | News | Comments

Researchers from the National Cancer Institute want to know how many past and present cancer cases in New Mexico may be related to the U.S. government's test of the world's first atomic bomb over a remote stretch of desert nearly 70 years ago.  

U.S. Ebola Labs, Parts for Clinic Arrive in Liberia

September 30, 2014 5:37 am | by Jonathan Paye-Layleh - Associated Press - Associated Press | News | Comments

U.S. mobile Ebola labs should be up and running in Liberia this week, and American troops have broken ground for a field hospital, as the international community races to increase the ability to care for the spiraling number of people infected with the dreaded disease.

Scientists Identify Signature of Aging in the Brain

September 29, 2014 1:14 pm | News | Comments

How the brain ages is still largely an open question– in part because this organ is mostly insulated from direct contact with other systems in the body, including the blood and immune systems. Now, new research may have found evidence of a unique “signature” that may be the “missing link” between cognitive decline and aging.

Protein that Causes Frontotemporal Dementia also Implicated in Alzheimer’s

September 29, 2014 12:56 pm | News | Comments

Researchers have shown that low levels of the protein progranulin in the brain can increase the formation of amyloid-beta plaques (a hallmark of Alzheimer’s disease), cause neuroinflammation, and worsen memory deficits in a mouse model of this condition.

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