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Married People Less Likely to Have Cardiovascular Problems

March 28, 2014 2:08 pm | News | Comments

Analysis of surveys of more than 3.5 million American men and women, administered at some 20,000 health centers across the country—believed to be the largest analysis of its kind ever performed—found that married people, regardless of age, sex, or even cardiovascular risk factors, had significantly less chances of having any kind of cardiovascular disease than those who were single, divorced or widowed.

Cancer Researchers Find Key Protein Link

March 28, 2014 1:48 pm | News | Comments

A new understanding of proteins at the nexus of a cell’s decision to survive or die has implications for researchers who study cancer and age-related diseases, according to biophysicists at the Rice University-based Center for Theoretical Biological Physics (CTBP). Experiments and computer analysis of two key proteins revealed a previously unknown binding interface that could be addressed by medication.

Neurobiologists Find Chronic Stress in Early Life Causes Anxiety, Aggression in Adulthood

March 28, 2014 1:35 pm | News | Comments

In recent years, behavioral neuroscientists have debated the meaning and significance of a plethora of independently conducted experiments seeking to establish the impact of chronic, early-life stress upon behavior—both at the time that stress is experienced, and upon the same individuals later in life, during adulthood.

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Study Finds Many Preteens Have High Cholesterol

March 28, 2014 9:20 am | by Marilynn Marchione - AP Chief Medical Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

There's fresh evidence that a lot of young people could be headed for heart trouble. A large study of preteens in Texas found that about one-third of them had borderline or high cholesterol when tested during routine physical exams. The results seem to support recent guidelines that call for every child to have a cholesterol test between 9 and 11.

US Autism Estimate Rises to 1 in 68 Children

March 27, 2014 5:20 pm | by Mike Stobbe - AP Medical Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

The government's estimate of autism has moved up again to 1 in 68 U.S. children, a 30 percent increase in two years. But health officials say the new number may not mean autism is more common. Much of the increase is believed to be from a cultural and medical shift, with doctors diagnosing autism more frequently.

Researcher Invents ‘Mini Heart’ to Help Return Venous Blood

March 27, 2014 2:16 pm | Videos | Comments

George Washington University researcher Narine Sarvazyan, PhD, has invented a new organ to help return blood flow from veins lacking functional valves. A rhythmically contracting cuff made of cardiac muscle cells surrounds the vein acting as a 'mini heart' to aid blood flow through venous segments. The cuff can be made of a patient’s own adult stem cells, eliminating the chance of implant rejection.

Natural Plant Compounds May Assist Chemotherapy

March 27, 2014 2:06 pm | News | Comments

Scientists at Plant & Food Research, working together with researchers at The University of Auckland and the National Cancer Institute of The Netherlands, have discovered specific plant compounds able to inhibit transport mechanisms in the body that select what compounds are absorbed into the body,and eventually into cells. These same transport mechanisms are known to interfere with cancer chemotherapy treatment.

Brain Degeneration in Huntington’s Caused by Amino Acid Deficiency

March 27, 2014 12:58 pm | News | Comments

Neuroscientists report they have identified what they believe is the cause of the vast disintegration of a part of the brain called the corpus striatum in rodents and people with Huntington’s disease: loss of the ability to make the amino acid cysteine.

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3-D MRI Scans Can Predict Survival After Targeted Chemo for Liver Tumors

March 27, 2014 12:48 pm | News | Comments

In a series of studies researchers have used specialized 3-D MRI scans to precisely measure living and dying tumor tissue to quickly show whether highly toxic chemotherapy is working.                   

Genetics Explain Why Infections Trigger Rheumatoid Arthritis

March 27, 2014 12:40 pm | News | Comments

A team of researchers believe their findings could have important implications for the way that rheumatoid arthritis is diagnosed and treated. They say that more accurate clinical testing is now needed to better identify rheumatoid arthritis and to prevent it being misdiagnosed.

Heart Responds Differently to Exercise in Men, Women

March 27, 2014 12:20 pm | News | Comments

The formula for peak exercise heart rate that doctors have used for decades in tests to diagnose heart conditions may be flawed because it does not account for differences between men and women, new research says.            

Cholesterol Levels Vary by Season, Worsen in Colder Months

March 27, 2014 12:15 pm | News | Comments

Cholesterol levels fluctuate based on the time of year with more unfavorable lipid profiles seen in the colder months, a trend that may be driven by related behavior changes, according to new research.               

Autism Linked to Flawed Prenatal Brain Growth

March 27, 2014 11:46 am | by Lindsey Tanner - AP Medical Writer | Videos | Comments

A small study that examined brains from children who died found abnormal patterns of cell growth in autistic children. The research bolsters evidence that something before birth might cause autism, at least in some cases.         

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Researchers Present Comprehensive “Roadmap” of Blood Cells

March 26, 2014 2:30 pm | News | Comments

Research published online in Blood presents an unprecedented look at five unique blood cells in the human body, pinpointing the location of key genetic regulators in these cells and providing a new tool that may help scientists to identify how blood cells form and shed light on the etiology of blood diseases.

Cancer Biologists Link Tumor Suppressor Gene to Stem Cells

March 26, 2014 2:09 pm | News | Comments

Just as archeologists try to decipher ancient tablets to discern their meaning, UT Southwestern Medical Center cancer biologists are working to decode the purpose of an ancient gene considered one of the most important in cancer research. The p53 gene appears to be involved in signaling other cells instrumental in stopping tumor development. But the p53 gene predates cancer, so scientists are uncertain what its original function is.

New Clue to Autism Found Inside Brain Cells

March 26, 2014 1:35 pm | News | Comments

The problems people with autism have with memory formation, higher-level thinking and social interactions may be partially attributable to the activity of receptors inside brain cells, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have learned.

Model Predicts Blood Glucose Levels 30 Minutes Later

March 26, 2014 12:26 pm | News | Comments

A mathematical model created by Penn State researchers can predict with more than 90 percent accuracy the blood glucose levels of individuals with type 1 diabetes up to 30 minutes in advance of imminent changes in their levels—plenty of time to take preventative action.

Peaches Inhibit Breast Cancer Metastasis in Mice

March 26, 2014 9:54 am | News | Comments

Lab tests at Texas A&M AgriLife Research have shown that treatments with peach extract inhibit breast cancer metastasis in mice. AgriLife Research scientists say that the mixture of phenolic compounds present in the peach extract are responsible for the inhibition of metastasis, according to the study.

For Neurons in the Brain, Identity Can Be Used to Predict Location

March 25, 2014 1:40 pm | News | Comments

A team of scientists at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory (CSHL) led by Professor Partha Mitra describes a new mathematical model that combines large data sets to predict where different types of cells are located within the brain, based on their molecular identity.

Catheter Innovation Destroys Dangerous Biofilms

March 25, 2014 1:26 pm | Videos | Comments

For the millions of people forced to rely on a plastic tube to eliminate their urine, developing an infection is nearly a 100 percent guarantee after just four weeks. But with the help of a little bubble-blowing, biomedical engineers hope to bring relief to urethras everywhere.

Microfluidic Device with Artificial Arteries Measures Drugs’ Influence on Blood Clotting

March 25, 2014 1:15 pm | News | Comments

A new microfluidic method for evaluating drugs commonly used for preventing heart attacks has found that while aspirin can prevent dangerous blood clots in some at-risk patients, it may not be effective in all patients with narrowed arteries. The study, which involved 14 human subjects, used a device that simulated blood flowing through narrowed coronary arteries to assess effects of anti-clotting drugs.

Research Reveals New Depths of Complexity in Nerve Cells

March 25, 2014 12:56 pm | News | Comments

Research from the Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation reveals a new complexity to nerve cells in the brain that could affect future therapies aimed at altering mood and memory in humans. OMRF scientist Kenneth Miller, Ph.D., studied the function of a common protein (known as CaM Kinase II) in tiny roundworms called C. elegans.

MRI Reveals Genetic Activity

March 25, 2014 12:06 pm | News | Comments

Doctors commonly use magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to diagnose tumors, damage from stroke, and many other medical conditions. Neuroscientists also rely on it as a research tool for identifying parts of the brain that carry out different cognitive functions. Now, a team of biological engineers at MIT is trying to adapt MRI to a much smaller scale, allowing researchers to visualize gene activity inside the brains of living animals.

Light-activated Antimicrobial Surface Also Works in the Dark

March 25, 2014 11:51 am | News | Comments

Researchers at University College London developed a new antibacterial material which has potential for cutting hospital acquired infections. The combination of two simple dyes with nanoscopic particles of gold is deadly to bacteria when activated by light - even under modest indoor lighting. And in a first for this type of substance, it also shows impressive antibacterial properties in total darkness.

Breaking News: Bipolar Neurons Made from Skin Cells

March 25, 2014 11:46 am | News | Comments

What makes a person bipolar, prone to manic highs and deep, depressed lows? Why does bipolar disorder run so strongly in families? And why is it so hard to find new treatments? New stem cell research may help scientists find answers to these questions.

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