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Bacteria Hijack Plentiful Iron Supply Source to Flourish

July 9, 2014 4:21 pm | News | Comments

In an era of increasing concern about the prevalence of antibiotic-resistant illness, researchers have identified a promising new pathway to disabling disease: blocking bacteria’s access to iron in the body.             

Study Cracks How the Brain Processes Emotions

July 9, 2014 4:05 pm | News | Comments

Although feelings are personal and subjective, the human brain turns them into a standard code that objectively represents emotions across different senses, situations and even people, reports a new study by Cornell University neuroscientist Adam Anderson.

New Mutations Found in Most Common Form of Lung Cancer

July 9, 2014 3:54 pm | News | Comments

Researchers have identified novel mutations in a well-known cancer-causing pathway in lung adenocarcinoma, the most common subtype of lung cancer. Knowledge of these genomic changes may expand the number of possible therapeutic targets for this disease and potentially identify a greater number of patients with treatable mutations because many potent cancer drugs that target these mutations already exist.

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Not at Home on the Range

July 9, 2014 3:44 pm | News | Comments

As climate change shifts the geographic ranges in which animals can be found, concern mounts over the effect it has on their parasites. Does an increased range for a host mean new territory for its parasites as well? Not necessarily, says a team of UC Santa Barbara scientists.  

When Faced With Some Sugars, Bacteria Can Be Picky Eaters

July 9, 2014 12:18 pm | News | Comments

Researchers from North Carolina State University and the University of Minnesota have found for the first time that genetically identical strains of bacteria can respond very differently to the presence of sugars and other organic molecules in the environment, with some individual bacteria devouring the sugars and others ignoring it.

Huntington’s Disease Protein Helps Wire the Young Brain

July 9, 2014 12:07 pm | News | Comments

The protein that is mutated in Huntington’s disease is critical for wiring the brain in early life, according to a new Duke University study. The new findings add to growing evidence that Huntington’s and other neurodegenerative disorders, such as Alzheimer’s disease, may take root during development.

Tiny DNA Pyramids Enter Bacteria Easily and Deliver a Deadly Payload

July 9, 2014 11:53 am | News | Comments

Bacterial infections usually announce themselves with pain and fever but often can be defeated with antibiotics—and then there are those that are sneaky and hard to beat. Now, scientists have built a new weapon against such pathogens in the form of tiny DNA pyramids. Their study found the nanopyramids can flag bacteria and kill more of them than medicine alone.

Bioscience Technology This Week #1: Tick Bites Pack Double Punch

July 9, 2014 11:24 am | Videos | Comments

On this episode of Bioscience Technology This Week, Editor-in-Chief Rob Fee reports on the possible double-punch of tick bites and how to control and undo years of heart damage.                   

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Obesity Can Cut Up to 14 Years from Life Expectancy

July 9, 2014 11:09 am | News | Comments

Adults with extreme obesity have increased risks of dying at a young age from cancer and many other causes including heart disease, stroke, diabetes, and kidney and liver diseases, according to results of a new analysis.         

Cinnamon Could Halt Progression of Parkinson’s

July 9, 2014 10:26 am | News | Comments

Neurological scientists have found that using cinnamon, a common food spice and flavoring material, can reverse the biomechanical, cellular and anatomical changes that occur in the brains of mice with Parkinson’s disease (PD).       

Forgotten Vials of Smallpox Found in Storage Room

July 9, 2014 8:30 am | by Mike Stobbe, AP Medical Writer | News | Comments

A government scientist cleaning out an old storage room at a research center near Washington made a startling discovery last week- decades-old vials of smallpox packed away and forgotten in a cardboard box.             

AIDS Research Team Loses $1.38M Grant

July 9, 2014 8:30 am | by David Pitt | News | Comments

An AIDS research team at Iowa State University will not get the final $1.38 million payment of a National Institutes of Health five-year grant after a team member admitted last year to faking research results.            

Dodging Dots Helps Explain Brain Circuitry

July 8, 2014 2:02 pm | Videos | Comments

A neuroscience study provides new insight into the primal brain circuits involved in collision avoidance, and perhaps a more general model of how neurons can participate in networks to process information and act on it. In the study, neuroscientists tracked the cell-by-cell progress of neural signals from the eyes through the brains of tadpoles as they saw and reacted to stimuli including an apparently approaching black circle.

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Mechanism Preventing Lethal Bacteria from Causing Invasive Disease Revealed

July 8, 2014 1:31 pm | News | Comments

An important development in understanding how the bacterium that causes pneumonia, meningitis and septicaemia remains harmlessly in the nose and throat has been discovered at the University of Liverpool’s Institute of Infection and Global Health.

Protein Discovery is Step Toward Blood Test for Alzheimer's

July 8, 2014 12:27 pm | News | Comments

Scientists have identified a set of 10 proteins in the blood which can predict the onset of Alzheimer’s, marking a significant step towards developing a blood test for the disease.                     

Low Doses of Arsenic Cause Cancer in Mice

July 8, 2014 11:50 am | News | Comments

Mice exposed to low doses of arsenic in drinking water, similar to what some people might consume, developed lung cancer, researchers have found. Arsenic is present in the environment as a naturally occurring substance or due to contamination from human activity.

Recalled Chobani Contained Highly Pathogenic Mold

July 8, 2014 11:00 am | News | Comments

Samples isolated from Chobani yogurt that was voluntarily recalled in September 2013 have been found to contain the most virulent form of a fungus called Mucor circinelloides, which is associated with infections in immune-compromised people.   

Breaking News: Same Genes Drive Math, Reading Ability

July 8, 2014 11:00 am | News | Comments

Around half of the genes that influence how well a child can read also play a role in their mathematics ability, according to scientists who led a study into the genetic basis of cognitive traits.              

New Discovery in Living Cell Signaling

July 7, 2014 3:05 pm | News | Comments

A breakthrough discovery into how living cells process and respond to chemical information could help advance the development of treatments for a large number of cancers and other cellular disorders that have been resistant to therapy. An international collaboration of researchers unlocked the secret behind the activation of the Ras family of proteins.

Blocking Cells’ Movement to Stop the Spread of Cancer

July 7, 2014 2:53 pm | News | Comments

Insights into how cells move through the body could lead to innovative techniques to stop cancer cells from spreading and causing secondary tumors, according to new UCL research. Scientists discovered that cells can change into an invasive, liquid-like state to readily navigate the narrow channels in our body.

First Cancer Immunotherapy for Dogs Developed

July 7, 2014 2:51 pm | News | Comments

A few therapies derived from human medicine are available for dogs, but a very successful form of therapy by which antibodies inhibit tumor growth has not yet been available for animals. Now, scientists have developed, for the first time, antibodies to treat cancer in dogs.

Schizophrenia-associated Gene Variation Affects Brain Cell Development

July 7, 2014 2:46 pm | News | Comments

Researchers have begun to connect the dots between a schizophrenia-linked genetic variation and its effect on the developing brain. Their experiments show that the loss of a particular gene alters the skeletons of developing brain cells, which in turn disrupts the orderly layers those cells would normally form.

High Cholesterol Linked to Breast Cancer Risk

July 7, 2014 11:57 am | News | Comments

An association between high blood cholesterol and breast cancer has been found in a study of more than 1 million patients over a 14-year time period in the UK.                          

Pseudogenes May Provide Clearer Understanding of Biomarkers

July 7, 2014 11:36 am | News | Comments

Researchers completed a study that generated pseudogene expression profiles in 2,808 patient samples representing seven cancer types. The results indicated that the science of pseudogene expression analysis may very well play a key role in explaining how cancer occurs.

Scientists Find Key Piece in Brain Tumor Puzzle

July 7, 2014 11:22 am | News | Comments

Scientists have shown that a member of the protein family known as SUMO (small ubiquitin-like modifier) is a key to why tumor cells multiply uncontrollably, especially in the case of glioblastoma.                

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