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RNA Molecules in Urine and Tissue Can Detect Prostate Cancer

October 9, 2014 1:40 pm | News | Comments

Researchers have identified a set of RNA molecules that are detectable in tissue samples and urine of prostate cancer patients, but not in normal healthy individuals.                         

Why Do People Risk Infection from Bat Meat?

October 9, 2014 1:25 pm | News | Comments

Ebola, as with many emerging infections, is likely to have arisen due to man’s interaction with wild animals and eating wild meat known as bushmeat. A new survey of people across southern Ghana aims to find out what drives consumption of bat bushmeat, and how people perceive the risks associated with the practice.

Restoring Familiar Sensations to Amputees

October 9, 2014 1:05 pm | Videos | Comments

Even before he lost his right hand to an industrial accident four years ago, Igor Spetic had family open his medicine bottles. Cotton balls give him goose bumps. Now, blindfolded during an experiment, he feels his arm hairs raise when a researcher brushes the back of his prosthetic hand with a cotton ball.

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Autism as a Disorder of Prediction

October 9, 2014 12:10 pm | News | Comments

Autism is characterized by many different symptoms: difficulty interacting with others, repetitive behaviors, and hypersensitivity to sound and other stimuli. Neuroscientists have put forth a new hypothesis that accounts for these behaviors and may provide a neurological foundation for many of the disparate features of the disorder.

Gene Therapy for ‘Bubble Boy’ Disease Appears Effective, Safe

October 9, 2014 11:49 am | News | Comments

A new form of gene therapy for boys with X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency syndrome (SCID-X1), a life-threatening condition also known as “bubble boy” disease, appears to be both effective and safe, according to new research.     

Marburg, Ebola’s Relative, Cured in Monkeys

October 9, 2014 8:30 am | by Cynthia Fox, Science Writer | Articles | Comments

An experimental drug saved the lives of 16 of 16 monkeys with the Marburg virus, a killer near-indistinguishable from Ebola, which caused the death of a Ugandan health worker Oct. 6.                  

Ebola Patient's Death Renews Questions About Care

October 8, 2014 5:36 pm | by Nomaan Merchant - Associated Press - Associated Press | News | Comments

The death of the first Ebola patient diagnosed in the United States renewed questions about his medical care and whether Thomas Eric Duncan's life could have been extended or saved if the Texas hospital where he first sought help had taken him in sooner.

Marburg Fever Death Confirmed in Uganda

October 8, 2014 12:57 pm | by Rodney Muhumuza - Associated Press - Associated Press | News | Comments

A Ugandan health worker recently died of Marburg, a highly infectious disease that manifests as a viral hemorrhagic fever, Uganda's Ministry of Health confirmed Monday as health workers moved to quarantine a total of 80 people who had been in contact with the victim.

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First U.S. Ebola Patient Dies

October 8, 2014 12:47 pm | by Nomaan Merchant - Associated Press - Associated Press | News | Comments

The first Ebola patient diagnosed in the United States died in a Dallas hospital Wednesday, a little more than a week after his diagnosis exposed gaps in the nation's defenses against the disease and set off a scramble to track down anyone exposed to him.

Sugar Linked to Memory Problems in Rats

October 8, 2014 12:35 pm | News | Comments

Studying rats as model subjects, scientists found that adolescents were at an increased risk of suffering negative health effects from sugar-sweetened beverage consumption.                       

Toddlers Regulate Behavior to Avoid Making Adults Angry

October 8, 2014 11:56 am | Videos | Comments

When kids say “the darnedest things,” it’s often in response to something they heard or saw. Now researchers found that children as young as 15 months can detect anger when watching other people’s social interactions and then use that emotional information to guide their own behavior.

MRI Detects Cognitive Decline Before Symptoms Appear

October 8, 2014 11:40 am | News | Comments

A magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technique can detect signs of cognitive decline in the brain even before symptoms appear, according to a new study. The technique has the potential to serve as a biomarker in very early diagnosis of preclinical dementia.

Cost of Ebola Could Top $32B

October 8, 2014 7:36 am | by Deb Riechmann - Associated Press - Associated Press | News | Comments

The economic impact of the Ebola epidemic could reach $32.6 billion by the end of next year if the disease ravaging Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone spreads to neighboring countries in West Africa, the World Bank Group said Wednesday.     

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Gene Mutation Could Prevent Weight Gain from High-sugar Diet

October 7, 2014 1:38 pm | News | Comments

Imagine being able to take a pill that lets you eat all of the ice cream, cookies, and cakes that you wanted– without gaining any weight. New research found a new way to suppress the obesity that accompanies a high-sugar diet, pinning it down to a key gene that pharmaceutical companies have already developed drugs to target.

Green Tea-based ‘Missiles’ May Kill Cancer Cells

October 7, 2014 1:17 pm | News | Comments

Green tea has long been known for its anti-oxidant, anti-cancer, anti-aging and anti-microbial properties. Now, a group of researchers has taken the health benefits of green tea to the next level by using one of its ingredients to develop a drug delivery system.

Ebola in Spain Raises Questions About Protection

October 7, 2014 10:36 am | by Ciaran Giles - Associated Press - Associated Press | News | Comments

Three more people were put under quarantine for possible Ebola at a Madrid hospital where a Spanish nurse became infected, authorities said Tuesday. More than 50 others were being monitored as experts tried to figure out why Spain's anti-infection practices failed.

Six Die in Southern China Dengue Outbreak

October 7, 2014 1:35 am | by The Associated Press | News | Comments

The dengue virus has killed six people and infected more than 21,000 in southern China's worst outbreak of the mosquito-transmitted disease in about two decades, officials said Tuesday.                   

First Pictures of BRCA2 Protein Show How it Repairs DNA

October 6, 2014 12:00 pm | News | Comments

Scientists have taken pictures of the BRCA2 protein for the first time, showing how it works to repair damaged DNA. Mutations in the gene that encodes BRCA2 are well known for raising the risk of breast cancer and other cancers.      

Identical Twin Study Reveals Diabetes Clues

October 6, 2014 11:33 am | News | Comments

By studying identical twins, researchers have identified mechanisms that could be behind the development of type 2 diabetes. This may explain cases where one identical twin develops type 2 diabetes while the other remains healthy.      

Journalist with Ebola Arrives at Nebraska Hospital

October 6, 2014 8:35 am | by Josh Funk - Associated Press - Associated Press | News | Comments

A plane carrying an American photojournalist who contracted Ebola while working in Liberia landed Monday in Nebraska, where he will undergo treatment for the deadly disease. The specially equipped plane Ashoka Mukpo landed at Eppley Airfield in Omaha at around 7:30 a.m. Monday.

Medicine Nobel Goes to Discovery of Brain's GPS

October 6, 2014 7:36 am | by Karl Ritter and Jill Lawless - Associated Press - Associated Press | News | Comments

A U.S.-British scientist and a Norwegian husband-and-wife research team won the Nobel Prize in medicine Monday for discovering the brain's navigation system - the inner GPS that helps us find our way in the world - a revelation that could lead to advances in diagnosing Alzheimer's.

‘Mini-stroke’ May Lead to PTSD

October 3, 2014 2:46 pm | News | Comments

A “mini-stroke” may increase your risk of developing post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), according to new research. The study found that one in three transient ischemic attack (TIA) patients develop PTSD.         

New Discovery in the Microbiology of Serious Human Disease

October 3, 2014 2:41 pm | News | Comments

Previously undiscovered secrets of how human cells interact with a bacterium which causes a serious human disease have been revealed in new research by microbiologists.                        

Curiosity Helps Learning, Memory

October 3, 2014 2:32 pm | News | Comments

Curiosity helps us learn about a topic, and being in a curious state also helps the brain memorize unrelated information, according to new research. The study provides insight into how piquing our curiosity changes our brains.        

Viral Infection May Trigger Childhood Diabetes in Utero

October 3, 2014 2:26 pm | News | Comments

The exact cause of juvenile type 1 diabetes has eluded scientists, but a new study suggests a likely trigger before birth. A recent paper puts forth evidence that the autoimmune disease is initiated in utero.           

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