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DNA Modifications Predict Brain’s Threat Response

August 4, 2014 1:01 pm | News | Comments

The tiny addition of a chemical mark atop a gene that is well known for its involvement in clinical depression and posttraumatic stress disorder can affect the way a person’s brain responds to threats, according to a new study.       

New Genetic Risk Markers Found in Pancreatic Cancer

August 4, 2014 12:46 pm | News | Comments

A large DNA analysis of people with and without pancreatic cancer has identified several new genetic markers that signal increased risk of developing the highly lethal disease, scientists report.               

Chili Pepper Chemical May Inhibit Gut Tumors

August 4, 2014 12:35 pm | News | Comments

Researchers report that dietary capsaicin– the active ingredient in chili peppers– produces chronic activation of a receptor on cells lining the intestines of mice, triggering a reaction that ultimately reduces the risk of colorectal tumors.   

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Small RNAs in Blood May Reveal Heart Injury

August 4, 2014 12:07 pm | News | Comments

New research suggests that microRNAs may be able to relay valuable information about damage to the heart: Scientists have linked an increase in certain microRNAs circulating in the blood with injury to cardiac muscle.          

African Plant May Be Possible Treatment for Aging Brain

August 4, 2014 11:22 am | News | Comments

Scientists have discovered that a compound isolated from the plant protects cells from altered molecular pathways linked to Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s and the neurodegeneration that often follows a stroke.              

Toledo Mayor Lifts Water Ban

August 4, 2014 10:22 am | by John Seewer - Associated Press - Associated Press | News | Comments

A water ban that had hundreds of thousands of people in Ohio and Michigan scrambling for drinking water has been lifted, Toledo's mayor announced Monday.                           

Ebola Vaccine Not Far Away

August 4, 2014 9:22 am | by The Associated Press | News | Comments

The nation's top infectious disease official says there's hope that a vaccine against Ebola will be available as early as next July. Dr. Anthony Fauci of the National Institutes of Health says such a preventive vaccine has been successfully tested with monkeys.

Engineering a Protein to Prevent Brain Damage from Toxic Agents

July 31, 2014 3:21 pm | News | Comments

Research at New York University is paving the way for a breakthrough that may prevent brain damage in civilians and military troops exposed to poisonous chemicals—particularly those in pesticides and chemical weapons. The research outlines the advancement in detoxifying organophosphates, which are compounds commonly used in pesticides and warfare agents.

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New Way to Generate Insulin-producing Cells in Diabetes

July 31, 2014 3:20 pm | Videos | Comments

A new study has found that a peptide called caerulein can convert existing cells in the pancreas into those cells destroyed in type 1 diabetes-insulin-producing beta cells.                       

Molecule Enhances Copper’s Lethal Punch Against Microbes

July 31, 2014 3:11 pm | News | Comments

Harnessing a natural process in the body that pumps lethal doses of copper to fungi and bacteria shows promise as a new way to kill infectious microbes, a team of scientists report.                   

Strict Genomic Partitioning by Biological Clock Separates Key Metabolic Functions

July 31, 2014 3:10 pm | News | Comments

Much of the liver’s metabolic function is governed by circadian rhythms—our own body clock—and UC Irvine researchers have now found two independent mechanisms by which this occurs. The study reveals new information about the body clock’s sway over metabolism and points the way to more focused drug treatments for liver disease and such metabolic disorders as obesity and diabetes.

How Is Depression Related to Dementia?

July 31, 2014 3:05 pm | News | Comments

A new study gives insight into the relationship between depression and dementia. The current study, which involved 1,764 people from the Religious Orders Study and the Rush Memory and Aging Project, indicates that the association of depression with dementia is independent of dementia-related brain changes.

Pesticide DDT Linked to Slow Metabolism, Obesity, and Diabetes

July 31, 2014 2:43 pm | News | Comments

Exposure of pregnant mice to the pesticide DDT is linked to an increased risk of obesity, diabetes, high cholesterol, and related conditions in female offspring later in life, according to a study led by the University of California, Davis.

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Scientists Zoom In and Out as Brain Processes Sound

July 31, 2014 12:00 pm | News | Comments

Researchers have mapped the sound-processing part of the mouse brain in a way that keeps both the proverbial forest and the trees in view. Their technique allows zooming in and out on views of brain activity within mice, and it enabled the team to watch brain cells light up as mice “called” to each other.

Drug Target Identified for Common Childhood Blood Cancer

July 31, 2014 12:00 pm | News | Comments

In what is believed to be the largest genetic analysis of what triggers and propels progression of tumor growth in a common childhood blood cancer, researchers report that they have identified a possible new drug target for treating the disease. 

Autistic Brain Less Flexible at Taking on Tasks

July 31, 2014 9:41 am | News | Comments

The brains of children with autism are relatively inflexible at switching from rest to task performance, according to a new study. Instead of changing to accommodate a job, connectivity in key brain networks of autistic children looks similar to connectivity in the resting brain. And the greater this inflexibility, the more severe the child’s manifestations of repetitive and restrictive behaviors that characterize autism, the study found.

Dissolvable Fabric Loaded with Medicine Might Offer Faster Protection Against HIV

July 31, 2014 9:27 am | News | Comments

University of Washington bioengineers have discovered a potentially faster way to deliver a topical drug that protects women from contracting HIV. Their method spins the drug into silk-like fibers that quickly dissolve when in contact with moisture, releasing higher doses of the drug than possible with other topical materials such as gels or creams.

Birth Weight and Breastfeeding Have Implications for Children’s Health Decades Later

July 31, 2014 9:20 am | News | Comments

Young adults who were breastfed for three months or more as babies have a significantly lower risk of chronic inflammation associated with cardiovascular and metabolic diseases, according to research from the Brown School at Washington University in St. Louis.

Kids with Autism, SPD Show Differences in Brain Wiring

July 31, 2014 8:30 am | News | Comments

Researchers have found that children with sensory processing disorders have decreased structural brain connections in specific sensory regions different than those in autism, further establishing SPD as a clinically important neurodevelopmental disorder.

Same Cancer, Different Time Zone

July 31, 2014 8:30 am | News | Comments

Just as no two people possess the same genetic makeup, a recent study has shown that no two single tumor cells in breast cancer patients have an identical genome.                          

Team Makes Cancer Glow to Improve Surgical Outcomes

July 30, 2014 1:49 pm | News | Comments

The best way to cure most cases of cancer is to surgically remove the tumor. The Achilles heel of this approach, however, is that the surgeon may fail to extract the entire tumor, leading to a local recurrence. With a new technique, researchers at the University of Pennsylvania have established a new strategy to help surgeons see the entire tumor in the patient, increasing the likelihood of a positive outcome.

Midlife Problem Drinking Doubles Chance of Memory Issues

July 30, 2014 12:00 pm | News | Comments

A new study indicates that middle-aged adults with a history of problem drinking are more than twice as likely to suffer from severe memory impairment in later life.                         

Deadly Melanoma Cases Jump 200%, Report Says

July 30, 2014 8:22 am | by Anne Flaherty - Associated Press - Associated Press | News | Comments

Stop sunbathing and using indoor tanning beds, the acting U.S. surgeon general warned in a report released Tuesday that cites an alarming 200 percent jump in deadly melanoma cases since 1973.                 

Advance in Capturing Elusive Circulating Tumor Cells

July 29, 2014 3:33 pm | by Cynthia Fox | Articles | Comments

When cancers spread into the bloodstream, they often take on different characteristics, requiring different therapies. But it is hard to find these rare blood-borne cells. So, relapsed patients often do not get personalized care. Now, researchers have come up with a solution that zeros in on elusive circulating tumor cells (CTCs).

New Gene Function Discovery Offers Clues to ALS

July 29, 2014 12:11 pm | News | Comments

Researchers have found a missing link that helps to explain how ALS, one of the world’s most feared diseases, paralyses and ultimately kills its victims. The breakthrough is helping them trace a path to a treatment or even a cure.       

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