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Q&A: Math, Biological Science Predict Flu Outbreaks

December 8, 2014 2:50 pm | News | Comments

Just as weather forecasting has improved over recent decades, the accuracy of forecasting influenza and other infectious diseases is expected to improve, according to research from a team that placed first in the CDC’s “Predict the Influenza Season Challenge.”

NIH Funds Robots to Assist People with Disabilities

December 8, 2014 2:39 pm | News | Comments

New research in robotics might help with stroke rehabilitation, guide wheelchairs, and assist children with Autism Spectrum Disorder. Projects investigating co-robotics are the focus of new funding from the National Institutes of Health.    

For Kids with Autism, a 'Flight' to Ease Stress

December 8, 2014 12:19 pm | by Patrick Semansky - Associated Press - Associated Press | News | Comments

With boarding passes in hand, children with autism spectrum disorders and their families took part in an air travel rehearsal at Baltimore-Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport.                 

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In Ebola Outbreak, Bad Data Adds Another Problem

December 8, 2014 12:04 pm | by Maria Cheng and Sarah Dilorenzo - Associated Press - Associated Press | News | Comments

As health officials struggle to contain the world's biggest-ever Ebola outbreak, their efforts are being complicated by another problem: bad data.                              

Drug Development in a Time of Ebola

December 8, 2014 11:44 am | by Ryan Bushey, Associate Editor | Videos | Comments

Forbes kicked off the 2014 Healthcare Summit with a session titled, “Drug Development in A Time of Ebola,” where Forbes senior editor Matthew Herper interviewed Edward Cox and Lucianna Borio, two high-ranking officials at the FDA.

‘Satiety Hormone’ Leptin Links Obesity to High Blood Pressure

December 5, 2014 1:42 pm | News | Comments

Leptin, a hormone that regulates the amount of fat stored in the body, also drives the increase in blood pressure that occurs with weight gain, according to researchers.                        

Genetic Errors Linked to More ALS Cases than Originally Thought

December 5, 2014 1:24 pm | News | Comments

Genetic mutations may cause more cases of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) than scientists previously had realized, according to new research.                              

Resistance and Futility

December 5, 2014 1:02 pm | News | Comments

Scientists have revealed how penicillin deals bacteria a devastating blow— which may lead to new ways to thwart drug resistance. Looking beyond penicillin’s known targets in the cell wall, the team showed that these drugs do more than simply block cell-wall assembly.

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Smoking Linked to Loss of Y Chromosome in Men

December 5, 2014 12:32 pm | News | Comments

In a new study, researchers demonstrated an association between smoking and loss of the Y chromosome in blood cells. The researchers have previously shown that loss of the Y chromosome is linked to cancer.          

Flu Vaccine May Be Less Effective this Winter

December 5, 2014 12:11 pm | by Mike Stobbe - AP Medical Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

The flu vaccine may not be very effective this winter, according to U.S. health officials who worry this may lead to more serious illnesses and deaths.                             

Canada Hopes Avian Flu is Contained to 4 Farms

December 5, 2014 11:56 am | News | Comments

Canadian officials hope an avian flu outbreak has been contained to four quarantined poultry farms in British Columbia. The turkeys and chickens that haven't died from the disease will be euthanized - a total of about 35,000 birds.    

Predicting Alzheimer’s Disease With Blood Tests: Early Detection, Ethical Concerns

December 4, 2014 8:46 am | by Stephanie Guzowski, Editor, Drug Discovery & Development | Articles | Comments

If you could take a blood test that could detect — with nearly 100% accuracy — whether you were genetically destined to get Alzheimer’s disease, would you take that test? Read more...                     

Disentangling the Dopaminergic System

December 3, 2014 3:55 pm | News | Comments

Though dopamine neurons influence many diverse behaviors and diseases, scientists have historically presumed that all of these important nerve cells are molecularly similar within two clusters of the brain. In a new study, Northwestern Medicine scientists prove that premise wrong by identifying several molecularly distinct subtypes of dopamine neurons within each cluster. Read more...

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Mediterranean Diet Has Marked Impact on Aging

December 3, 2014 3:42 pm | by Brigham and Women’s Hospital | News | Comments

The  Mediterranean diet consistently has been linked with an array of health benefits, including decreased risk of chronic disease and cancer. Until now, however, no studies had associated the diet with longer telomeres, one of the biomarkers of aging. Read more...

Relationship Between Sleep Cycle, Cancer Incidence

December 3, 2014 3:25 pm | News | Comments

People who work around the clock could actually be setting themselves back, according to Virginia Tech biologists. Researchers found that a protein responsible for regulating the body’s sleep cycle, or circadian rhythm, also protects the body from developing sporadic forms of cancers. Read more...

Scientists Detect Brain Network That Gives Humans Superior Reasoning Skills

December 3, 2014 3:18 pm | by Yasmin Anwar, UC Berkeley | News | Comments

UC Berkeley scientists have found mounting brain evidence that helps explain how humans have excelled at “relational reasoning,” a cognitive skill in which we discern patterns and relationships to make sense of seemingly unrelated information, such as solving problems in unfamiliar circumstances. Read more...

Brain Activity after Smokers Quit Predicts Chances of Relapsing

December 3, 2014 2:57 pm | News | Comments

Quitting smoking sets off a series of changes in the brain that Penn Medicine researchers say may better identify smokers who will start smoking again—a prediction that goes above and beyond today’s clinical or behavioral tools for assessing relapse risk. Read more...

Seeking Answers from a Mysterious Parasite

December 3, 2014 11:07 am | News | Comments

Toxoplasma gondii is a common parasite often spread by cats. Most people who are infected in Europe or North America show no symptoms at all, and only a few suffer from encephalitis or ocular toxoplasmosis, which can cause blindness. However, in South America, toxoplasmosis is associated with much more severe symptoms. Read more...

In Healthy Gut, Microbes Wax, Wane Throughout Day

December 3, 2014 10:57 am | News | Comments

Taking a single snapshot of all the bacteria that live in a mouse’s–or person’s–stomach and intestines can capture the health of the organism’s digestive system and even their risk of developing immune diseases and cancers. But it might take more than one snapshot to get a full picture, Salk researchers have discovered. Read more...

Another Case Against the Midnight Snack

December 3, 2014 10:49 am | News | Comments

These days, with the abundance of artificial light, TV, tablets and smartphones, adults and children alike are burning the midnight oil. What they are not burning is calories: with later bedtimes comes the tendency to eat. Read more...                                 

Detecting Gene Mutations Misses People at High Risk of Cancer

December 3, 2014 10:27 am | News | Comments

Research led by a University of Manchester academic on the BRCA gene mutation in the Jewish population shows that the current process of identifying people which relies on assessing someone’s family history, misses half the people who have the mutation and are at risk of developing cancer. Read more...

Learning a Second Language: First-Rate Exercise for the Brain

December 3, 2014 8:30 am | by Bioscience Technology Staff | Articles | Comments

The brain is so exquisitely sensitive to language that it only takes six weeks of learning Chinese for the neurons of English speakers to rewire. And those whose brains are fully bilingual are more facile at learning generally.       

The Future of Treatments for Spinal Cord Injury

December 2, 2014 12:57 pm | by Christina Jakubowski, Managing Editor | Articles | Comments

There may be hope to get millions of individuals with chronic spinal cord injury (SCI) moving again, according to research presented at Neuroscience 2014, the 44th annual meeting of the Society for Neuroscience (SFN) in Washington, D.C.   

Alcohol Abuse Linked to Newly Identified Gene Network

December 2, 2014 12:46 pm | News | Comments

Researchers have identified a network of genes that appear to work together in determining alcohol dependence. The findings could lead to future treatments and therapies for alcoholics and possibly help doctors screen for alcoholism.     

Identifying the Cellular Origin of Fibrosis

December 2, 2014 12:32 pm | News | Comments

Researchers have identified what they believe to be the cells responsible for fibrosis, the buildup of scar tissue. Fibrotic diseases are estimated to be responsible for up to 45 percent of deaths in the developed world.       

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