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Artificial Retina Could Someday Help Restore Vision

November 13, 2014 10:18 am | News | Comments

The loss of eyesight, often caused by retinal degeneration, is a life-altering health issue for many people. A new development toward a prosthetic retina could help counter conditions that result from problems with this crucial part of the eye.   

The Backwards Brain

November 13, 2014 10:01 am | News | Comments

Humans, like many animals, are accustomed to seeing objects pass behind us as we go forward. Moving backwards feels unnatural. In a new study, scientists reveal that moving forward actually trains the brain to perceive the world normally.    

Gene Study Boosts Interest in Heart Drug

November 12, 2014 5:57 pm | by Marilynn Marchione - AP Chief Medical Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

Scientists have discovered gene mutations that give people naturally lower cholesterol levels and cut their risk of heart disease in half. That discovery may have a big implication for a blockbuster heart drug.           

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Gene May Protect Against Typhoid Fever

November 12, 2014 8:30 am | News | Comments

People who carry a particular type of gene have natural resistance against typhoid fever according to new research. The study is the first large-scale, unbiased search for human genes that affect a person’s risk of typhoid.        

Altered Milk Protein Can Deliver AIDS Drug to Infants

November 12, 2014 8:30 am | News | Comments

A novel method of altering a protein in milk to bind with an antiretroviral drug promises to greatly improve treatment for infants and young children suffering from HIV/AIDS, according to new research.              

Controlling Genes with Thoughts

November 12, 2014 8:30 am | News | Comments

Researchers have developed the first gene network to be operated via brainwaves. Depending on the user’s thoughts, it can produce various amounts of a desired molecule.                       

Enriched Environments Hold Promise for Brain Injury Patients

November 12, 2014 8:30 am | News | Comments

A new study from Tel Aviv University found that an "enriched environment"— specially enhanced surroundings— led to rehabilitation of mice following traumatic brain injury.                       

Eye’s Response to TV Helps ID Diseases

November 12, 2014 8:30 am | News | Comments

One of the leading causes of blindness worldwide could be detected by how our eyes respond to watching TV, according to a new study. The researchers found that they could identify eye diseases by looking at maps of people's eye movements while they watched a film.

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The Brain’s 'Inner GPS' Gets Dismantled

November 11, 2014 12:22 pm | News | Comments

Imagine being able to recognize your car as your own but never being able to remember where you parked it. Researchers have induced this all-too-common human experience– or a close version of it– permanently in rats.           

Playing Action Video Games Can Boost Learning

November 11, 2014 11:26 am | News | Comments

A new study shows for the first time that playing action video games improves not just the skills taught in the game, but learning capabilities more generally.                          

Scientists Solve Mystery of ‘Frankenstein’ DNA

November 11, 2014 11:19 am | Videos | Comments

Scientists have uncovered how the massive DNA molecules that appear in some tumors are formed like Frankenstein’s monster, stitched together from other parts of the genome.                       

Long-term Marijuana Use Affects Brain Function, Structure

November 11, 2014 10:37 am | News | Comments

Researchers for the first time comprehensively describe existing abnormalities in brain function and structure of long-term marijuana users with multiple MRI techniques.                      

Ebola Health Lessons: A Wake-up Call

November 11, 2014 8:30 am | by Stephanie Guzowski, Editor, Drug Discovery & Development | Articles | Comments

After months of delayed, fragmented responses, the international medical community recognized Ebola as a threat to global health security. Here’s where the situation stands today as well as questions raised and lessons learned.        

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Fighting HIV with Stem Cells and Cutting-edge Genetics

November 10, 2014 2:34 pm | by Cynthia Fox, Science Writer | Articles | Comments

“Berlin Patient” Timothy Brown was cured of HIV after he received stem cells from a naturally immune patient. His story inspired two companies to try and recreate that natural immunity in HIV patients using stem cells and cutting-edge gene-editing. Now Harvard has joined the race.

DNA Sequencing Helps Spot Glaucoma Defects

November 10, 2014 2:03 pm | News | Comments

Scientists have sequenced the mitochondrial genome in glaucoma patients to help further understanding into the genetic basis for the disease. Glaucoma is a major cause of irreversible blindness, affecting more than 60 million people worldwide.  

The Power of the Power Nap

November 10, 2014 1:50 pm | News | Comments

For hibernating mammals, the pre-winter months are a race against time to accumulate enough energy reserves to last until spring. Offspring born late in the year have much less time to achieve this. New research shows that power-napping can help late-born garden dormice overcome these unfavorable odds.

Researchers ID First Steps in Pancreatic Cancer Formation

November 10, 2014 1:43 pm | News | Comments

Researchers say they have identified first steps in the origin of pancreatic cancer and that their findings suggest preventive strategies to explore. In a new study, the scientists described the molecular steps necessary for acinar cells in the pancreas to become precancerous lesions.

U.S. Opens New Ebola Treatment Unit in Liberia

November 10, 2014 10:57 am | by Jonathan Paye-Layleh - Associated Press - Associated Press | News | Comments

The United States Monday opened the first of 17 Ebola treatment units it is building in Liberia. The new clinic opened in Tubmanburg, about 60 kilometers (40 miles) north of the capital, Monrovia.                

Researchers Identify New Genetic Cause of Epilepsy

November 7, 2014 11:56 am | News | Comments

A research team has used whole genome sequencing to identify a new genetic cause of a severe, rare and complex form of epilepsy that becomes evident in early childhood and can lead to early death.               

Stem Cell Transplants for Parkinson’s Edging Closer

November 7, 2014 11:47 am | Videos | Comments

A major breakthrough in the development of stem cell-derived brain cells has put researchers on a firm path towards the first-ever stem cell transplantations in people with Parkinson’s disease.                 

Identical Genes Don’t Hinder Bacteria's Ability to Adapt

November 7, 2014 11:30 am | News | Comments

Bacteria in colonies don’t reproduce sexually and are genetically identical, yet they can prepare in advance for changing environmental conditions. Researchers have shown that bacteria carry out this strategy by producing cells with differing amounts of specific proteins that govern their response to chemical signals.

Migration Negation

November 7, 2014 11:21 am | News | Comments

Most cancer deaths occur because of metastasis, yet progress in preventing and treating migratory cancer cells has been slow. Scientists have now identified a cellular culprit that should help researchers better understand how metastasis begins.  

Worst-ever Ebola Epidemic by the Numbers

November 7, 2014 5:56 am | by Maria Cheng - AP Medical Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

As the biggest-ever outbreak of Ebola continues to ravage West Africa, here are a few key numbers to get a handle on the epidemic.                                   

Vaccine Spray May Not Work for Swine Flu in Kids

November 6, 2014 3:55 pm | by Mike Stobbe - AP Medical Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

The nasal spray version of the flu vaccine did not protect young children against swine flu last winter and might not work again this year, health officials said Thursday.                       

Ebola and Marburg are Millions of Years Old, Not Thousands

November 6, 2014 2:19 pm | by Cynthia Fox, Science Writer | Articles | Comments

Ebola and Marburg are 16 to 23 million years old, not thousands of years old as once thought, according to a new study. The research also indicates that while Ebola and Marburg diverged from each other millions of years ago.    

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