Advertisement
Disease Research
Subscribe to Disease Research
View Sample

FREE Email Newsletter

Next-Generation Sequencing and the Transformation of Cancer Care

August 18, 2014 3:20 pm | by Darren Lee, Vice President, Marketing & Business Development, Nabsys | White Papers

NGS is revolutionizing the field of genome biology, with much faster data generation, increased accuracy, and a dramatic reduction of sequencing costs. Multiple genomes can now be sequenced in parallel by a single instrument in a matter of days. In the medical field, NGS is already having an impact in genetic screening and holds great potential in oncology, given the genetic aspects of cancerous disease.

Do Gut Bacteria Rule Our Minds?

August 18, 2014 12:46 pm | News | Comments

It sounds like science fiction, but it seems that bacteria within us– which outnumber our own cells about 100-fold– may very well be affecting both our cravings and moods to get us to eat what they want, and often are driving us toward obesity.  

Can Twitter Help Better Identify Foodborne Illness Cases?

August 18, 2014 12:33 pm | News | Comments

An estimated 55 million to 105 million people in the United States suffer from foodborne illnesses each year, according to the CDC, resulting in costs of $2 to $4 billion annually. What if Twitter could be used to track those cases and more quickly identify the source of the problem?

Advertisement

Epigenetic Breakthrough Bolsters Understanding of Alzheimer’s

August 18, 2014 12:12 pm | News | Comments

A team of researchers has uncovered some of the strongest evidence yet that epigenetic changes in the brain play a role in Alzheimer’s disease. The current study found that chemical modifications to DNA within the ANK1 gene are strongly associated with measures of neuropathology in the brain. 

Antibiotics in Early Life May Alter Long-term Immunity

August 18, 2014 11:34 am | News | Comments

New research found that receiving antibiotic treatments early in life can increase susceptibility to specific diseases later on. The study helps scientists understand how different antibiotics affect good bacteria.        

Suspect Gene Corrupts Neural Connections

August 18, 2014 10:58 am | News | Comments

A genetic variation linked to schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and severe depression wreaks havoc on connections among neurons in the developing brain, a team of researchers reports.                    

Another Ebola Problem: Finding Its Natural Source

August 17, 2014 9:17 am | by Mike Stobbe and Marilynn Marchione - AP Medical Writers - Associated Press | News | Comments

A scary problem lurks beyond the frenzied efforts to keep people from spreading Ebola: No one knows exactly where the virus comes from or how to stop it from seeding new outbreaks.                    

Bioscience Technology This Week #8: Safe Nuts for Allergy Sufferers

August 15, 2014 12:43 pm | Videos | Comments

On this episode of Bioscience Technology This Week, Christina Jakubowski reports on the possibility of making nuts safer to eat for those with allergies. Our second story tackles important questions about which genes may drive antibiotic resistance. 

Advertisement

Lasers Can Control Mouse Brain Switchboard

August 15, 2014 12:31 pm | Videos | Comments

Ever wonder why it’s hard to focus after a bad night’s sleep? Using mice and flashes of light, scientists show that just a few nerve cells in the brain may control the switch between internal thoughts and external distractions.         

CDC Scientist Kept Quiet About Flu Blunder

August 15, 2014 12:21 pm | by Mike Stobbe - AP Medical Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

An investigation into a potentially dangerous blunder at a government lab found that a scientist kept silent about the accident and revealed it only after other employees noticed something fishy.               

Previous Pulmonary Disease May Up Lung Cancer Risk

August 15, 2014 12:14 pm | News | Comments

Links between a number of common respiratory diseases and an increased risk of developing lung cancer have been found in a large pooled analysis of seven studies involving more than 25,000 individuals.               

Early Antibiotic Exposure Gives Mice Lifelong Metabolic Issues

August 15, 2014 11:59 am | News | Comments

A new study suggests that antibiotic exposure during a critical window of early development disrupts the bacterial landscape of the gut, home to trillions of diverse microbes, and permanently reprograms the body’s metabolism, setting up a predisposition to obesity.

Single Enzyme is Necessary for Development of Diabetes

August 15, 2014 11:04 am | News | Comments

An enzyme called 12-LO promotes the obesity-induced oxidative stress in the pancreatic cells that leads to pre-diabetes, and diabetes. 12-LO’s enzymatic action is the last step in the production of certain small molecules that harm the cell, according to a team from Indiana University School of Medicine. The findings will enable the development of drugs that can interfere with this enzyme, preventing or even reversing diabetes.

Advertisement

Ebola Puts Focus on Drugs Made in Tobacco Plants

August 15, 2014 2:22 am | by Malcolm Ritter - AP Science Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

It's an eye-catching angle in the story of an experimental treatment for Ebola: The drug comes from tobacco plants that were turned into living pharmaceutical factories. Using plants this way — sometimes called "pharming" — can produce complex and valuable proteins for medicines.

Immune Cell Discovery Could Help to Halt Cancer Spread

August 14, 2014 2:09 pm | News | Comments

Melbourne researchers have revealed the critical importance of highly specialized immune cells, called natural killer cells, in killing melanoma cells that have spread to the lungs. These natural killer cells could be harnessed to hunt down and kill cancers that have spread in the body.

Autism, SPD Hit Different Brain Areas

August 14, 2014 11:10 am | by Cynthia Fox | Articles | Comments

Children with sensory processing disorder (SPD) have decreased white matter brain connections in sensory regions very different from those with autism, say researchers. Their study is the first to compare, and find critical differences in, brain connectivity in autism versus SPD versus controls.

NewLink Genetics: Ready to Test Ebola Vaccine

August 14, 2014 10:22 am | by The Associated Press | News | Comments

An Iowa drug developer says it has enough doses of a possible vaccine for the deadly Ebola virus to launch an initial round of human testing. NewLink Genetics Chief Financial Officer Gordon Link says the timing of the trials is uncertain, but the company is receiving help from a number of sources to speed up the process.

Injected Bacteria Shrink Tumors in Rats, Dogs, Humans

August 14, 2014 10:17 am | News | Comments

A modified version of the Clostridium novyi (C. novyi-NT) bacterium can produce a strong and precisely targeted anti-tumor response in rats, dogs and now humans, according to a new report.                 

Study Questions Need for Cutting Salt

August 13, 2014 5:18 pm | by Marilynn Marchione - AP Chief Medical Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

A large international study questions the conventional wisdom that most people should cut back on salt, suggesting that the amount most folks consume is OK for heart health - and too little may be as bad as too much.         

Bioscience Technology This Week #7: Fruit Flies Unlock the Mysteries of Diabetes

August 13, 2014 2:20 pm | Videos | Comments

In this episode of Bioscience Technology This Week, Rob Fee discusses how studying fruit flies could revolutionize diabetes research. Our second story focuses on how venom could form the basis of a new class of cancerfighting drugs.    

New Analysis Reveals Tumor Weaknesses

August 13, 2014 1:47 pm | News | Comments

Scientists have known for decades that cancer can be caused by genetic mutations, but more recently they have discovered that chemical modifications of a gene can also contribute to cancer. These alterations, known as epigenetic modifications, control whether a gene is turned on or off.

Involuntary Eye Movement a Foolproof Indication for ADHD Diagnosis

August 13, 2014 1:38 pm | News | Comments

Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is the most commonly diagnosed—and misdiagnosed—behavioral disorder in children in America, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Unfortunately, there are currently no reliable physiological markers to diagnose ADHD.

Huntingtin Gene Crucial to Memory Development

August 13, 2014 11:50 am | News | Comments

It has been more than 20 years since scientists discovered that mutations in the gene huntingtin cause the devastating progressive neurological condition Huntington’s disease. Surprisingly little, however, has been known about the gene’s role in normal brain activity. Now, new research shows it plays a critical role in long-term memory.

Prostate Cancer Diagnosis Improves with MRI Technology

August 13, 2014 11:03 am | Videos | Comments

Oncologists are melding magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technology with a traditional ultrasound prostate exam to create a three-dimensional map of the prostate that allows physicians to view growths that were previously undetectable.      

Sierra Leone: Another Top Doctor Dies from Ebola

August 13, 2014 9:21 am | by Clarence Roy-Macaulay and Maria Cheng - Associted Press - Associted Press | News | Comments

A leading physician in Sierra Leone's fight against Ebola has died from the disease, an official said Wednesday, as it emerged that another top doctor had been considered to receive an experimental drug but did not get it and later died.    

X
You may login with either your assigned username or your e-mail address.
The password field is case sensitive.
Loading