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New Brain Protein Tied to Alzheimer's Disease

July 16, 2014 3:20 am | by Marilynn Marchione - AP Chief Medical Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

Scientists have linked a new protein to Alzheimer's disease, different from the amyloid and tau that make up the sticky brain plaques and tangles long known to be its hallmarks.                      

Study Pinpoints Damage Alcohol Causes to the Brain

July 15, 2014 12:55 pm | News | Comments

New research has identified, for the first time, the structural damage at a molecular level that excessive alcohol abuse causes to the brain. The study detected the loss and modification of several key cellular proteins in the brains of alcoholics.

Babies’ Brains Rehearse Speech Before First Words

July 15, 2014 12:39 pm | News | Comments

Research in seven- and 11-month-old infants shows that speech sounds stimulate areas of the brain that coordinate and plan motor movements for speech. The study suggests that baby brains start laying down the groundwork of how to form words long before they actually begin to speak.

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Proof: Parkinson's Enhances Creativity

July 15, 2014 12:11 pm | News | Comments

Two years ago, the exceptional creativity of Parkinson's patients was demonstrated in a review for Behavioral Neuroscience. Now, a new empirical study definitively demonstrates that Parkinson's patients are more creative than their healthy peers.

Variations in Neuronal Networks Could Explain Traumatic Brain Injury Outcomes

July 15, 2014 12:00 pm | News | Comments

A team of researchers at the Neuroscience Institute at Georgia State University has discovered that hidden differences in the properties of neural circuits can account for whether animals are behaviorally susceptible to brain injury. These results could have implications for the treatment of brain trauma.

Capturing Cancer: A Powerful New Technique for Early Diagnosis

July 15, 2014 11:53 am | News | Comments

In recent years, aggressive research and substantial financial investments have been directed at discovering pre-symptomatic indicators of cancer, known as biomarkers. But as lead author researchers at Arizona State University’s Biodesign Institute emphasize in a new study, the quest for cancer biomarkers has been stymied by a number of factors. They describe a new technique for early disease detection, which they call immunosignaturing.

Cannabis Compound Could Slow Tumor Growth

July 14, 2014 1:39 pm | News | Comments

Scientists at the University of East Anglia have shown how the main psychoactive ingredient in cannabis could reduce tumor growth in cancer patients. Research  reveals the existence of previously unknown signaling platforms which are responsible for the drug’s success in shrinking tumors. It is hoped that the findings could help develop a synthetic equivalent with anti-cancer properties.

One in Three Alzheimer’s Cases Potentially Preventable, Study Says

July 14, 2014 12:02 pm | News | Comments

A third of Alzheimer’s disease cases worldwide can be attributed to risk factors that can be potentially modified, such as lack of education and physical inactivity, according to new research.                 

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When Good Gut Bacteria Get Sick

July 14, 2014 11:46 am | News | Comments

Being sick due to an infection can make us feel lousy. But what must the ecosystem of bacteria, or microbiota, colonizing our guts be going through when hit with infection? A new study has utilized unique computational models to show how infection can affect bacteria that naturally live in our intestines.

Drinking Alcohol Provides No Heart Health Benefit

July 11, 2014 1:37 pm | News | Comments

Reducing the amount of alcoholic beverages consumed, even for light-to-moderate drinkers, may improve cardiovascular health, including a reduced risk of coronary heart disease, lower body mass index (BMI), and blood pressure, according to a new multi-center study.

Bacterial Respiratory Tract Colonization Prior to Catching the Flu May Protect Against Severe Illness

July 11, 2014 1:10 pm | News | Comments

Many studies have shown that more severe illness and even death are likely to result if you develop a secondary respiratory infection after developing influenza. Now, however, a team of researchers based at The Wistar Institute has determined that if you reverse the order of infection, the bacteria Streptococcus pneumoniae (often called pneumococcus) may actually protect against a bad case of the flu.

Mouse Study: Natural Birth May Strengthen the Immune System

July 11, 2014 12:54 pm | News | Comments

Health researchers from the University of Copenhagen have uncovered new knowledge about the immune system in a mouse study, which indicates that natural birth improves the immune system of the pups. A number of studies suggest that children delivered by Caesarean section have a different intestinal flora than children delivered by natural birth. But it is still unknown why this is the case and what it means for the immune system.

Gene Therapy Brings ALS Cure One Step Closer

July 11, 2014 12:44 pm | News | Comments

Researchers have moved one step closer to a gene therapy that could silence the faulty SOD1 gene responsible for triggering a form of motor neuron disease also known as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS).             

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Scientists Shed New Light on Nerve Cell Growth

July 11, 2014 12:03 pm | News | Comments

In a new study, scientists have shed new light on these complex processes, showing that a particular protein plays a far more sophisticated role in neuron development than previously thought.                 

Girl Hoped to Have Been Cured of HIV Has Relapsed

July 11, 2014 8:30 am | by Marilynn Marchione - AP Chief Medical Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

A Mississippi girl born with the AIDS virus and in remission for years despite stopping treatment now shows signs that she still harbors HIV — and therefore is not cured.                       

Viral Evasion: How Measles, Nipah Elude Detection

July 9, 2014 4:39 pm | News | Comments

Scientists have discovered that measles and Nipah viruses manipulate the phosphorylation state of the immune sensor MDA5, keeping it inactive while the virus enters cells and replicates.                   

Vitamin D Ups Bowel Cancer Survival

July 9, 2014 4:31 pm | News | Comments

Bowel cancer patients with high levels of vitamin D in their blood are more likely to survive the disease, a new study shows. Patients with the highest levels of vitamin D have half the risk of dying compared with those with the lowest levels, the findings reveal.

Bacteria Hijack Plentiful Iron Supply Source to Flourish

July 9, 2014 4:21 pm | News | Comments

In an era of increasing concern about the prevalence of antibiotic-resistant illness, researchers have identified a promising new pathway to disabling disease: blocking bacteria’s access to iron in the body.             

Study Cracks How the Brain Processes Emotions

July 9, 2014 4:05 pm | News | Comments

Although feelings are personal and subjective, the human brain turns them into a standard code that objectively represents emotions across different senses, situations and even people, reports a new study by Cornell University neuroscientist Adam Anderson.

New Mutations Found in Most Common Form of Lung Cancer

July 9, 2014 3:54 pm | News | Comments

Researchers have identified novel mutations in a well-known cancer-causing pathway in lung adenocarcinoma, the most common subtype of lung cancer. Knowledge of these genomic changes may expand the number of possible therapeutic targets for this disease and potentially identify a greater number of patients with treatable mutations because many potent cancer drugs that target these mutations already exist.

Not at Home on the Range

July 9, 2014 3:44 pm | News | Comments

As climate change shifts the geographic ranges in which animals can be found, concern mounts over the effect it has on their parasites. Does an increased range for a host mean new territory for its parasites as well? Not necessarily, says a team of UC Santa Barbara scientists.  

When Faced With Some Sugars, Bacteria Can Be Picky Eaters

July 9, 2014 12:18 pm | News | Comments

Researchers from North Carolina State University and the University of Minnesota have found for the first time that genetically identical strains of bacteria can respond very differently to the presence of sugars and other organic molecules in the environment, with some individual bacteria devouring the sugars and others ignoring it.

Huntington’s Disease Protein Helps Wire the Young Brain

July 9, 2014 12:07 pm | News | Comments

The protein that is mutated in Huntington’s disease is critical for wiring the brain in early life, according to a new Duke University study. The new findings add to growing evidence that Huntington’s and other neurodegenerative disorders, such as Alzheimer’s disease, may take root during development.

Tiny DNA Pyramids Enter Bacteria Easily and Deliver a Deadly Payload

July 9, 2014 11:53 am | News | Comments

Bacterial infections usually announce themselves with pain and fever but often can be defeated with antibiotics—and then there are those that are sneaky and hard to beat. Now, scientists have built a new weapon against such pathogens in the form of tiny DNA pyramids. Their study found the nanopyramids can flag bacteria and kill more of them than medicine alone.

Bioscience Technology This Week #1: Tick Bites Pack Double Punch

July 9, 2014 11:24 am | Videos | Comments

On this episode of Bioscience Technology This Week, Editor-in-Chief Rob Fee reports on the possible double-punch of tick bites and how to control and undo years of heart damage.                   

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