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Brain Scan Predicts Who Responds Best to Certain Treatment for OCD

June 24, 2015 10:44 am | by UCLA | News | Comments

A new study by researchers suggests that a certain detail from patients’ brain scans could help clinicians identify which people are more likely to relapse after cognitive-behavioral therapy — and why.

Specific Roles of Adult Neural Stem Cells May Be Determined Before Birth

June 24, 2015 10:18 am | by University of California San Francisco | News | Comments

Study in mice suggests that stem cells in the brain may not be able to develop into many different cell types.

Doctors Propose Tool to Help Gauge the Value of Cancer Drugs

June 24, 2015 9:58 am | by Marilynn Marchione, Associated Press | News | Comments

The pushback against soaring cancer drug prices is gaining steam. A leading doctors group on Monday proposed a formula to help patients decide if a medicine is worth it - what it will cost them and how much good it is likely to do.

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Eavesdropping on the Body: New Device Tracks Chemical Signals Within Cells

June 24, 2015 9:39 am | by University of Toronto | News | Comments

Biomedical engineers have invented a new device that more quickly and accurately "listens in" on the chemical messages that tell our cells how to multiply.

Smart Insulin Patch Could Replace Painful Injections for Diabetes

June 23, 2015 10:50 am | by UNC | News | Comments

Painful insulin injections could become a thing of the past for the millions of Americans who suffer from diabetes, thanks to a new invention from researchers who have created a “smart insulin patch” that can detect increases in blood sugar levels and secrete doses of insulin into the bloodstream whenever needed.

Saliva Exonerated

June 23, 2015 10:33 am | by Harvard University | News | Comments

Gene previously linked to obesity is unrelated, says new study.

Autism Associated with Superior Visual Skills in Infancy

June 23, 2015 9:28 am | by Cynthia Fox, Science Writer | Articles | Comments

For the first time, a study has shown that infants with emerging autism at 15 months, and two years, can earlier—even at nine months—display enhanced visual searching ability.

Sequencing Ebola’s Secrets

June 22, 2015 11:06 am | by Harvard University | News | Comments

Study provides deep insights into course, makeup of deadly disease.

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New Sleep Genes Found

June 22, 2015 10:32 am | by Thomas Jefferson University | News | Comments

Researchers discover that a protein called Taranis could hold the key to a good night's sleep.

Pancreatic Cancer Treatment Pipeline Dominated by Early-Stage Development

June 22, 2015 9:07 am | by Joshua Libberton, Analyst, GBI Research | Articles | Comments

While the Phase III portion of the pipeline is comparatively small, it is followed by a relatively large Phase II, indicating that there will be a sustained stream of products moving through the later development stages.

Lasers, Magnetism Allow Glimpses of the Human Brain at Work

June 22, 2015 9:06 am | by Malcolm Ritter, AP Science Writer | News | Comments

To the untrained eye, the graph looked like a very volatile day on Wall Street - jagged peaks and valleys in red, blue and green, displayed on a wall. But the story it told was not about economics. It was a glimpse into the brains of Shaul Yahil and Shaw Bronner, two researchers at a Yale lab, as they had a little chat.

Bioscience Bulletin: Benefits of Chocolate; Performance Based on Pupils; the Thin Line Between Madness and Genius

June 19, 2015 4:25 pm | by Bevin Fletcher, Associate Editor | News | Comments

Welcome to Bioscience Technologys new series Bioscience Bulletin, where we bring you the five most popular headlines from the week.

North Korea Says it Cured Cancer, AIDS, Ebola with Wonder Drug

June 19, 2015 4:16 pm | by Seth Augenstein, Digital Reporter | News | Comments

North Korea — which has allegedly starved millions of its people and is unable to treat even modest medical problems such as cataracts — has a new drug on the market that it says can cure AIDS, Ebola and some cancers.

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Scientists Identify Amino Acid that Stops Seizures in Mice

June 19, 2015 10:16 am | by Johns Hopkins | News | Comments

An amino acid whose role in the body has been all but a mystery appears to act as a potent seizure inhibitor in mice, according to a study.

Musicians Not Only Hear in Tune, They Also See in Tune

June 19, 2015 9:59 am | by Vanderbilt University | News | Comments

Musicians don’t just hear in tune, they also see in tune. That is the conclusion of the latest scientific experiment designed to puzzle out how the brain creates an apparently seamless view of the external world based on the information it receives from the eyes.

Uncovering a Dynamic Cortex

June 19, 2015 8:58 am | by Rob Matheson, MIT | News | Comments

Neuroscientists show that multiple cortical regions are needed to process information.

Genes Linked to High Blood Pressure Associated with Lower Alzheimer’s Risk

June 18, 2015 11:10 am | by Alzheimer's Research UK | News | Comments

A new study has linked genetic variants which increase the risk of high blood pressure to a lower risk of Alzheimer’s disease. The research suggests a possible protective effect for treatments used to reduce blood pressure.

MIT Scientists Make Mice Total Recall Happy Memories to Beat Depression

June 18, 2015 10:49 am | by Seth Augenstein, Digital Reporter | Articles | Comments

Happy memories can be re-activated in the brains of depressed mice, effectively bringing back the good times, according to MIT research released this week.

BIO 2015: Three Intriguing Biotech Companies Featured at the Convention

June 18, 2015 8:50 am | by Ryan Bushey, Associate Editor | Articles | Comments

These three businesses had exhibits in an area of the convention center called BIO Metropolis.

Study Points to Drug Target for Huntington’s Disease

June 17, 2015 11:34 am | by The Scripps Research Institute | News | Comments

Huntington’s disease attacks the part of the brain that controls movement, destroying nerves with a barrage of toxicity, yet leaves other parts relatively unscathed.

‘Core’ Immune Cells Reduce Symptoms, Spread of Seasonal and Pandemic Influenza

June 17, 2015 11:19 am | by University of Oxford | News | Comments

Research shows that certain T cells, immune cells that fight infection, can help to control influenza infections by targeting a core structural protein common to all strains of influenza .

Blood Protein May Indicate Risk of Alzheimer's Disease

June 17, 2015 10:41 am | by King's College London | News | Comments

Scientists have identified a single blood protein that may indicate the development of Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) years before symptoms appear, a disorder that has been associated with an increased risk of Alzheimer's disease or other dementias.

DDT’s Health Effects Continue to Ripple, with New Breast Cancer Link

June 17, 2015 10:12 am | by Seth Augenstein, Digital Reporter | News | Comments

DDT was a wonder pesticide, which turned the tide on everything from bed bugs to malaria-carrying mosquitoes during the 20th century. But even after its health and environmental effects were acknowledged and its agricultural use was banned in 1972, its toxic legacy continues, according to a new study.

Chocolate — it’s Good for Your Heart, New Study Says

June 17, 2015 9:55 am | by Bevin Fletcher, Associate Editor | Articles | Comments

Chocolate-lovers rejoice: new research says eating up to 100g of chocolate every day is linked to lower cardiovascular risks such as heart disease and stroke.

Avocados May Hold Answer to Beating Leukemia

June 16, 2015 9:12 am | by University of Waterloo | News | Comments

Rich, creamy, nutritious and now cancer fighting. New research reveals that molecules derived from avocados could be effective in treating a form of cancer.

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