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Researchers Successfully Eliminate the HIV Virus from Cultured Human Cells

July 22, 2014 1:49 pm | Videos | Comments

The HIV-1 virus has proved to be tenacious, inserting its genome permanently into its victims' DNA, forcing patients to take a lifelong drug regimen to control the virus and prevent a fresh attack. Now, a team of Temple University School of Medicine researchers has designed a way to snip out the integrated HIV-1 genes for good.

Mixed Genes Mix Up the Migrations of Hybrid Birds

July 22, 2014 1:23 pm | News | Comments

Mixed genes appear to drive hybrid birds to select more difficult routes than their parent...

New Technique Maps Life's Effects on Our DNA

July 21, 2014 1:39 pm | News | Comments

Researchers have developed a powerful new single-cell technique to help investigate how the...

Common Gene Variants Account for Most Genetic Risk for Autism

July 21, 2014 11:26 am | News | Comments

Most of the genetic risk for autism comes from versions of genes that are common in the...

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Managing Ecosystems via Genomics

July 18, 2014 2:11 pm | News | Comments

A cross-disciplinary team is calling for public discussion about a potential new way to solve longstanding global ecological problems by using an emerging technology called “gene drives.” The advance could potentially lead to powerful new ways of combating malaria and other insect-borne diseases.

New Gene Discovered that Stops the Spread of Deadly Cancer

July 18, 2014 2:01 pm | Videos | Comments

Scientists at the Salk Institute have identified a gene responsible for stopping the movement of cancer from the lungs to other parts of the body, indicating a new way to fight one of the world's deadliest cancers. By identifying the cause of this metastasis—which often happens quickly in lung cancer and results in a bleak survival rate—Salk scientists are able to explain why some tumors are more prone to spreading than others.

Danish DNA Could be Key to Happiness

July 18, 2014 1:49 pm | News | Comments

Economists at the University’s Centre for Competitive Advantage in the Global Economy (CAGE) have looked at why certain countries top the world happiness rankings. In particular they have found the closer a nation is to the genetic makeup of Denmark, the happier that country is. The research could help to solve the puzzle of why a country like Denmark so regularly tops the world happiness rankings.

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Scientists Identify Gene that Plays a Surprising Role in Combating Aging

July 18, 2014 1:44 pm | News | Comments

It is something of an eternal question: Can we slow or even reverse the aging process? Even though genetic manipulations can, in fact, alter some cellular dynamics, little is known about the mechanisms of the aging process in living organisms. Now scientists from the Florida campus of The Scripps Research Institute have found in animal models that a single gene plays a surprising role in aging that can be detected early on in development.

Researchers Uncover New Cancer Cell Vulnerability

July 18, 2014 12:52 pm | News | Comments

Researchers have uncovered a genetic vulnerability of cancer cells that express telomerase— an enzyme that drives their unchecked growth— and showed that telomerase-expressing cells depend upon a gene named p21 for their survival.      

Transplantation of Healthy New Brain Cells Reverses Learning and Memory Loss in Alzheimer’s Disease Model

July 16, 2014 2:10 pm | News | Comments

A new study from the Gladstone Institutes has revealed a way to alleviate the learning and memory deficits caused by apoE4, the most important genetic risk factor for Alzheimer’s disease, improving cognition to normal levels in aged mice.

A-maize-ing Double Life of a Genome

July 15, 2014 12:06 pm | News | Comments

Early maize farmers selected for genes that improved the harvesting of sunlight, a new detailed study of how plants use 'doubles' of their genomes reveals. The findings could help current efforts to improve existing crop varieties. Oxford University researchers captured a 'genetic snapshot' of maize as it existed 10 million years ago when the plant made a double of its genome—a 'whole genome duplication' event.

Friends Share Genetic Similarities

July 15, 2014 11:33 am | News | Comments

If you consider your friends family, you may be on to something. A new study finds that friends who are not biologically related still resemble each other genetically.                        

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Stem Cell Scientists Lay a TRAP for Disease

July 14, 2014 2:09 pm | News | Comments

USC Stem Cell scientists have set a “mouse TRAP” to capture the early signs of kidney failure. Their new transgenic mouse line uses a technique called TRAP to extract cellular and genetic information from a variety of solid organs. TRAP involves attaching a fluorescent tag to the ribosomes of the cell type of interest. Scientists can then collect the tagged ribosomes and determine which active genes are ordering proteins to be made. 

Gene Therapy Brings ALS Cure One Step Closer

July 11, 2014 12:44 pm | News | Comments

Researchers have moved one step closer to a gene therapy that could silence the faulty SOD1 gene responsible for triggering a form of motor neuron disease also known as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS).             

No Extra Mutations in Modified Stem Cells, Study Finds

July 9, 2014 4:16 pm | News | Comments

Scientists have proven that using gene-editing techniques on stem cells doesn't increase the overall occurrence of mutations in the cells.                                

When Faced With Some Sugars, Bacteria Can Be Picky Eaters

July 9, 2014 12:18 pm | News | Comments

Researchers from North Carolina State University and the University of Minnesota have found for the first time that genetically identical strains of bacteria can respond very differently to the presence of sugars and other organic molecules in the environment, with some individual bacteria devouring the sugars and others ignoring it.

Tiny DNA Pyramids Enter Bacteria Easily and Deliver a Deadly Payload

July 9, 2014 11:53 am | News | Comments

Bacterial infections usually announce themselves with pain and fever but often can be defeated with antibiotics—and then there are those that are sneaky and hard to beat. Now, scientists have built a new weapon against such pathogens in the form of tiny DNA pyramids. Their study found the nanopyramids can flag bacteria and kill more of them than medicine alone.

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Breaking News: Same Genes Drive Math, Reading Ability

July 8, 2014 11:00 am | News | Comments

Around half of the genes that influence how well a child can read also play a role in their mathematics ability, according to scientists who led a study into the genetic basis of cognitive traits.              

Schizophrenia-associated Gene Variation Affects Brain Cell Development

July 7, 2014 2:46 pm | News | Comments

Researchers have begun to connect the dots between a schizophrenia-linked genetic variation and its effect on the developing brain. Their experiments show that the loss of a particular gene alters the skeletons of developing brain cells, which in turn disrupts the orderly layers those cells would normally form.

Pseudogenes May Provide Clearer Understanding of Biomarkers

July 7, 2014 11:36 am | News | Comments

Researchers completed a study that generated pseudogene expression profiles in 2,808 patient samples representing seven cancer types. The results indicated that the science of pseudogene expression analysis may very well play a key role in explaining how cancer occurs.

Genetically Driven Gut Feelings Help Female Flies Choose Mates

July 3, 2014 8:30 am | News | Comments

The elaborate courtship dance done by flies combines multiple motor skills with advanced sensory cues. Remarkably, this behavior is entirely innate. Now, researchers have determined that the Abdominal-B (Abd-B) gene is important for this complex behavior.

Treasure Trove of Genes Key to Kidney Cancer

July 2, 2014 9:24 am | Videos | Comments

A genomic analysis of clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC), the most common form of kidney cancer, from 72 patients has uncovered 31 genes that are key to development, growth and spread of the cancer, according to researchers.      

Cancer Risk: Aspirin and Smoking Affect Aging of Genes

July 1, 2014 11:23 am | News | Comments

The risk of developing cancer increases with age. Factors like smoking and regular aspirin use also affect the risk of cancer—although in the opposite sense. Researchers from the University of Basel were now able to show that aspirin use and smoking both influence aging processes of the female genome that are connected to colorectal cancer.

Evolution of Life's Operating System Revealed in Detail

July 1, 2014 10:46 am | News | Comments

The evolution of the ribosome, a large molecular structure found in the cells of all species, has been revealed in unprecedented detail in a new study.                             

Reconstructing the Life History of a Single Cell

June 30, 2014 11:09 am | News | Comments

By looking at the copy of the human genome present in healthy cells, researchers were able to build a picture of each cell's development from the early embryo on its journey to become part of an adult organ.             

Sequencing Electric Eel Genome Unlocks Shocking Secrets

June 27, 2014 2:17 pm | Videos | Comments

The genome of the electric eel has been sequenced. This discovery has revealed the secret of how fishes with electric organs have evolved six times in the history of life to produce electricity outside of their bodies. The research sheds light on the genetic blueprint used to evolve these complex, novel organs.

Diabolical Duo: Breast Cancer Gene Needs Partner to Grow

June 27, 2014 1:36 pm | News | Comments

A new study has revealed that the gene Metadherin— which is implicated in promoting the spread of breast cancer tumors— only stimulates tumor growth when the protein made by the gene interacts with a second protein known as SND1.      

Using DNA to Monitor Environments

June 27, 2014 12:52 pm | News | Comments

Environmental policy must respond to ever-changing conditions on the ground and in the water, but doing so requires a constant flow of information about the living world. Now, scientists propose employing emerging environmental DNA sampling techniques that could make assessing the biodiversity of marine ecosystems as easy as taking a water sample.

Fruit Flies Help Scientists Uncover Genes Responsible for Human Communication

June 26, 2014 12:46 pm | News | Comments

The genes involved in learning language skills are far from completely understood. Now, using a gene identified in fruit flies by a University of Missouri researcher, scientists involved in a global consortium have discovered a crucial component of the origin of language in humans.

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