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The Lead

New Molecule Could Slow Progression of Parkinson's

February 26, 2015 10:22 am | by University of Bath | News | Comments

Researchers have designed a molecule that, if developed into a drug, could slow the progression of Parkinson's Disease.                       

Skin Test May Shed New Light on Alzheimer's, Parkinson's Diseases

February 25, 2015 9:32 am | by American Adcademy of Neurology | News | Comments

The study showed that skin biopsies can be used to detect elevated levels of abnormal proteins...

Obesity Genes Identified by Worldwide Research Team

February 24, 2015 9:43 am | by Queensland University of Technology | News | Comments

A massive worldwide analysis of genetic data from almost 340,000 people around the world has...

WHO Approves 1st Quick Test for Ebola

February 20, 2015 4:31 pm | by Associated Press | News | Comments

The World Health Organization said Friday it has approved a quick test for Ebola that will...

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Auditory Pain Pathway May Protect Against Hearing Loss

February 19, 2015 11:37 am | by Marla Paul, Northwestern University | News | Comments

Our hearing has a secret bodyguard: a newly discovered connection from the cochlea to the brain that warns of intense incoming noise that causes tissue damage and hearing loss.              

New Nanogel for Drug Delivery

February 19, 2015 11:31 am | by Anne Trafton, MIT | News | Comments

Scientists are interested in using gels to deliver drugs because they can be molded into specific shapes and designed to release their payload over a specified time period. However, current versions aren’t always practical because must be implanted surgically.

Study Ties More Deaths, Types of Disease, to Smoking

February 12, 2015 2:06 pm | by Marilynn Marchione, Associated Press | News | Comments

Breast cancer, prostate cancer, and even routine infections. A new report ties these and other maladies to smoking and said an additional 60,000 to 120,000 deaths each year in the United States are probably due to tobacco use.      

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90 Percent Approve of Cancer Screening But Uptake is Lower

February 10, 2015 4:35 pm | by Cancer Research UK | News | Comments

The researchers, from Cancer Research UK's Health Behaviour Research Centre at University College London (UCL), interviewed almost 1,900 people aged 50-80 years old about their views on cancer screening.                   

Paper Test for Ebola

February 4, 2015 3:19 pm | by Elizabeth Cooney, Harvard Medical School | News | Comments

A team of researchers are working on a diagnostic machine that can detect Ebola virus and other dangerous microbes.                        

Federal Health Officials Face Tough Questions on Flu Vaccines

February 4, 2015 2:51 pm | by Lauran Neergard - AP Medical Writer | News | Comments

Federal health officials faced tough questions from lawmakers Tuesday about why they didn't take steps to produce a better flu vaccine as it became clear that this year's version wasn't going to offer much protection.       

Stem Cell Therapy Shows Promise for MS Patients

February 4, 2015 2:41 pm | by Nora Dunne, Northwestern University | News | Comments

A preliminary study suggests stem cell transplantation may reverse disability and improve quality of life for patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis.                

Face Blindness Predicted by Structural Differences in Brain

February 2, 2015 2:35 pm | by Leslie Willoughby - Stanford University | News | Comments

Recognizing the faces of family and friends seems vital to social interaction.                                                   

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Harvard's Odyssey Unlocks Big Data

January 28, 2015 2:40 pm | by Harvard Gazette | News | Comments

As technology evolves and becomes further integrated into society, massive amounts of data are being collected and stored.                       

How the Immune System Promotes Digestive Health

January 22, 2015 4:11 pm | by University of Utah | News | Comments

It involves fostering a community of "good" gut bacteria.                                  

Estrogen-Producing Neurons Influence Aggression in Both Sexes

January 22, 2015 4:00 pm | by Pete Farley, UCSF | News | Comments

A miniscule cluster of estrogen-producing nerve cells in the mouse brain exerts highly specific effects on aggressive behavior in both males and females.                  

The Ups and Downs of the Seemingly Idle Brain

January 21, 2015 9:16 am | by Brown University | News | Comments

A new study probed deep into this somewhat mysterious cycle in mice, to learn more about how the mammalian brain accomplishes it.                      

Government Healthcare Website Quietly Sharing Personal Data

January 21, 2015 9:08 am | by Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar and Jack Gillum - Associated Press | News | Comments

The government's health insurance website is quietly sending consumers' personal data to private companies that specialize in advertising and analyzing Internet data for performance and marketing.           

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Harvard Launches Department of Biomedical Informatics

January 16, 2015 1:49 pm | by Harvard Medical School | News | Comments

The focus of this department is to study the convergence of health and data.                               

Depression, Behavioral Changes May Precede Memory Loss in Alzheimer's

January 16, 2015 10:09 am | by Washington University in St. Louis | News | Comments

Depression and behavioral changes may occur before memory declines in people who will go on to develop Alzheimer’s disease, according to new research at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis.                                  

FDA Approves First-of-Kind Device to Treat Obesity

January 15, 2015 9:51 am | by FDA | News | Comments

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved the Maestro Rechargeable System for certain obese adults, the first weight loss treatment device that targets the nerve pathway between the brain and the stomach that controls feelings of hunger and fullness.  

3-D Facial Imaging May Aid in Early Detection of Autism

January 14, 2015 4:18 pm | by University of Missouri | News | Comments

Early detection of autism in children is the key for treatments to be most effective and produce the best outcomes.                        

Blocking Hormone Could Eliminate Stress Induced Infertility

January 13, 2015 3:41 pm | by UC Berkeley | News | Comments

Scientists have discovered that chronic stress activates a hormone that reduces fertility long after the stress has ended, and that blocking this hormone returns female reproductive behavior to normal.          

Mechanism Insights Into SMA Suggest New Treatment Paths

January 13, 2015 10:07 am | by CSHL | News | Comments

A team of researchers from Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory (CSHL) sheds new light on the underlying pathology of spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), a rare but devastating disease that causes muscle weakness and paralysis and is the leading genetic cause of infant deaths. The newly obtained insights may prove valuable as scientists currently work to define optimal treatment strategies for patients.

Sounding Out Speech

January 12, 2015 8:42 am | by Peter Reuell. Harvard Gazette | News | Comments

Among the thorniest challenges in the study of speech perception, the invariance problem was first identified in the 1950s, when scientists began using instruments to analyze spoken language.            

Study Links Common Human Protein to Adverse Parasitic Worm Infections

January 8, 2015 5:10 pm | by University of Calilfornia, Riverside | News | Comments

Worm infections represent a major global public health problem, leading to a variety of debilitating diseases and conditions, such as anemia, elephantiasis, growth retardation and dysentery. Several drugs are available to treat worm infections, but reinfection is high especially in developing countries.

The Best Offense Against Bacteria is a Good Defense

January 7, 2015 4:17 pm | by Ohio State University | News | Comments

A small protein active in the human immune response can disable bacterial toxins by exploiting a property that makes the toxins effective.                     

Method Developed to Define Stages of Stem Cell Reprogramming

January 7, 2015 3:42 pm | by UCLA | News | Comments

This study provides scientists with a critical new understanding of stem cell development and its role in disease.                         

New Diet Pill Tricks the Body into Losing Weight

January 5, 2015 4:05 pm | by Salk Institute for Biological Studies | News | Comments

Researchers have developed an entirely new type of pill that tricks the body into thinking it has consumed calories, causing it to burn fat.                    

A Fascinating Year in Breast Cancer Advances

January 5, 2015 8:50 am | by Cynthia Fox, Science Writer | Articles | Comments

Some of the most important advances in breast cancer this year were related to all kinds of heterogeneity: within tumors, between tumors in a single patient, and between tumors in early and later stages, according to oncologists speaking at conferences, and contacted by Bioscience Technology.

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