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The Lead

How the Immune System Promotes Digestive Health

January 22, 2015 4:11 pm | by University of Utah | News | Comments

It involves fostering a community of "good" gut bacteria.                                  

Estrogen-Producing Neurons Influence Aggression in Both Sexes

January 22, 2015 4:00 pm | by Pete Farley, UCSF | News | Comments

A miniscule cluster of estrogen-producing nerve cells in the mouse brain exerts highly specific...

The Ups and Downs of the Seemingly Idle Brain

January 21, 2015 9:16 am | by Brown University | News | Comments

A new study probed deep into this somewhat mysterious cycle in mice, to learn more about how the...

Government Healthcare Website Quietly Sharing Personal Data

January 21, 2015 9:08 am | by Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar and Jack Gillum - Associated Press | News | Comments

The government's health insurance website is quietly sending consumers' personal data to private...

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Harvard Launches Department of Biomedical Informatics

January 16, 2015 1:49 pm | by Harvard Medical School | News | Comments

The focus of this department is to study the convergence of health and data.                               

Depression, Behavioral Changes May Precede Memory Loss in Alzheimer's

January 16, 2015 10:09 am | by Washington University in St. Louis | News | Comments

Depression and behavioral changes may occur before memory declines in people who will go on to develop Alzheimer’s disease, according to new research at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis.                                  

FDA Approves First-of-Kind Device to Treat Obesity

January 15, 2015 9:51 am | by FDA | News | Comments

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved the Maestro Rechargeable System for certain obese adults, the first weight loss treatment device that targets the nerve pathway between the brain and the stomach that controls feelings of hunger and fullness.  

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3-D Facial Imaging May Aid in Early Detection of Autism

January 14, 2015 4:18 pm | by University of Missouri | News | Comments

Early detection of autism in children is the key for treatments to be most effective and produce the best outcomes.                        

Blocking Hormone Could Eliminate Stress Induced Infertility

January 13, 2015 3:41 pm | by UC Berkeley | News | Comments

Scientists have discovered that chronic stress activates a hormone that reduces fertility long after the stress has ended, and that blocking this hormone returns female reproductive behavior to normal.          

Mechanism Insights Into SMA Suggest New Treatment Paths

January 13, 2015 10:07 am | by CSHL | News | Comments

A team of researchers from Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory (CSHL) sheds new light on the underlying pathology of spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), a rare but devastating disease that causes muscle weakness and paralysis and is the leading genetic cause of infant deaths. The newly obtained insights may prove valuable as scientists currently work to define optimal treatment strategies for patients.

Sounding Out Speech

January 12, 2015 8:42 am | by Peter Reuell. Harvard Gazette | News | Comments

Among the thorniest challenges in the study of speech perception, the invariance problem was first identified in the 1950s, when scientists began using instruments to analyze spoken language.            

Study Links Common Human Protein to Adverse Parasitic Worm Infections

January 8, 2015 5:10 pm | by University of Calilfornia, Riverside | News | Comments

Worm infections represent a major global public health problem, leading to a variety of debilitating diseases and conditions, such as anemia, elephantiasis, growth retardation and dysentery. Several drugs are available to treat worm infections, but reinfection is high especially in developing countries.

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The Best Offense Against Bacteria is a Good Defense

January 7, 2015 4:17 pm | by Ohio State University | News | Comments

A small protein active in the human immune response can disable bacterial toxins by exploiting a property that makes the toxins effective.                     

Method Developed to Define Stages of Stem Cell Reprogramming

January 7, 2015 3:42 pm | by UCLA | News | Comments

This study provides scientists with a critical new understanding of stem cell development and its role in disease.                         

New Diet Pill Tricks the Body into Losing Weight

January 5, 2015 4:05 pm | by Salk Institute for Biological Studies | News | Comments

Researchers have developed an entirely new type of pill that tricks the body into thinking it has consumed calories, causing it to burn fat.                    

A Fascinating Year in Breast Cancer Advances

January 5, 2015 8:50 am | by Cynthia Fox, Science Writer | Articles | Comments

Some of the most important advances in breast cancer this year were related to all kinds of heterogeneity: within tumors, between tumors in a single patient, and between tumors in early and later stages, according to oncologists speaking at conferences, and contacted by Bioscience Technology.

'Blood Pressure Cuff' for Dementia Reliable and Valid

December 29, 2014 4:24 pm | by Indiana University | News | Comments

A new study finds that a blood pressure cuff for dementia is user-friendly, reliable and valid.                              

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Text Message Reminders Increase Second Dose of Flu Vaccine in Children

December 29, 2014 4:18 pm | by Columbia University | News | Comments

Researchers studied the impact of text message reminders for the second dose of influenza vaccine required for many young children to protect them against the virus.                

Whole-Genome Sequencing Can Identify Cancer-Related Mutations

December 24, 2014 9:35 am | News | Comments

UT Southwestern Medical Center cancer researchers have demonstrated that whole-genome sequencing can be used to identify patients' risk for hereditary cancer, which can potentially lead to improvements in cancer prevention, diagnosis, and care.

Scientists Open New Frontier of Vast Chemical 'Space'

December 17, 2014 4:20 pm | News | Comments

Chemists at The Scripps Research Institute have invented a powerful method for joining complex organic molecules that is extraordinarily robust.                    

Napster Co-Founder To Invest in Allergy Research

December 17, 2014 10:13 am | by Olga R. Rodriguez - Associated Press | News | Comments

Napster co-founder Sean Parker missed most of his final year in high school and has ended up in the emergency room countless of times because of his deadly allergy to nuts, shellfish and other foods.                            

Non-Gluten Proteins are Targets of Immune Response to Wheat in Celiac Disease

December 16, 2014 11:40 am | News | Comments

Researchers found that the immune system of patients with celiac disease react to specific types of non-gluten protein in wheat.                      

Signaling Mechanism Could be Target for Survival, Growth of Tumor Cells

December 15, 2014 11:54 am | by UT Southwestern | News | Comments

UT Southwestern Medical Center neurology researchers have identified an important cell signaling mechanism that plays an important role in brain cancer and may provide a new therapeutic target.                                 

Brain Stimulation May Hold Key to Anxiety Treatment

December 15, 2014 11:27 am | News | Comments

Researchers at The University of Western Australia have found that that brain stimulation may help retrain unhelpful cognitive habits associated with anxiety and depression.                

Next Steps Uncertain for Women with Dense Breasts

December 9, 2014 8:30 am | by Lauran Neergaard - AP Medical Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

More women are learning their breasts are so dense that it's more difficult for mammograms to spot cancer. But new research suggests automatically giving them an extra test isn't necessarily the solution.             

Learning a Second Language: First-Rate Exercise for the Brain

December 3, 2014 8:30 am | by Bioscience Technology Staff | Articles | Comments

The brain is so exquisitely sensitive to language that it only takes six weeks of learning Chinese for the neurons of English speakers to rewire. And those whose brains are fully bilingual are more facile at learning generally.       

Current Mutation Detection Process Misses People at High Risk of Cancer

December 1, 2014 1:19 pm | News | Comments

New research on the BRCA gene mutation in the Jewish population shows that the current process of identifying people- which relies on assessing someone’s family history- misses half the people who have the mutation and are at risk of developing cancer.

Imaging Shows Connection Breakdown in Early Alzheimer’s Brains

December 1, 2014 1:05 pm | News | Comments

Changes in brain connections visible on MRI could represent an imaging biomarker of Alzheimer's disease, according to a new study. For the new study, researchers looked at the brain's structural connectome, a map of white matter tracts that carry signals between different areas of the brain.

Reading Harry Potter Gives Clues to Brain Activity

December 1, 2014 8:30 am | by Lauran Neergaard - AP Medical Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

Harry Potter swoops around on his broom, faces the bully Malfoy and later runs into a three-headed dog. For scientists studying brain activity while reading, it's the perfect excerpt from the young wizard's many adventures to give their subjects. 

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