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Babies’ Hearts May Beat Path to Heart Attack Treatments

October 17, 2014 11:50 am | Videos | Comments

The seemingly miraculous power of babies’ hearts to repair themselves after being injured has spurred a research team to investigate if this ability can be harnessed for new heart attack treatments.               

Repair Process Suggests Potential Heart Attack Treatment Strategy

October 16, 2014 2:47 pm | News | Comments

Researchers have discovered that some scar-forming cells in the heart, known as...

Weight Gain Study Suggests Polyunsaturated Oil Healthier Option

October 16, 2014 2:33 pm | News | Comments

Short-term modest weight gains in healthy, normal weight young adults was associated with...

Explaining More About Airway Closure During Asthma Attacks

October 16, 2014 2:28 pm | News | Comments

In acute asthma, various triggers, including viral illnesses and aeroallergens, can cause...

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Reversing Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis

October 14, 2014 2:42 pm | by Cynthia Fox, Science Writer | Articles | Comments

Lethal fibrosis in lungs of mice with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) can be reversed, say researchers. No drug on the market can do this. But the crew pulled it off, in mice, by temporarily restoring (a mimic of) one of the body’s own anti-fibrosis agents, sharply reduced in IPF: microRNA-29.

Exercise Can Improve Memory in People Over 60

October 14, 2014 12:53 pm | News | Comments

A new study shows that physical activity can improve memory performance in older people through increasing volume and blood flow in an area of the brain called hippocampus.                       

Stress May be Harder on Women’s Hearts than Men’s

October 14, 2014 12:20 pm | News | Comments

Researchers have known for decades that stress contributes to heart disease. But a new analysis shows mental stress may tax women’s hearts more than men’s.                           

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Making Old Lungs Look New Again

October 2, 2014 2:21 pm | News | Comments

New research shows that the lungs become more inflammatory with age and that ibuprofen can lower that inflammation. In fact, immune cells from old mouse lungs fought tuberculosis bacteria as effectively as cells from young mice after lung inflammation was reduced by ibuprofen.

Gene Interacts With Stress, Leads to Heart Disease

October 1, 2014 3:33 pm | News | Comments

A new genetic finding suggests that some people who are prone to hostility, anxiety and depression might also be hard-wired to gain weight when exposed to chronic stress, leading to diabetes and heart disease.           

Stem Cells Help Study How Mutation Affects Heart Health

September 26, 2014 8:30 am | News | Comments

Over 500 million people worldwide carry a genetic mutation that disables a common metabolic protein called ALDH2. The mutation, which predominantly occurs in people of East Asian descent, leads to an increased risk of heart disease and poorer outcomes after a heart attack. Now, have learned for the first time specifically how the mutation affects heart health.

Lost Protein Could Prevent Hardening of the Arteries

September 23, 2014 2:23 pm | News | Comments

Researchers have found that when the protein matrix metalloproteinase-14 (MMP-14) is reduced or lost, white blood cells, known as macrophages, become good and could prevent hardening of the arteries, rupture and sudden death.        

Nanotubes Help Healing Hearts Keep the Beat

September 23, 2014 1:59 pm | Videos | Comments

Carbon nanotubes serve as bridges that allow electrical signals to pass unhindered through new pediatric heart-defect patches invented at Rice University and Texas Children’s Hospital.                    

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Airway Muscle-on-a-chip Mimics Asthma

September 23, 2014 1:46 pm | News | Comments

Hope for healthier airways may be on the horizon thanks to a human airway muscle-on-a-chip that could be used to test new drugs because it accurately mimics the way smooth muscle contracts in the human airway, under normal circumstances and when exposed to asthma triggers.

Protein May Lower Blood Pressure

September 19, 2014 8:30 am | by Benjamin Plackett, Contributor, Inside Science News | News | Comments

A new study has shown that people who eat more protein- whether from plant or animal sources- tend to have a lower risk of hypertension, also known as high blood pressure.                       

Study Links Physical Activity to White-matter Integrity

September 17, 2014 2:00 pm | News | Comments

Like everything else in the body, the white-matter fibers that allow communication between brain regions also decline with age. In a new study, researchers found a strong association between the structural integrity of these white-matter tracts and an older person’s level of daily activity.

Smoking, Schizophrenia Linked by Altered Nicotine Signals

September 16, 2014 1:25 pm | News | Comments

A new study shows how schizophrenia is associated with increased rates and intensity of tobacco smoking by showing that the level of nicotine receptors in the brain was lower in schizophrenia patients than in a matched healthy group.     

Using Antibiotics to Help Heart Problems

September 11, 2014 12:17 pm | News | Comments

A research team is looking at whether an antibiotic has the potential to prevent or treat irregular heartbeats brought on by other medicines, thanks to a grant from national charity in the UK.                 

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Method Turns Skin Cells Into Immune-fighting White Blood Cells

September 11, 2014 12:12 pm | News | Comments

For the first time, scientists have turned human skin cells into transplantable white blood cells, soldiers of the immune system that fight infections and invaders.                         

BST This Week #14: IPF Cases Linked to Asbestos Exposure

September 10, 2014 12:00 pm | Videos | Comments

On this episode of Bioscience Technology This Week, Christina Jakubowski discusses a new study that shows a link between idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis cases and asbestos exposure. Our second story showcases how immune cells use two critical receptors to clear dead cells from the body.

Study Sheds Light on Asthma, Respiratory Viruses

September 9, 2014 3:32 pm | News | Comments

People with asthma often have a hard time dealing with respiratory viruses such as the flu or the common cold, and researchers have struggled to explain why. Now, the answer is becoming clearer.                

Oxidized LDL Might Actually be 'Good Guy'

September 5, 2014 3:24 pm | News | Comments

A team of investigators has made a thought-provoking discovery about a type of cholesterol previously believed to be a "bad guy" in the development of heart disease and other conditions.                    

Banked Blood Grows Stiffer With Age

September 5, 2014 3:15 pm | News | Comments

It may look like fresh blood and flow like fresh blood, but the longer blood is stored, the less it can carry oxygen into the tiny microcapillaries of the body, says a new study.                     

More Than 8 in 10 U.S. Homes Forbid Smoking

September 4, 2014 1:25 pm | by Mike Stobbe - AP Medical Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

Smoking is banned in more than eight out of 10 U.S. homes— nearly twice as many as two decades ago, according to a new government study. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention found smoking is even forbidden in nearly half of homes where an adult smoker resides.

Could a Protein be Linked to Heart Attacks?

September 3, 2014 2:42 pm | News | Comments

A team of researchers has uncovered an intriguing link between heart attacks and a protein that is of great interest to drug companies for its impact on cholesterol.                         

DIY Blood Pressure Care Can Beat MDs

August 27, 2014 8:24 am | by Lindsey Tanner - AP Medical Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

"Do-it-yourself" blood pressure measurements and medicine changes work better than usual doctor-office care in some patients, a study of older adults in England found.                        

Exercise Can Impact Breast Cancer Risk

August 25, 2014 3:38 pm | by Cynthia Fox | Articles | Comments

A large new study found that when post-menopausal women stop physical activity, their odds of developing breast cancer rise. But, the study also found that breast cancer risk drops surprisingly rapidly after exercise starts.                  

E-cigarettes Might Help Smokers Quit, AHA Says

August 25, 2014 1:22 am | by Marilynn Marchione - AP Chief Medical Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

The American Heart Association's first policy statement on electronic cigarettes backs them as a last resort to help smokers quit. The American Cancer Society has no formal policy but quietly took a similar stance in May.          

Physical Fitness Makes Kids' Brains Bigger

August 19, 2014 1:41 pm | News | Comments

A new study of 9- and 10-year-olds finds that those who are more aerobically fit have more fibrous and compact white-matter tracts in the brain than their peers who are less fit.                     

Critical Wound-healing Proteins Identified

August 19, 2014 11:13 am | News | Comments

Mice missing two important proteins of the vascular system develop normally and appear healthy in adulthood, as long as they don’t become injured. If they do, their wounds don’t heal properly, a new study shows.           

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