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Eating Probiotics Regularly May Improve Your Blood Pressure

July 22, 2014 1:36 pm | News | Comments

Eating probiotics regularly may modestly improve your blood pressure, according to new research. Probiotics are live microorganisms (naturally occurring bacteria in the gut) thought to have beneficial effects; common sources are yogurt or dietary supplements.

Gene Variation May Modify Cardiovascular Benefit of Aspirin

July 18, 2014 1:01 pm | News | Comments

A daily low-dose aspirin is widely prescribed for the prevention of cardiovascular disease. Now...

Drinking Alcohol Provides No Heart Health Benefit

July 11, 2014 1:37 pm | News | Comments

Reducing the amount of alcoholic beverages consumed, even for light-to-moderate drinkers, may...

Bioscience Technology This Week #1: Tick Bites Pack Double Punch

July 9, 2014 11:24 am | Videos | Comments

On this episode of Bioscience Technology This Week, Editor-in-Chief Rob Fee reports on the...

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High Cholesterol Linked to Breast Cancer Risk

July 7, 2014 11:57 am | News | Comments

An association between high blood cholesterol and breast cancer has been found in a study of more than 1 million patients over a 14-year time period in the UK.                          

Four in Ten Pancreatic Cancers Could be Prevented by Lifestyle Changes

July 1, 2014 11:49 am | News | Comments

Almost 40 percent of pancreatic cancers– one of the deadliest forms of cancer– could be avoided in the UK through maintaining a healthy weight and not smoking, according to new research.                   

Running, Combined with Visual Stimuli, Restores Brain Function

June 27, 2014 1:04 pm | News | Comments

In a new study, scientists explain that running, when accompanied by visual stimuli, restored brain function to normal levels in mice that had been deprived of visual experience in early life.                 

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Too Much TV Time May Up Early Death Risk

June 26, 2014 11:05 am | News | Comments

Adults who watch TV for three hours or more each day may double their risk of premature death compared to those who watch less, according to new research.                           

Almonds Can Reduce Heart Disease Risk

June 25, 2014 1:06 pm | News | Comments

Scientists have found that eating almonds in your diet can reduce the risk of heart disease by keeping blood vessels healthy and significantly increasing the amount of antioxidants in the blood stream.              

Ferroelectric Switching Seen in Biological Tissues

June 24, 2014 12:57 pm | News | Comments

Researchers have shown that a favorable electrical property is present in a type of protein found in organs that repeatedly stretch and retract, such as the lungs, heart and arteries. These findings are the first that clearly track this phenomenon, called ferroelectricity, occurring at the molecular level in biological tissues.

Broken Gene Found to Protect Against Heart Disease

June 19, 2014 2:41 pm | News | Comments

By scouring the DNA of thousands of patients, researchers have discovered four rare gene mutations that not only lower the levels of triglycerides, a type of fat in the blood, but also significantly reduce a person’s risk of coronary heart disease—dropping it by 40 percent. The mutations all cripple the same gene, called APOC3, suggesting a powerful strategy in developing new drugs against heart disease.

Blood Test Identifies Heart-transplant Rejection Earlier than Biopsy Can

June 19, 2014 9:56 am | News | Comments

Stanford University researchers have devised a noninvasive way to detect heart-transplant rejection weeks or months earlier than previously possible. The test, which relies on the detection of increasing amounts of the donor’s DNA in the blood of the recipient, does not require the removal of any heart tissue.

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Heart Rate Variability May Predict Risk of Disease in Premature Infants

June 13, 2014 1:34 pm | News | Comments

Measuring variability of heart rate may identify premature infants at risk of developing necrotizing enterocolitis, a serious inflammatory condition that can lead to death, according to Penn State College of Medicine researchers. Necrotizing enterocolitis, or NEC, may lead to destruction of the intestinal wall and vital organ failure. It affects 6 to 10 percent of premature infants within the first two weeks of life.

Zebrafish Yield Insights into Treating Heart Disease

June 12, 2014 1:53 pm | News | Comments

Using a zebrafish model, investigators have identified a drug compound that appears to reverse arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy (ACM), a hereditary disease and leading cause of sudden death in young people.             

‘Tomato Pill’ Improves Blood Vessel Function

June 10, 2014 12:58 pm | News | Comments

A daily supplement of an extract found in tomatoes may improve the function of blood vessels in patients with cardiovascular disease, according to new research.                          

Newborns Exposed to Allergens May Have Lower Allergy, Asthma Risk

June 9, 2014 12:57 pm | News | Comments

Infants exposed to rodent and pet dander, roach allergens and a wide variety of household bacteria in the first year of life appear less likely to suffer from allergies, wheezing and asthma, according to a new study.          

Review Summarizes Research on Marijuana’s Negative Health Effects

June 6, 2014 1:52 pm | News | Comments

The current state of science on the adverse health effects of marijuana use links the drug to several significant adverse effects including addiction, a new review reports.                       

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Breaking News: Air Pollution Linked to Autism, Schizophrenia

June 5, 2014 3:00 pm | News | Comments

A new study shows how exposure to air pollution early in life produces harmful changes in the brains of mice, including an enlargement of part of the brain that is seen in humans who have autism and schizophrenia.           

Heart-shocking ‘Shirt’ Could Save Lives

June 3, 2014 1:46 pm | News | Comments

Biomedical engineering students have designed a lightweight, easy-to-conceal shirt-like garment to deliver life-saving shocks to patients experiencing serious heart problems. The students say their design improves upon a wearable defibrillator system that is already in use.

Young Women Fare Worse than Young Men After Heart Attack

June 3, 2014 1:02 pm | News | Comments

Women age 55 or younger may fare worse than their male counterparts after having a heart attack, according to new research presented at the American Heart Association’s Quality of Care and Outcomes Research Scientific Sessions 2014. Researchers studied records and interviews of 3,501 people (67 percent women) who had heart attacks in the United States and Spain in 2008-12.

Cystic Fibrosis, Diabetes Link Explained

June 2, 2014 12:15 pm | News | Comments

Many people with cystic fibrosis develop diabetes. The reasons for this have been largely unknown, but now researchers have identified a molecular mechanism that contributes to the raised diabetes risk.              

Using a Baby’s Cord Blood to Repair its Brain

May 28, 2014 2:01 pm | News | Comments

Lack of blood flow and oxygen delivery to a baby during labor and delivery can result in a condition known as hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE), which is treated by whole body cooling. Now, researchers report on the feasibility of using a baby’s own cord blood cells to aid the injured brain in repairing itself.

Coating Stents with Vitamin C Could Reduce Clotting Risks

May 28, 2014 1:51 pm | News | Comments

Every year, more than 1 million people in the U.S. who have suffered heart attacks or chest pain from blocked arteries have little mesh tubes called stents inserted into their blood vessels to prop them open. The procedure has saved many lives, but it still has potentially deadly downsides. Now scientists are reporting that coating stents with vitamin C could lower the implants’ risks even further.

Sudden Cardiac Death Risk Tied to Protein Overproduction

May 28, 2014 12:57 pm | News | Comments

A genetic variant linked to sudden cardiac death leads to protein overproduction in heart cells, scientists report. The discovery adds to scientific understanding of the causes of sudden cardiac death and of possible ways to prevent it.    

Breaking News: High Cholesterol Linked to Lower Fertility

May 20, 2014 1:00 pm | News | Comments

High cholesterol levels may impair fertility in couples trying to achieve a pregnancy, according to a new study. Couples in which each partner had a high cholesterol level took the longest time to reach pregnancy, the study showed.    

Racing the Clock to Help Young Patients with Old Hearts

May 20, 2014 11:27 am | News | Comments

Children with progeria, a rare disorder that causes premature aging, die in their teens of ailments that are common in octogenarians: heart failure and stroke. Kan Cao, a University of Maryland assistant professor of cell biology and molecular genetics, urgently wants to help find a cure. Cao and her colleagues have taken a big step in that direction, showing that a toxic protein destroys muscle cells inside the patients’ arteries.

Study Finds Limited Benefit for Vitamin D in Asthma Treatment

May 19, 2014 1:46 pm | News | Comments

Adding vitamin D to asthma treatment to improve breathing only appears to benefit patients who achieve sufficient levels of the supplement in the blood. Overall, the ability to control asthma did not differ between a study group that received vitamin D supplements and a group that received placebo, according to new research.

Red Wine May Not Prevent Heart Disease, Prolong Life

May 16, 2014 10:39 am | News | Comments

There is bad news for those who believe drinking red wine is protecting their hearts and extending their lives. A study found that a plant compound in grapes—resveratrol—may not provide such health benefits. The nine-year study found resveratrol had no significant effect on longevity, inflammation, cardiovascular disease, or cancer.

Hazardous Flame Retardants Found in Child Care Settings

May 15, 2014 11:17 am | News | Comments

A new study of preschools and day care centers finds that flame retardants are prevalent indoors, potentially exposing young children to chemicals known to be hazardous.                       

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