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Previously Unknown Effect of Vitamin A Identified

February 24, 2015 12:42 pm | by Lund University | News | Comments

Researchers have identified a previously unknown effect of vitamin A in human embryonic development.                           

Obesity Genes Identified by Worldwide Research Team

February 24, 2015 9:43 am | by Queensland University of Technology | News | Comments

A massive worldwide analysis of genetic data from almost 340,000 people around the world has...

Challenges for Doctors Using Fitness Trackers, Apps

February 20, 2015 4:26 pm | by Anick Jesdanun, AP Tech Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

More hospitals and doctors are starting to use data from fitness trackers and health apps to...

Keeping Atherosclerosis in Check with Novel Targeted Nanomedicines

February 19, 2015 11:42 am | by Columbia University | News | Comments

Nanometer-sized “drones” that deliver a special type of healing molecule to fat deposits in...

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How Right Hemisphere Assists Left When Damaged in Stroke

February 18, 2015 12:46 pm | by George Washington Univ. | News | Comments

A new study conducted by a researcher at the George Washington University suggests that the right hemisphere of the brain may be able to assist a damaged left hemisphere in protecting visual attention after a stroke.

Is Strenuous Running Really as Bad for Health as Lounging?

February 18, 2015 11:32 am | by Cynthia Fox, Science Writer | News | Comments

Running hard may be as bad for your longevity as being a couch potato, says a recent study—one that should be taken with a grain of salt (hold the butter), say some critics. The study, in a recent Journal of the American College of Cardiology, examined 5,048 healthy people enrolled in the Copenhagen City Heart Study. For 12 years, 1,098 healthy joggers and 413 healthy, but sedentary non-joggers were followed.

Anti-Inflammatory Mechanism of Dieting, Fasting Revealed

February 17, 2015 4:22 pm | by Karen N. Peart, Yale News | News | Comments

Researchers have found that a compound produced by the body when dieting or fasting can block a part of the immune system involved in several inflammatory disorders such as type 2 diabetes, atherosclerosis, and Alzheimer’s disease.     

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Protein Clue to Sudden Cardiac Death

February 17, 2015 3:56 pm | by Oxford University | News | Comments

A protein has been shown to have a surprising role in regulating the 'glue' that holds heart cells together, a finding that may explain how a gene defect could cause sudden cardiac death.            

Study Ties More Deaths, Types of Disease, to Smoking

February 12, 2015 2:06 pm | by Marilynn Marchione, Associated Press | News | Comments

Breast cancer, prostate cancer, and even routine infections. A new report ties these and other maladies to smoking and said an additional 60,000 to 120,000 deaths each year in the United States are probably due to tobacco use.      

Brain Stents Show Big Promise for Certain Stroke Patients

February 12, 2015 9:53 am | by Associated Press | News | Comments

Stroke experts are reporting a major advance: Stents similar to the ones used to open clogged heart arteries also can be used to clear a blood clot in the brain, greatly lowering the risk a patient will end up disabled.

Isolated Systolic Hypertension Indicates Heart Disease Risk for Younger Adults

February 12, 2015 9:32 am | News | Comments

High systolic blood pressure – the top number in a blood pressure reading – has long been considered an indicator of cardiovascular disease risk for adults over 50. But now a new Northwestern Medicine study suggests that it’s also important for younger adults.

Revolution in Imaging Tech Brings Heart Failure Molecule Into View

February 4, 2015 10:32 am | by Columbia University | News | Comments

Using the same technology that made smartphone cameras possible, scientists at Columbia University Medical Center are capturing images of individual molecules at a level of detail never before possible—including images of a molecule implicated in heart disease and muscle diseases.

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Beethoven’s Arrhythmias Likely Inspired Some of His Masterpieces

February 3, 2015 1:54 pm | by Cynthia Fox, Science Writer | Articles | Comments

"Washington University cardiologist Zachary Goldberger once made music out of heartbeats. Now, with a Beethoven scholar and a medical historian, he has discovered that three musical compositions that Beethoven created while stressed are arrhythmic in a way mirroring the composer's own probable heart arrhythmias."

Two Genetic Mutations May Interact to Lower Heart Attack Risk

February 3, 2015 1:24 pm | by Ohio State Univ. | News | Comments

Researchers have determined that two mutations on a single gene can interact in a way that lowers the carrier's risk for a heart attack.  The variants are found in a gene called DBH, which regulates an enzyme involved in the conversion of dopamine to norepinephrine - both of which are important chemical messengers and hormones.

Inside Google's Secretive Life Sciences Lab

January 29, 2015 4:11 pm | by Ryan Bushey, Associate Editor | Videos | Comments

This is the first official look at the life sciences division of Google X.                               

Nanoparticle that Lights Up Artery-Clogging Plaque to be Evaluated

January 28, 2015 10:07 am | by Washington University in St. Louis | News | Comments

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved for evaluating in people a nanoparticle-based imaging agent jointly developed at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis and the University of California, Santa Barbara, in collaboration with Texas A&M University.

Blueberries, Avocados and Cocoa Beans May Keep Cardiologists at Bay

January 20, 2015 5:21 pm | by Bioscience Technology Staff | Articles | Comments

Times have changed. It used to be that an apple a day kept the doctor away. But three recent studies indicate this mantra could be changed to “a blueberry- avocado-cocoa-bean-smoothie a day” keeps the doctor away—if the doctor is a cardiologist.

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New Way to Model Sickle Cell Behavior

January 20, 2015 10:07 am | News | Comments

Patients with sickle cell disease often suffer from painful attacks known as vaso-occlusive crises, during which their sickle-shaped blood cells get stuck in tiny capillaries, depriving tissues of needed oxygen. Blood transfusions can sometimes prevent such attacks, but there are currently no good ways to predict when a vaso-occlusive crisis, which can last for several days, is imminent.

Image Captures How Blood Stem Cells Take Root

January 16, 2015 10:25 am | by Nancy Fliesler, Boston Children's Hospital Communications | News | Comments

A see-through zebrafish and enhanced imaging provide the first direct glimpse of how blood stem cells take root in the body to generate blood.                                          

Teasing Out Genes that Signal Heart Failure Risk

January 16, 2015 10:00 am | by Lauren Neergaard, AP Medical Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

Scientists are unraveling a mystery behind a fairly common disease that leads to heart failure: Why do some people with a key mutated gene fall ill while others stay healthy? Researchers tested more than 5,200 people to tease apart when mutations really are harmful or are just bystanders. 

Genetic Predictor of Serious Brain Stroke Complications Discovered

January 13, 2015 3:50 pm | by University of Florida | News | Comments

Researchers have found a possible predictor for little understood -- but often disabling or even fatal -- stroke complications.                       

Transcription Factor Regulates Repair Pathways in the Lung

January 7, 2015 3:55 pm | by Sarah Plumridge, Northwestern University | News | Comments

Scientists have found that a transcription factor protein may be critical for normal respiratory function.                          

Fructose More Toxic Than Table Sugar in Mice

January 5, 2015 4:34 pm | by University of Utah | News | Comments

The fructose-glucose mixture found in high-fructose corn syrup was more toxic to mice than sucrose or table sugar.                       

Study IDs Risk Factors Linking Low Birthweight to Diabetes

January 5, 2015 4:27 pm | by Brown University | News | Comments

Studies consistently show that people born weighing 6 pounds or less face an increased risk for type 2 diabetes as adults.                       

New Diet Pill Tricks the Body into Losing Weight

January 5, 2015 4:05 pm | by Salk Institute for Biological Studies | News | Comments

Researchers have developed an entirely new type of pill that tricks the body into thinking it has consumed calories, causing it to burn fat.                    

Year Born May Determine Obesity Risk

December 30, 2014 2:52 pm | by Sue McGreevy, Harvard University | News | Comments

Investigators working to unravel the impact of genetics versus environment on traits such as obesity may also need to consider a new factor: when individuals were born.                

10 Up-and-Coming Healthcare Medical Innovations

December 17, 2014 5:32 pm | by Christina Jakubowski, Managing Editor | Articles | Comments

The Cleveland Clinic recently unveiled their annual Top 10 Medical Innovations for 2015– a list that casts an optimistic light on up-and-coming healthcare advances that may reach consumers next year.                                       

Stem Cells Faulty in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

December 17, 2014 4:03 pm | by Stanford University | News | Comments

Like human patients, mice with a form of Duchenne muscular dystrophy undergo progressive muscle degeneration and accumulate connective tissue as they age. Now, researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine have found that the fault may lie at least partly in the stem cells that surround the muscle fibers.

Novel Tool to Study Life-Threatening Arrhythmias: A Genetically Engineered Pig

December 17, 2014 10:18 am | by NYU Langone | News | Comments

Researchers at NYU Langone Medical Center have developed the first large animal model of an inherited arrhythmic syndrome – an advance that will lead to a better understanding of the biologic mechanisms important in normal heart conduction and rhythm. 

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