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The Skin Cancer Selfie

October 29, 2014 1:02 pm | Videos | Comments

If melanoma, the deadliest form of skin cancer, is caught early enough it is almost always curable. Now, a camera capable of taking snapshots of the entire human body and rendering high-resolution images of a patient’s skin may help doctors spot cancer early and save lives.

Genetic Screening Could Reduce Number of Breast Cancer Cases

October 29, 2014 12:37 pm | News | Comments

Should every newborn baby girl be genetically screened for breast-cancer risk? That isn’t...

Google Developing Pill to Detect Cancer

October 29, 2014 10:45 am | by Brandon Bailey - AP Technology Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

Google is working on a cancer-detecting pill in its latest effort to push the boundaries of...

Mathematical Models Can Predict Cellular Processes

October 28, 2014 2:34 pm | News | Comments

A multi-institutional, international team of researchers studied cells found in breast and...

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Patient-relevant Preclinical Models Using Image-guided Small Animal Irradiation

October 28, 2014 11:33 am | by Dr. Rajendra Kumari, Chief Scientific Officer, PRECOS Ltd., a Crown Bioscience Company | Articles | Comments

Radiotherapy is a primary, adjuvant or neoadjuvant treatment for a number of different cancers, such as glioblastoma, breast, lung and prostate. Image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) is used to reduce the amount of radiation delivered to the normal tissue surrounding the targeted tumor. However, in the preclinical setting, the use of IGRT is less common.

Two Stem Cell Beliefs Debunked

October 27, 2014 2:48 pm | News | Comments

Two recent papers may have upturned two common beliefs about adult stem cells: One reported that there appears to be stem cells in the esophagus, while the other reported that a fetal stem cell that can become either a liver cell or an endothelial cell.

New Home Test Shakes Up Colon Cancer Screening

October 27, 2014 8:30 am | by Marilynn Marchione - AP Chief Medical Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

Starting Monday, millions of people who have avoided colon cancer screening can get a new home test that's noninvasive and doesn't require the icky preparation most other methods do. The test is the first to look for cancer-related DNA in stool. 

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Thyroid Cancer Genome Analysis Finds Markers of Aggressive Tumors

October 24, 2014 10:21 am | News | Comments

A new comprehensive analysis of thyroid cancer from The Cancer Genome Atlas Research Network has identified markers of aggressive tumors, which could allow for better targeting of appropriate treatments to individual patients.       

Scientists to Use Tiny Particles to Fight Big Diseases

October 23, 2014 12:49 pm | Videos | Comments

Physicians will tell you: They are not winning the war on ovarian cancer. But researchers have combined medicine and advanced nanotechnological engineering to create a smarter, more targeted therapy that could overcome the most lethal gynecologic cancer.

Fast Modeling of Cancer Mutations

October 23, 2014 12:06 pm | News | Comments

Researchers now developed a new way to model the effects of these genetic mutations in mice. The approach, based on the genome-editing technique known as CRISPR, is much faster than existing strategies, which require genetically engineering mice that carry the cancerous mutations.

Hidden Subpopulation of Melanoma Cells Discovered

October 22, 2014 1:40 pm | News | Comments

Researchers have pinpointed a set of intriguing characteristics in a previously unknown subpopulation of melanoma cancer cells in blood vessels of tumors.                           

Cancer Drug Resistance Has an ‘Off Switch’

October 21, 2014 11:29 am | Videos | Comments

Scientists have uncovered details about how cancer is able to become drug resistant over time, a phenomenon that occurs because cancer cells within the same tumor aren’t identical.                     

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Copper May Be Prostate Cancer’s Fatal Flaw

October 15, 2014 3:13 pm | News | Comments

Researchers have found a way to kill prostate cancer cells by delivering a trove of copper along with a drug that selectively destroys the diseased cells brimming with the mineral, leaving non-cancer cells healthy.           

Early Detection Window When Pancreatic Cancer is in the Family

October 15, 2014 2:59 pm | News | Comments

Pancreatic cancer likely takes between 10 and 20 years to develop, providing the potential for a very “broad window” of intervention if detected early, which may be possible for people who inherit a predisposition, say researchers.     

Cellular 'Snooze Button' Advances Cancer, Biofuel Research

October 14, 2014 11:48 am | News | Comments

The discovery of a cellular snooze button has allowed a team of scientists to potentially improve biofuel production and offer insight on the early stages of cancer.                         

Unusual Skin Cancer Linked to Chronic Metal Allergy

October 10, 2014 10:45 am | News | Comments

In rare cases, patients with allergies to metals develop persistent skin rashes after metal devices are implanted near the skin. New research suggests these patients may be at increased risk of an unusual and aggressive form of skin cancer.   

RNA Molecules in Urine and Tissue Can Detect Prostate Cancer

October 9, 2014 1:40 pm | News | Comments

Researchers have identified a set of RNA molecules that are detectable in tissue samples and urine of prostate cancer patients, but not in normal healthy individuals.                         

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Green Tea-based ‘Missiles’ May Kill Cancer Cells

October 7, 2014 1:17 pm | News | Comments

Green tea has long been known for its anti-oxidant, anti-cancer, anti-aging and anti-microbial properties. Now, a group of researchers has taken the health benefits of green tea to the next level by using one of its ingredients to develop a drug delivery system.

First Pictures of BRCA2 Protein Show How it Repairs DNA

October 6, 2014 12:00 pm | News | Comments

Scientists have taken pictures of the BRCA2 protein for the first time, showing how it works to repair damaged DNA. Mutations in the gene that encodes BRCA2 are well known for raising the risk of breast cancer and other cancers.      

New Visualization Software Uncovers Cancer Subtypes

October 3, 2014 1:42 pm | News | Comments

Much of biomedical research these days is about big data—collecting and analyzing vast, detailed repositories of information about health and disease. These data sets can be treasure troves for investigators, often uncovering genetic mutations that drive a particular kind of cancer, for example.

Discovery Could Prevent Development of Brain Tumors in Children

October 2, 2014 3:10 pm | News | Comments

Scientists discovered a mechanism that promotes the progression of medulloblastoma, the most common brain tumor found in children. The team found that a protein known as Sonic Hedgehog induces DNA damage, which causes the cancer to develop.   

MicroRNA Tied to Colon Cancer Tumor Growth

October 2, 2014 2:57 pm | News | Comments

Researchers have identified microRNAs that may cause colon polyps from turning cancerous. The finding could help physicians provide more specialized, and earlier, treatment before colon cancer develops.               

Study Examines Cancer Risk from First Atom-bomb Test

September 30, 2014 8:30 am | by Susan Montoya Bryan - Associated Press - Associated Press | News | Comments

Researchers from the National Cancer Institute want to know how many past and present cancer cases in New Mexico may be related to the U.S. government's test of the world's first atomic bomb over a remote stretch of desert nearly 70 years ago.  

Biologists Find an Early Sign of Pancreatic Cancer

September 29, 2014 12:39 pm | News | Comments

Years before they show any other signs of disease, pancreatic cancer patients have very high levels of certain amino acids in their bloodstream, according to a new study.                        

How a Single, Genetic Change Causes Retinal Tumors in Children

September 26, 2014 8:30 am | News | Comments

New research has answered the long-standing question of why mutations to the RB1 gene primarily cause tumors of the retina and not of other cell types. The study could reveal new cellular signaling pathways relevant to retinal development, cancer development, and ultimately, the development of novel therapies.

Simple Blood Test a Possible Tool for Early Cancer Diagnosis

September 26, 2014 8:30 am | News | Comments

High levels of calcium in blood, a condition known as hypercalcemia, can be used by GPs as an early indication of certain types of cancer, according to a new study.                          

BST This Week #19: Smelly Grass Fights Off Bugs

September 26, 2014 8:30 am | Videos | Comments

On this episode of Bioscience Technology This Week, Christina Jakubowski reports on a discovery that claims the smell of mown grass is actually an SOS for help in resisting insect attacks. Our second story covers the possibility that modified vitamin D can help fight pancreatic cancer.

Chemists Recruit Anthrax to Deliver Cancer Drugs

September 26, 2014 8:30 am | News | Comments

Bacillus anthracis bacteria have very efficient machinery for injecting toxic proteins into cells, leading to the potentially deadly infection known as anthrax. A team of researchers has now hijacked that delivery system for a different purpose: administering cancer drugs.

Pancreatic Cancer Insight

September 25, 2014 8:30 am | News | Comments

An analysis of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in a mouse model of pancreatic cancer has identified distinct patterns of gene expression in several groups of these cells, including significant differences from the primary tumor that may contribute to their ability to spread.

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