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New Knowledge of Genes Driving Bladder Cancer Points to Targeted Treatments

September 15, 2014 1:08 pm | News | Comments

The story of cancer care seems so simple: find the mutated gene that causes cancer and turn it off or fix it. But rarely does a single gene cause cancer. More often, many genes are altered together to drive the disease. So the challenge becomes sorting out which altered genes are the most to blame in which cancers. A new study takes an important step toward answering this question in bladder cancer.

Study Links Genetic Mutation to Melanoma Progression

September 11, 2014 3:45 pm | News | Comments

Researchers have found that the genetic mutation BRAFV600E , frequently found in...

‘Electronic Skin’ Could Improve Early Breast Cancer Detection

September 10, 2014 11:27 am | News | Comments

For detecting cancer, manual breast exams seem low-tech compared to other methods such as...

Team Finds Ovarian Cancer Oncogene in 'Junk DNA'

September 9, 2014 3:43 pm | News | Comments

Over the years researchers have made tremendous strides in the understanding and treatment of...

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Breaking News: Prediabetes Ups Cancer Risk 15%

September 9, 2014 9:04 am | News | Comments

A meta-analysis comprising 16 studies and 891,426 participants from various regions of the world shows that prediabetes increases the risk of cancer by 15 percent, with differing risks depending on the type of cancer.         

Parkinson's, Cancer Findings Earn Lasker Awards

September 8, 2014 9:23 am | by Malcolm Ritter - AP Science Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

Key discoveries about breast cancer, Parkinson's disease and the body's handling of defective proteins have earned prestigious medical awards for five scientists. The Albert and Mary Lasker Foundation announced the winners Monday.     

Scanner Could Aid Brain Tumor Removal, Reduce Recurrence

September 3, 2014 2:13 pm | News | Comments

Cancerous brain tumors are notorious for growing back despite surgical attempts to remove them. But scientists are currently developing a new way to try to root out malignant cells during surgery so fewer or none get left behind to form new tumors.

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Double Mastectomy Doesn't Boost Survival for Most

September 2, 2014 4:23 pm | by Lindsey Tanner - AP Medical Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

Removing both breasts to treat cancer affecting only one side doesn't boost survival chances for most women, compared with surgery that removes just the tumor, a large study suggests.                    

CTC Clusters More Likely to Cause Metastasis

August 29, 2014 8:30 am | News | Comments

Circulating tumor cell clusters- clumps of from two to 50 tumor cells that break off a primary tumor and are carried through the bloodstream- appear to be much more likely to cause metastasis than are single CTCs, according to a new study.    

Tomato-rich Diet Can Cut Prostate Cancer Risk

August 27, 2014 12:47 pm | News | Comments

Men who eat over 10 portions a week of tomatoes have an 18 per cent lower risk of developing prostate cancer, new research suggests. This is the first study of its kind to develop a prostate cancer "dietary index."         

Cancer Leaves a Common Fingerprint on DNA

August 26, 2014 1:45 pm | News | Comments

Regardless of their stage or type, cancers appear to share a telltale signature of widespread changes to the so-called epigenome, according to a team of researchers. In a study of a broad variety of cancers the investigators say they have found widespread and distinctive changes to chemical marks known as methyl groups attached to DNA.

Sorting Cells with Sound Waves

August 26, 2014 1:29 pm | Videos | Comments

Researchers have devised a new way to separate cells by exposing them to sound waves as they flow through a tiny channel. Their device could be used to detect the extremely rare tumor cells that circulate in cancer patients’ blood.     

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Exercise Can Impact Breast Cancer Risk

August 25, 2014 3:38 pm | by Cynthia Fox | Articles | Comments

A large new study found that when post-menopausal women stop physical activity, their odds of developing breast cancer rise. But, the study also found that breast cancer risk drops surprisingly rapidly after exercise starts.                  

New Approach Helps to Identify Cancer 'Drivers'

August 25, 2014 1:13 pm | News | Comments

Researchers have developed a new integrated approach to pinpoint the genetic “drivers” of cancer, uncovering eight genes that could be viable for targeted breast cancer therapy.                     

Severing Nerves May Shrink Stomach Cancers

August 21, 2014 11:07 am | News | Comments

Research shows that nerves may play a critical role in stomach cancer growth and that blocking nerve signals using surgery or Botox (onabotulinumtoxinA) could be an effective treatment for the disease.              

Gene Predicts Breast Cancer Relapse, Response to Chemo

August 20, 2014 12:29 pm | News | Comments

Scientists have made it easier to predict both breast cancer relapses and responses to chemotherapy, through the identification of a unique gene, a new study shows.                         

Next-Generation Sequencing and the Transformation of Cancer Care

August 18, 2014 3:20 pm | by Darren Lee, Vice President, Marketing & Business Development, Nabsys | White Papers

NGS is revolutionizing the field of genome biology, with much faster data generation, increased accuracy, and a dramatic reduction of sequencing costs. Multiple genomes can now be sequenced in parallel by a single instrument in a matter of days. In the medical field, NGS is already having an impact in genetic screening and holds great potential in oncology, given the genetic aspects of cancerous disease.

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Previous Pulmonary Disease May Up Lung Cancer Risk

August 15, 2014 12:14 pm | News | Comments

Links between a number of common respiratory diseases and an increased risk of developing lung cancer have been found in a large pooled analysis of seven studies involving more than 25,000 individuals.               

Immune Cell Discovery Could Help to Halt Cancer Spread

August 14, 2014 2:09 pm | News | Comments

Melbourne researchers have revealed the critical importance of highly specialized immune cells, called natural killer cells, in killing melanoma cells that have spread to the lungs. These natural killer cells could be harnessed to hunt down and kill cancers that have spread in the body.

Injected Bacteria Shrink Tumors in Rats, Dogs, Humans

August 14, 2014 10:17 am | News | Comments

A modified version of the Clostridium novyi (C. novyi-NT) bacterium can produce a strong and precisely targeted anti-tumor response in rats, dogs and now humans, according to a new report.                 

Bioscience Technology This Week #7: Fruit Flies Unlock the Mysteries of Diabetes

August 13, 2014 2:20 pm | Videos | Comments

In this episode of Bioscience Technology This Week, Rob Fee discusses how studying fruit flies could revolutionize diabetes research. Our second story focuses on how venom could form the basis of a new class of cancerfighting drugs.    

New Analysis Reveals Tumor Weaknesses

August 13, 2014 1:47 pm | News | Comments

Scientists have known for decades that cancer can be caused by genetic mutations, but more recently they have discovered that chemical modifications of a gene can also contribute to cancer. These alterations, known as epigenetic modifications, control whether a gene is turned on or off.

Prostate Cancer Diagnosis Improves with MRI Technology

August 13, 2014 11:03 am | Videos | Comments

Oncologists are melding magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technology with a traditional ultrasound prostate exam to create a three-dimensional map of the prostate that allows physicians to view growths that were previously undetectable.      

Scientists Pinpoint Gene Likely to Promote Childhood Cancers

August 12, 2014 2:28 pm | News | Comments

Researchers at the Children’s Medical Center Research Institute at UT Southwestern (CRI) have identified a gene that contributes to the development of several childhood cancers, in a study conducted with mice designed to model the cancers. If the findings prove to be applicable to humans, the research could lead to new strategies for targeting certain childhood cancers at a molecular level.

Synthetic Molecule Makes Cancer Self-Destruct

August 12, 2014 2:21 pm | News | Comments

Researchers from The University of Texas at Austin and five other institutions have created a molecule that can cause cancer cells to self-destruct by ferrying sodium and chloride ions into the cancer cells. These synthetic ion transporters confirm a two-decades-old hypothesis that could point the way to new anticancer drugs while also benefiting patients with cystic fibrosis.

Hijacking the Brain's Blood Supply: Tumor Discovery Could Aid Treatment

August 12, 2014 1:55 pm | News | Comments

Dangerous brain tumors hijack the brain’s existing blood supply throughout their progression, by growing only within narrow potential spaces between and along the brain’s thousands of small blood vessels, new research shows for the first time.

Editing HPV's Genes to Kill Cervical Cancer Cells

August 11, 2014 2:13 pm | News | Comments

Researchers have hijacked a defense system normally used by bacteria to fend off viral infections and redirected it against the human papillomavirus (HPV), the virus that causes cervical, head and neck, and other cancers.Using the genome editing tool known as CRISPR, the Duke University researchers were able to selectively destroy two viral genes responsible for the growth and survival of cervical carcinoma cells.

Scientists Unlock Key to Blood Vessel Formation

August 11, 2014 2:09 pm | News | Comments

Scientists from the University of Leeds have discovered a gene that plays a vital role in blood vessel formation, research which adds to our knowledge of how early life develops. The discovery could also lead to greater understanding of how to treat cardiovascular diseases and cancer.

Cell Mechanics May Hold Key to How Cancer Spreads and Recurs

August 7, 2014 2:34 pm | News | Comments

Cancer cells that break away from tumors to go looking for a new home may prefer to settle into a soft bed. Some particularly enterprising cancer cells can cause a cancer to spread to other organs, called metastasis, or evade treatment to resurface after a patient is thought to be in remission. A team found that these so-called tumor-repopulating cells may lurk quietly in stiffer cellular environments, but thrive in a softer space.

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