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Scientists ID Source of Most Bladder Cancer Cases

April 21, 2014 2:15 pm | News | Comments

A single type of cell in the lining of the bladder is responsible for most cases of invasive bladder cancer, according to researchers. This study is the first to pinpoint the normal cell type that can give rise to invasive bladder cancers.   

Down Syndrome, Leukemia Link Uncovered

April 21, 2014 11:48 am | News | Comments

Although doctors have long known that people with Down syndrome have a heightened risk of developing acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) during childhood, they haven’t been able to explain why. Now, a team investigators has uncovered a connection between the two conditions.

Chronic Inflammation May Be Linked to Aggressive Prostate Cancer

April 18, 2014 12:11 pm | News | Comments

The presence of chronic inflammation in benign prostate tissue was associated with high-grade, or aggressive, prostate cancer, and this association was found even in those with low prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels, according to a new study.

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Lost Stem Cells Naturally Replaced by Non-stem Cells

April 18, 2014 11:58 am | News | Comments

Researchers have discovered an unexpected phenomenon in the organs that produce sperm in fruit flies: when a certain kind of stem cell is killed off experimentally, another group of non-stem cells can come out of retirement to replace them.   

Small Molecules Making Big News in Cancer Treatment

April 17, 2014 2:24 pm | by Neil Canavan | Articles | Comments

Size doesn’t matter as long as long as you can get the job done. That said, one may be forgiven the impression that larger molecules—antibodies and related constructs, or T cells themselves being used in immunotherapies—were preferentially presented at American Association of Cancer Research annual conference

Some Immune Cells Defend Only One Organ

April 17, 2014 1:52 pm | News | Comments

Scientists have uncovered a new way the immune system may fight cancers and viral infections. The finding could aid efforts to use immune cells to treat illness. The research, in mice, suggests that some organs have the immunological equivalent of “neighborhood police” – specialized squads of defenders that patrol only one area, a single organ, instead of an entire city, the body.

Immunotherapies Rock the House

April 16, 2014 2:05 pm | by Neil Canavan | Articles | Comments

The potential of immunotherapies drew large interest at this year's American Association for Cancer Research annual meeting. And the new data are particularly striking for their clinical results—reporting once uncommon at this basic research meeting.

DNA Looping Damage Tied to HPV Cancer

April 16, 2014 1:26 pm | News | Comments

It’s long been known that certain strains of human papillomavirus (HPV) cause cancer. Now, researchers have determined a new way that HPV might spark cancer development– by disrupting the human DNA sequence with repeating loops when the virus is inserted into host-cell DNA as it replicates.

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Targeting Cancer with a Triple Threat

April 15, 2014 11:55 am | News | Comments

Delivering chemotherapy drugs in nanoparticle form could help reduce side effects by targeting the drugs directly to the tumors. In recent years, scientists have developed nanoparticles that deliver one or two chemotherapy drugs, but it has been difficult to design particles that can carry any more than that in a precise ratio. Now chemists have devised a new way to build such nanoparticles.

Gene Panel Effectively Screens Dozens of Genes for Cancer-associated Mutations

April 15, 2014 11:45 am | News | Comments

As many as 10 percent of women with a personal or family history of breast or ovarian cancer have at least one genetic mutation that, if known, would prompt their doctors to recommend changes in their care, according to a new study by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine.

Drawing a Ring Around Antiviral Immunity

April 15, 2014 11:37 am | News | Comments

If you follow cancer biology, then you’ve probably heard of ubiquitin before. In a recent paper researchers provided a structural rationale for how ubiquitin helps RIG-I do its job— and how that might help keep the immune system from getting out of hand.

MicroRNA Could be Key Target for Bowel Cancer Treatment

April 14, 2014 2:42 pm | News | Comments

A tiny genetic molecule known as a microRNA plays a central role in bowel cancer and could be key to developing new treatments for the disease, a new study concludes. Scientists found that the molecule, called microRNA 135b, is a vital ‘worker’ employed by several important cancer genes to drive the growth of bowel cancers.

Virus-fighting Genes Linked to Mutations in Cancer

April 14, 2014 2:15 pm | News | Comments

Researchers have found a major piece of genetic evidence that confirms the role of a group of virus-fighting genes in cancer development. The APOBEC family of genes control enzymes that are believed to have evolved in humans to fight off viral infections. Scientists have speculated that these enzymes are responsible for a very distinct signature of mutations that is present in approximately half of all cancer types.

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Tumor-suppressor Connects with Histone Protein to Hinder Gene Expression

April 11, 2014 1:06 pm | News | Comments

A tumor-suppressing protein acts as a dimmer switch to dial down gene expression.  It does this by reading a chemical message attached to another protein that’s tightly intertwined with DNA, a team led by scientists at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center reports. The findings provide evidence in support of the “histone code" hypothesis.

Identified Epigenetic Factors Associated with an Increased Risk of Developing Cancer

April 10, 2014 1:51 pm | News | Comments

In the last decade, hundreds of studies have been conducted looking for polymorphisms associated with a greater propensity to suffer some of the most frequent human tumors. These tests, called GWAS, have found a common problem: many times the tiny genetic change observed appears to have no activity or function to explain because it is associated with more cancer.

Blocking DNA Repair Mechanisms Could Improve Radiation Therapy for Brain Cancer

April 9, 2014 2:38 pm | News | Comments

UT Southwestern Medical Center researchers have demonstrated in both cancer cell lines and in mice that blocking critical DNA repair mechanisms could improve the effectiveness of radiation therapy for highly fatal brain tumors called glioblastomas.

Potential Link Between Brain Development and Breast Cancer Gene

April 9, 2014 2:09 pm | Videos | Comments

Scientists at the Salk Institute have uncovered details into a surprising—and crucial—link between brain development and a gene whose mutation is tied to breast and ovarian cancer. Aside from better understanding neurological damage associated in a small percentage of people susceptible to breast cancers, the new work also helps to better understand the evolution of the brain.

Deep, Integrated Genomic Analysis Re-classifies Lower-grade Brain Tumors

April 9, 2014 2:03 pm | News | Comments

Comprehensive genomic analysis of low-grade brain tumors sorts them into three categories, one of which has the molecular hallmarks and shortened survival of glioblastoma multiforme, the most lethal of brain tumors, researchers reported at the American Association for Cancer Research Annual Meeting 2014.

Researchers Show How Cancer Cells May Respond to Mechanical Force

April 9, 2014 1:42 pm | News | Comments

The push and pull of physical force can cause profound changes in the behavior of a cell. Two studies from researchers working at the UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center reveal how cells respond to mechanical manipulation, a key factor in addressing the underlying causes of cancer and other diseases.

Breaking News: Coffee Intake Linked to Liver Cancer Risk

April 9, 2014 11:16 am | News | Comments

The more cups of coffee a person drank, the lower the risk for developing hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), the most common type of liver cancer, according to new research.                       

Breast Cancer Cell Subpopulation Cooperation Can Spur Tumor Growth

April 8, 2014 2:28 pm | News | Comments

Subpopulations of breast cancer cells sometimes cooperate to aid tumor growth, according to Penn State College of Medicine researchers, who believe that understanding the relationship between cancer subpopulations could lead to new targets for cancer treatment.

Blood Test Could Accurately Detect Solid Cancers

April 7, 2014 2:12 pm | News | Comments

Researchers have devised a way to quickly bring to the clinic the technique of using blood samples to diagnose many types of solid cancers, or to monitor the amount of cancer in a patient’s body and responses to treatment.        

Genetic Flaw May Hold Key to Deadly Brain Tumor

April 7, 2014 1:41 pm | News | Comments

Scientists may have discovered a new way to treat a type of childhood brain tumor that has proved incurable up until now, according to a recent study.                             

Jamming a Protein Signal Forces Cancer Cells to Devour Themselves

April 4, 2014 2:40 pm | News | Comments

Under stress from chemotherapy or radiation, some cancer cells dodge death by consuming a bit of themselves, allowing them to essentially sleep through treatment and later awaken as tougher, resistant disease. Interfering with a single cancer-promoting protein and its receptor can turn this resistance mechanism into lethal, runaway self-cannibalization.

Versatile Nanosponges Now Aimed at MRSA Toxins

April 3, 2014 2:16 pm | by Skip Derra | Articles | Comments

In successful research, any one path can quickly lead to new paths of even more promising results. This branching out of a research project couldn’t be more true than for a team of researchers at the UCSD’s Jacobs School of Engineering. UCSD researchers have developed “nanosponges” that were initially designed as a platform for cancer drug delivery and now are being developed to soak up the dangerous pore-forming toxin produced by MRSA.

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