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Researchers Show How Cancer Cells May Respond to Mechanical Force

April 9, 2014 1:42 pm | News | Comments

The push and pull of physical force can cause profound changes in the behavior of a cell. Two studies from researchers working at the UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center reveal how cells respond to mechanical manipulation, a key factor in addressing the underlying causes of cancer and other diseases.

Breaking News: Coffee Intake Linked to Liver Cancer Risk

April 9, 2014 11:16 am | News | Comments

The more cups of coffee a person drank, the lower the risk for developing hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), the most common type of liver cancer, according to new research.                       

Breast Cancer Cell Subpopulation Cooperation Can Spur Tumor Growth

April 8, 2014 2:28 pm | News | Comments

Subpopulations of breast cancer cells sometimes cooperate to aid tumor growth, according to Penn State College of Medicine researchers, who believe that understanding the relationship between cancer subpopulations could lead to new targets for cancer treatment.

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Blood Test Could Accurately Detect Solid Cancers

April 7, 2014 2:12 pm | News | Comments

Researchers have devised a way to quickly bring to the clinic the technique of using blood samples to diagnose many types of solid cancers, or to monitor the amount of cancer in a patient’s body and responses to treatment.        

Genetic Flaw May Hold Key to Deadly Brain Tumor

April 7, 2014 1:41 pm | News | Comments

Scientists may have discovered a new way to treat a type of childhood brain tumor that has proved incurable up until now, according to a recent study.                             

Jamming a Protein Signal Forces Cancer Cells to Devour Themselves

April 4, 2014 2:40 pm | News | Comments

Under stress from chemotherapy or radiation, some cancer cells dodge death by consuming a bit of themselves, allowing them to essentially sleep through treatment and later awaken as tougher, resistant disease. Interfering with a single cancer-promoting protein and its receptor can turn this resistance mechanism into lethal, runaway self-cannibalization.

Versatile Nanosponges Now Aimed at MRSA Toxins

April 3, 2014 2:16 pm | by Skip Derra | Articles | Comments

In successful research, any one path can quickly lead to new paths of even more promising results. This branching out of a research project couldn’t be more true than for a team of researchers at the UCSD’s Jacobs School of Engineering. UCSD researchers have developed “nanosponges” that were initially designed as a platform for cancer drug delivery and now are being developed to soak up the dangerous pore-forming toxin produced by MRSA.

Nanoparticles Cause Cancer to Self-destruct

April 3, 2014 1:59 pm | Videos | Comments

Using magnetically controlled nanoparticles to force tumor cells to ‘self-destruct’ sounds like science fiction, but could be a future part of cancer treatment, according to research from Lund University in Sweden. The new technique is much more targeted than trying to kill cancer cells with techniques such as chemotherapy.

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Likely Culprit in Spread of Colon Cancer Identified

April 2, 2014 2:39 pm | News | Comments

New research has implicated a poorly understood protein called PLAC8 in the spread of colon cancer. While elevated PLAC8 levels were known to be associated with colon cancer, the researchers now have shown that the protein plays an active role in shifting normal cells lining the colon into a state that encourages metastasis.

Cancer Researchers Find Key Protein Link

March 28, 2014 1:48 pm | News | Comments

A new understanding of proteins at the nexus of a cell’s decision to survive or die has implications for researchers who study cancer and age-related diseases, according to biophysicists at the Rice University-based Center for Theoretical Biological Physics (CTBP). Experiments and computer analysis of two key proteins revealed a previously unknown binding interface that could be addressed by medication.

Natural Plant Compounds May Assist Chemotherapy

March 27, 2014 2:06 pm | News | Comments

Scientists at Plant & Food Research, working together with researchers at The University of Auckland and the National Cancer Institute of The Netherlands, have discovered specific plant compounds able to inhibit transport mechanisms in the body that select what compounds are absorbed into the body,and eventually into cells. These same transport mechanisms are known to interfere with cancer chemotherapy treatment.

3-D MRI Scans Can Predict Survival After Targeted Chemo for Liver Tumors

March 27, 2014 12:48 pm | News | Comments

In a series of studies researchers have used specialized 3-D MRI scans to precisely measure living and dying tumor tissue to quickly show whether highly toxic chemotherapy is working.                   

Cancer Biologists Link Tumor Suppressor Gene to Stem Cells

March 26, 2014 2:09 pm | News | Comments

Just as archeologists try to decipher ancient tablets to discern their meaning, UT Southwestern Medical Center cancer biologists are working to decode the purpose of an ancient gene considered one of the most important in cancer research. The p53 gene appears to be involved in signaling other cells instrumental in stopping tumor development. But the p53 gene predates cancer, so scientists are uncertain what its original function is.

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Peaches Inhibit Breast Cancer Metastasis in Mice

March 26, 2014 9:54 am | News | Comments

Lab tests at Texas A&M AgriLife Research have shown that treatments with peach extract inhibit breast cancer metastasis in mice. AgriLife Research scientists say that the mixture of phenolic compounds present in the peach extract are responsible for the inhibition of metastasis, according to the study.

A Key Link Between Tumors and Healthy Tissue Identified

March 24, 2014 2:49 pm | News | Comments

The delicate balance between development of normal tissue and tumors depends in part upon a key molecular switch within cells, Yale School of Medicine researchers report. Their findings reveal a potential mechanism used by cancer cells to recruit healthy cells to promote tumor growth and suggest new strategies to generate healthy tissue.

Potential Lung Cancer Vaccine Shows Renewed Promise

March 21, 2014 12:09 pm | News | Comments

Researchers at UC Davis have found that the investigational cancer vaccine tecemotide, when administered with the chemotherapeutic cisplatin, boosted immune response and reduced the number of tumors in mice with lung cancer. The study also found that radiation treatments did not significantly impair the immune response.

Catching the Early Spread of Breast Cancer

March 20, 2014 1:30 pm | News | Comments

When cancer spreads from one part of the body to another, it becomes even more deadly. It moves with stealth and can go undetected for months or years. But a new technology that uses “nano-flares” has the potential to catch these lurking, mobilized tumor cells early on. Scientists presented the latest advances in nano-flare technology as it applies to the detection of metastatic breast cancer cells.

IBM's Watson to Help in Brain Cancer Research

March 19, 2014 3:18 pm | by Bree Fowler - AP Technology Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

IBM is teaming up with the New York Genome Center to help fight brain cancer. The company said that its Watson cloud computing system will be used in partnership with a New York-based genetic research center to help develop treatments for glioblastoma, the most common type of brain cancer in U.S. adults.

Archaeologists Discover the Earliest Complete Example of a Human with Cancer

March 18, 2014 2:10 pm | News | Comments

Archaeologists have found the oldest complete example in the world of a human with metastatic cancer in a 3,000 year-old skeleton. The skeleton of the young adult male was found by a Durham University PhD student in a tomb in modern Sudan in 2013 and dates back to 1200BC.

Cancer Therapy May Be Too Targeted

March 17, 2014 2:01 pm | News | Comments

Researchers have identified two novel cancer genes that are associated with the development of a rare, highly aggressive, cancer of blood vessels. These genes may now act as markers for future treatments and explain why narrowly targeted therapies that are directed at just one target fail.

Major ‘Third-hand Smoke’ Compound Causes DNA Damage

March 17, 2014 11:43 am | News | Comments

Scientists are reporting that one compound from “third-hand smoke,” which forms when second-hand smoke reacts with indoor air, damages DNA and sticks to it in a way that could potentially cause cancer.              

Gene Family Proven to Suppress Prostate Cancer

March 14, 2014 1:45 pm | News | Comments

Cornell researchers report they have discovered direct genetic evidence that a family of genes, called MicroRNA-34 (miR-34), are bona fide tumor suppressors. Previous research has shown that another gene, called p53, acts to positively regulate miR-34. Mutations of p53 have been implicated in half of all cancers. miR-34 is also frequently silenced by mechanisms other than p53 in many cancers, including those with p53 mutations.

New Findings Show Link Between Diabetes and Pancreatic Cancer

March 14, 2014 1:10 pm | News | Comments

Researchers from the University of Melbourne have shown that there is an association between pancreatic cancer and diabetes. In a new study, clinicians worked with mathematicians to review data from 1973 to 2013 to conclude there was a time-dependent link between being diagnosed with diabetes and pancreatic cancer.

How Tumors Escape

March 13, 2014 2:28 pm | News | Comments

About 90 percent of cancer deaths are caused by tumors that have spread from their original locations. This process, known as metastasis, requires cancer cells to break loose from their neighbors and from the supportive scaffold that gives tissues their structure. Cancer biologists have now discovered that certain proteins in this structure, known as the extracellular matrix, help cancer cells make their escape.

Cancer Cells Don’t Engage in ‘Drunken’ Walks as They Spread Through the Body in 3D

March 11, 2014 1:41 pm | Videos | Comments

Because of results seen in flat lab dishes, biologists have believed that cancers cells move through the body in a slow, aimless fashion, resembling an intoxicated person who cannot walk in a straight line. This pattern, called a random walk, may hold true for cells traveling across two-dimensional lab containers, but researchers have discovered that for cells moving through 3-D spaces within the body, the “drunken” model doesn’t hold true.

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