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Epigenetic Regulation Required to Ensure Correct Number of Chromosomes

February 18, 2014 1:31 pm | News | Comments

Abnormal number of chromosomes is often associated with cancer development. In a new study, researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden have shown that a subtle epigenetic change plays an important role in the correct segregation of chromosomes.

Grape Seed Promise in Fight Against Bowel Cancer

February 14, 2014 1:09 pm | News | Comments

University of Adelaide research has shown for the first time that grape seed can aid the effectiveness of chemotherapy in killing colon cancer cells as well as reducing the chemotherapy's side effects. The researchers say that combining grape seed extracts with chemotherapy has potential as a new approach for bowel cancer treatment - to both reduce intestinal damage commonly caused by cancer chemotherapy and to enhance its effect.

A Microchip for Metastasis

February 7, 2014 11:32 am | News | Comments

In an attempt to learn how and why certain cancers spread to specific organs, researchers have developed a three-dimensional microfluidic platform that mimics the spread of breast cancer cells into a bonelike environment.         

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Split Decision: Stem Cell Signal Linked With Cancer Growth

February 6, 2014 4:48 pm | News | Comments

Researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have identified a protein critical to hematopoietic stem cell function and blood formation. The finding has potential as a new target for treating leukemia because cancer stem cells rely upon the same protein to regulate and sustain their growth.

A Microchip for Metastasis

February 6, 2014 11:36 am | News | Comments

Nearly 70 percent of patients with advanced breast cancer experience skeletal metastasis, in which cancer cells migrate from a primary tumor into bone—a painful development that can cause fractures and spinal compression. While scientists are attempting to better understand metastasis in general, not much is known about how and why certain cancers spread to specific organs, such as bone, liver, and lungs.

Study Finds Dramatic Rise in Skin Cancer among Middle-Aged Adults

February 5, 2014 7:16 am | Videos | Comments

A new Mayo Clinic study found that among middle-aged men and women, 40 to 60 years old, the overall incidence of skin cancer increased nearly eightfold between 1970 and 2009. There has been widespread concern in recent years about the rising incidence of melanoma, which affects 75,000 Americans annually and results in nearly 9,000 deaths. Few studies, however, have investigated which age brackets of adults are most at risk.

NIH Study Offers Insight into Why Cancer Incidence Increases with Age

February 4, 2014 1:30 pm | Videos | Comments

The accumulation of age-associated changes in a biochemical process that helps control genes may be responsible for some of the increased risk of cancer seen in older people, according to a National Institutes of Health and National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences study.

Scientists Call for Screening Mammography Every Two Years for Most Women

February 4, 2014 11:57 am | News | Comments

Adoption of new guidelines recommending screening mammography every two years for women ages 50 to 74 would result in breast cancer screening that is equally effective, while saving the United States $4.3 billion a year in health care costs, according to a study led by UC San Francisco.

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Red Alert: Body Kills ‘Spontaneous’ Blood Cancers on a Daily Basis

February 3, 2014 11:54 am | News | Comments

Immune cells undergo ‘spontaneous’ changes on a daily basis that could lead to cancers if not for the diligent surveillance of our immune system, scientists have found. The research team from the Walter and Eliza Hall Institute found that the immune system was responsible for eliminating potentially cancerous immune B cells in their early stages, before they developed into B-cell lymphomas (also known as non-Hodgkin’s lymphomas).

Liver Tumors Found in Mice Exposed to BPA

February 3, 2014 11:08 am | Videos | Comments

In one of the first studies to show a significant association between BPA and cancer development, University of Michigan School of Public Health researchers have found liver tumors in mice exposed to the chemical via their mothers during gestation and nursing.

Study Finds Why Some Supplements Might Be Risky

January 29, 2014 6:07 pm | by Lauran Neergaard - AP Medical Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

Antioxidant vitamins are assumed to be cancer fighters, although research in smokers found high doses may raise their risk of tumors. A new study may help explain the paradox. Scientists gave antioxidants to mice that had early-stage lung cancer, and watched the tumors multiply and found that the animals died twice as fast as untreated mice. The reason: The extra vitamins apparently blocked one of the body's key cancer-fighting mechanisms.

Doctors: Too Few Cancer Patients Enroll in Studies

January 28, 2014 5:07 pm | by Marilynn Marchione - AP Chief Medical Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

One of every 10 clinical trials for adults with cancer ends prematurely because researchers can't get enough people to test new treatments, scientists report. The surprisingly high rate reveals not just the scope and cost of wasted opportunities that deprive patients of potential advances, but also the extent of barriers such as money, logistics, and even the mistaken fear that people won't get the best care if they join these experiments.

DNA-built Nanoparticles Safely Target Cancer Tumors

January 28, 2014 1:53 pm | News | Comments

A team of researchers at the University of Toronto has discovered a method of assembling “building blocks” of gold nanoparticles as the vehicle to deliver cancer medications or cancer-identifying markers directly into cancerous tumors. 

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Researchers Decode Decision Circuit of Cancer Metastasis

January 28, 2014 1:22 pm | by Skip Derra | Articles | Comments

New work from Rice University researchers shows promise for zeroing in on cancer’s core decision network that cancer cells use to decide when to metastasize and invade other parts of the body. This could help in waging ‘a cyber war on cancer.’

Study Expands the Cancer Genomics Universe

January 27, 2014 1:36 pm | News | Comments

A study across many cancer types reveals that the universe of cancer mutations is much bigger than previously thought. By analyzing the genomes of thousands of patients’ tumors, a Broad Institute-led research team has discovered many new cancer genes — expanding the list of known genes tied to these cancers by 25 percent.

Scientists Develop Powerful New Animal Model for Metastatic Prostate Cancer

January 27, 2014 1:02 pm | News | Comments

Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory (CSHL) scientists have developed a new method to rapidly create much better mouse models for metastatic prostate cancer. This discovery allows scientists to investigate the causes of the disease while at the same time testing new therapeutics to treat it.

NIH Scientists Map Genetic Changes that Drive Tumors in a Common Pediatric Soft-tissue Cancer

January 24, 2014 1:44 pm | News | Comments

Scientists have mapped the genetic changes that drive tumors in rhabdomyosarcoma, a pediatric soft-tissue cancer, and found that the disease is characterized by two distinct genotypes. The genetic alterations identified in this malignancy could be useful in developing targeted diagnostic tools and treatments for children with the disease.

New Computer Model May Aid Personalized Cancer Care

January 24, 2014 1:27 pm | News | Comments

Dana-Farber Cancer Institute scientists have developed a mathematical model to predict how a patient’s tumor is likely to behave and which of several possible treatments is most likely to be effective. Researchers combined several types of data from pre- and post-treatment biopsies of breast tumors to obtain a molecular picture of how the cancer evolved as a result of chemotherapy.

FAK Protein Helps Tumor Cells Enter Bloodstream

January 21, 2014 8:32 am | News | Comments

Cancer cells have something that every prisoner longs for— a master key that allows them to escape. A study describes how a protein that promotes tumor growth also enables cancer cells to use this key and metastasize.          

Not Just Clean but Spotless – Researchers Show How Cells Tidy Up

January 17, 2014 2:56 pm | News | Comments

New findings from the team of Claudine Kraft at the Max F. Perutz Laboratories (MFPL) of the University of Vienna and the Medical University of Vienna give insights into how cells dispose of their waste. Malfunctions in this process have been linked to Alzheimer’s disease and cancer.

Amgen, Illumina Team on Personalized Medicine Test

January 15, 2014 5:19 pm | by The Associated Press | News | Comments

Biotech drugmaker Amgen and Illumina, a maker of genetic testing equipment, said Wednesday they are developing a test that will identify patients who might be helped by Amgen's colon cancer drug Vectibix. Vectibix is approved as a treatment for colorectal cancer that has spread and hasn't rresponded to chemotherapy.

Training T Cells to Fight Their Own Cancers

January 15, 2014 1:48 pm | by Cynthia Fox | Articles | Comments

Immunotherapy—the art and science of training peoples’ immune systems to fight their own cancers—was named Breakthrough of the Year by Science. Prominently mentioned was an approach seeing clinical success: genetically tweaking patients’ own T cells to make them more potent, proliferative, and targeted.

New Breast Cancer Stem Cell Findings Explain How Cancer Spreads

January 15, 2014 11:55 am | News | Comments

Breast cancer stem cells exist in two different states and each state plays a role in how cancer spreads, according to an international collaboration of researchers. Their finding sheds new light on the process that makes cancer a deadly disease.

Study Shows Promise for Preventing Resistance in Tumors

January 10, 2014 12:25 pm | News | Comments

A new study suggests that activating the tumor suppressor p53 in normal cells causes them to secrete Par-4, another potent tumor suppressor protein that induces cell death in cancer cells.                  

Technique Can Further Understanding of RNA

January 10, 2014 11:32 am | News | Comments

Researchers have revealed a new, powerful technique to visualize the shape and motion of RNA at the atomic level using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR).                         

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