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Cancer Risk: Aspirin and Smoking Affect Aging of Genes

July 1, 2014 11:23 am | News | Comments

The risk of developing cancer increases with age. Factors like smoking and regular aspirin use also affect the risk of cancer—although in the opposite sense. Researchers from the University of Basel were now able to show that aspirin use and smoking both influence aging processes of the female genome that are connected to colorectal cancer.

Diabolical Duo: Breast Cancer Gene Needs Partner to Grow

June 27, 2014 1:36 pm | News | Comments

A new study has revealed that the gene Metadherin— which is implicated in promoting the spread of breast cancer tumors— only stimulates tumor growth when the protein made by the gene interacts with a second protein known as SND1.      

Continued Use of Low-dose Aspirin May Lower Pancreatic Cancer Risk

June 26, 2014 1:02 pm | News | Comments

The longer a person took low-dose aspirin, the lower their risk for developing pancreatic cancer, according to a recently published study. Men and women who took low-dose aspirin regularly had 48 percent reduction in their risk for developing pancreatic cancer. Protection ranged from 39 percent reduction in risk for those who took low-dose aspirin for six years or less, to 60 percent reduction for those who took it for more than 10 years.

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3-D Mammograms May Find More Breast Cancer

June 24, 2014 5:19 pm | by Lindsey Tanner - AP Medical Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

3-D mammograms may be better at finding cancer than regular scans, a large study suggests, although whether that means saving more lives isn't known. The study involved almost half a million breast scans, with more than one-third of them using relatively new 3-D imaging along with conventional scans.

Cancer Chain in the Membrane

June 24, 2014 1:50 pm | Videos | Comments

Supercomputer simulations have shown that clusters of a protein linked to cancer warp cell membranes, according to scientists at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth) Medical School. This research on these protein clusters, or aggregates as scientists call them, could help guide design of new anticancer drugs.

Breathalyzer Test May Detect Deadliest Cancer

June 18, 2014 4:54 pm | News | Comments

Lung cancer causes more deaths in the U.S. than the next three most common cancers combined. The reason for the striking mortality rate is simple: poor detection. Lung cancer attacks without leaving any fingerprints, quietly afflicting its victims and metastasizing uncontrollably—to the point of no return. Now a new device may turn the tide by both accurately detecting lung cancer and identifying its stage of progression. 

Mammograms May Cut Breast Cancer Deaths by 28%

June 17, 2014 9:19 pm | by Maria Cheng - AP Medical Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

In the latest major study to consider whether the dangers of mammograms outweigh the benefits, experts say the tests can reduce the chances of dying from breast cancer by nearly 30 percent and that national screening programs should continue.

ASCO Recap: Leaning in at the Plate, Swinging for the Fences

June 17, 2014 1:57 pm | by Neil Canavan | Articles | Comments

Everyone loves a grand slam: the crack of the bat, the arc of the ball as it sails over the fence, a tip of the batter’s cap, a triumphal trot around as the bases empty out, but really, it’s the lesser efforts that made it all possible—a double, a single, a walk—it’s the incremental gains that win the game. It’s called Small Ball. This year’s ASCO, absent the heavy hitters, was all about the small ball.

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Gene ‘Switch’ Reverses Cancer in Common Childhood Leukemia Model

June 17, 2014 12:00 pm | News | Comments

Melbourne researchers have shown a type of leukemia can be successfully ‘reversed’ by coaxing the cancer cells back into normal development. The discovery was made using a model of B-progenitor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL), the most common cancer affecting children.

Lipids Can Help Fight Leukemia

June 16, 2014 2:23 pm | News | Comments

A new study shows that a tumor-associated lipid stimulates specific T cells, which efficiently kill leukemia cells both in vitro and in animal models.                             

Researchers Chart Cellular Complexity of Brain Tumors

June 16, 2014 2:20 pm | News | Comments

Scientists from the Broad Institute and Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) have conducted a first-of-its-kind study that characterizes the cellular diversity within glioblastoma tumors from patients. The study, which looked at the expression of thousands of genes in individual cells from patient tumors, revealed that the cellular makeup of each tumor is more heterogeneous than previously suspected.

ASCO Sessions Feel Funding Impact

June 13, 2014 2:49 pm | by Neil Canavan | Articles | Comments

Federal funding for cancer research has diminished over the last ten years, and the negative impact on research is now apparent. There were no blockbuster revelations, no flashy new kid on the block, no miracle cures at this year’s ASCO. Of the four studies selected for the plenary session (where presentations are often THE important findings of the conference), only one is predicted to have a major impact on patient care.

Researchers Discover New Form of Cancer

June 11, 2014 2:01 pm | Videos | Comments

By themselves, PAX3 and MAML3 don’t cause any problems. However, when they combine during an abnormal but recurring chromosomal mismatch, they can be dangerous. The result is a chimera—a gene that is half of each—and that causes biphenotypic sinonasal sarcoma. The tumor usually begins in the nose and may infiltrate the rest of the face, requiring disfiguring surgery to save the individual.

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Study: Red Meat Possibly Linked to Breast Cancer

June 10, 2014 7:16 pm | by Maria Cheng - AP Medical Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

Women who often indulge their cravings for hamburgers, steaks and other red meat may have a slightly higher risk of breast cancer, a new study suggests. Doctors have long warned that a diet loaded with red meat is linked to cancers including those of the colon and pancreas, but there has been less evidence for its role in breast cancer.

Targeting Tumors Using Silver Nanoparticles

June 9, 2014 2:10 pm | News | Comments

Scientists at UC Santa Barbara have designed a nanoparticle that has a couple of unique — and important — properties. Spherical in shape and silver in composition, it is encased in a shell coated with a peptide that enables it to target tumor cells. What’s more, the shell is etchable so those nanoparticles that don’t hit their target can be broken down and eliminated.

Researchers Pinpoint New Role for Enzyme in DNA Repair

June 9, 2014 1:23 pm | News | Comments

Twelve years ago, researchers found that a protein called Set2 plays a role in how yeast genes are expressed– specifically how DNA gets transcribed into messenger RNA. Now, it has been discovered that Set2 is also a major player in DNA repair, a complicated and crucial process that can lead to the development of cancer cells.

Longer Telomeres Linked to Brain Cancer Risk

June 9, 2014 1:12 pm | News | Comments

New genomic research revealed that two common gene variants that lead to longer telomeres, the caps on chromosome ends thought by many scientists to confer health by protecting cells from aging, also significantly increase the risk of developing the deadly brain cancers known as gliomas.

Vitamin D Protects Against Liver Cancer

June 9, 2014 1:06 pm | News | Comments

Vitamin D has been shown to play an important role in liver function. Now, a new study in Western Europeans shows that vitamin D lowers the risk of developing hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), the main form of liver cancer.          

Seemingly Invincible Cancer Stem Cells Reveal a Weakness

June 6, 2014 12:55 pm | News | Comments

Metastatic cancer cells, which can migrate from primary tumors to seed new malignancies, have thus far been resistant to the current arsenal of anticancer drugs. Now, researchers have identified a critical weakness that actually exploits one of these cells’ apparent strengths—their ability to move and invade tissues.

Prostate Cancer Biomarkers Found in Seminal Fluid

June 6, 2014 12:35 pm | News | Comments

Improved diagnosis and management of one of the most common cancers in men- prostate cancer- could result from research, which has discovered that seminal fluid (semen) contains biomarkers for the disease.              

Tool Enables Better Delivery of Brain Cancer Treatment

June 5, 2014 2:17 pm | News | Comments

Surgery and radiation for a glioblastoma have only limited effectiveness because the tumor is particularly aggressive, infiltrating brain tissue surrounding the primary tumor. Scientists have developed a technique designed to open the blood-brain barrier at targeted locations just far enough to allow the passage of drug-bearing nanoparticles.

Test Predicts if Breast Cancer Will Spread

June 4, 2014 2:21 pm | News | Comments

A test that counts the number of locations in tumor specimens where tumor cells may invade blood vessels predicted the risk of distant spread, or metastasis, for the most common type of breast cancer.               

Experimental Drug Targets Skin, Lung Cancers

June 4, 2014 1:55 pm | News | Comments

Researchers are reporting promising treatment milestones for patients with deadly skin and lung cancers who are being treated with an experimental drug called MK-3475.                        

BRCA2 Gene Now Connected to Lung Cancer, Doubling a Smoker's Risk

June 2, 2014 2:38 pm | News | Comments

New research confirms a vulnerability to lung cancer can be inherited and implicates the BRCA2 gene as harboring one of the involved genetic mutations. The study scanned the genomes of more than 11 thousand individuals of European descent to look for common variations associated with non-small cell carcinoma. The analysis showed that variations in the BRCA2 and CHEK2 genes can significantly increase an individual's risk for lung cancer.

Radiation for Prostate Cancer Linked to Secondary Cancers

May 30, 2014 11:59 am | News | Comments

Among men treated for prostate cancer, those who received radiation therapy were more likely to develop bladder or rectal cancer, according to a new study.                            

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