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RNA Molecules in Urine and Tissue Can Detect Prostate Cancer

October 9, 2014 1:40 pm | News | Comments

Researchers have identified a set of RNA molecules that are detectable in tissue samples and urine of prostate cancer patients, but not in normal healthy individuals.                         

Green Tea-based ‘Missiles’ May Kill Cancer Cells

October 7, 2014 1:17 pm | News | Comments

Green tea has long been known for its anti-oxidant, anti-cancer, anti-aging and anti-microbial properties. Now, a group of researchers has taken the health benefits of green tea to the next level by using one of its ingredients to develop a drug delivery system.

First Pictures of BRCA2 Protein Show How it Repairs DNA

October 6, 2014 12:00 pm | News | Comments

Scientists have taken pictures of the BRCA2 protein for the first time, showing how it works to repair damaged DNA. Mutations in the gene that encodes BRCA2 are well known for raising the risk of breast cancer and other cancers.      

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New Visualization Software Uncovers Cancer Subtypes

October 3, 2014 1:42 pm | News | Comments

Much of biomedical research these days is about big data—collecting and analyzing vast, detailed repositories of information about health and disease. These data sets can be treasure troves for investigators, often uncovering genetic mutations that drive a particular kind of cancer, for example.

Discovery Could Prevent Development of Brain Tumors in Children

October 2, 2014 3:10 pm | News | Comments

Scientists discovered a mechanism that promotes the progression of medulloblastoma, the most common brain tumor found in children. The team found that a protein known as Sonic Hedgehog induces DNA damage, which causes the cancer to develop.   

MicroRNA Tied to Colon Cancer Tumor Growth

October 2, 2014 2:57 pm | News | Comments

Researchers have identified microRNAs that may cause colon polyps from turning cancerous. The finding could help physicians provide more specialized, and earlier, treatment before colon cancer develops.               

Study Examines Cancer Risk from First Atom-bomb Test

September 30, 2014 8:30 am | by Susan Montoya Bryan - Associated Press - Associated Press | News | Comments

Researchers from the National Cancer Institute want to know how many past and present cancer cases in New Mexico may be related to the U.S. government's test of the world's first atomic bomb over a remote stretch of desert nearly 70 years ago.  

Biologists Find an Early Sign of Pancreatic Cancer

September 29, 2014 12:39 pm | News | Comments

Years before they show any other signs of disease, pancreatic cancer patients have very high levels of certain amino acids in their bloodstream, according to a new study.                        

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How a Single, Genetic Change Causes Retinal Tumors in Children

September 26, 2014 8:30 am | News | Comments

New research has answered the long-standing question of why mutations to the RB1 gene primarily cause tumors of the retina and not of other cell types. The study could reveal new cellular signaling pathways relevant to retinal development, cancer development, and ultimately, the development of novel therapies.

BST This Week #19: Smelly Grass Fights Off Bugs

September 26, 2014 8:30 am | Videos | Comments

On this episode of Bioscience Technology This Week, Christina Jakubowski reports on a discovery that claims the smell of mown grass is actually an SOS for help in resisting insect attacks. Our second story covers the possibility that modified vitamin D can help fight pancreatic cancer.

Simple Blood Test a Possible Tool for Early Cancer Diagnosis

September 26, 2014 8:30 am | News | Comments

High levels of calcium in blood, a condition known as hypercalcemia, can be used by GPs as an early indication of certain types of cancer, according to a new study.                          

Chemists Recruit Anthrax to Deliver Cancer Drugs

September 26, 2014 8:30 am | News | Comments

Bacillus anthracis bacteria have very efficient machinery for injecting toxic proteins into cells, leading to the potentially deadly infection known as anthrax. A team of researchers has now hijacked that delivery system for a different purpose: administering cancer drugs.

Toward Better Treatments for Autoimmune Diseases, Bone Loss

September 25, 2014 8:30 am | News | Comments

Scientists have developed an approach to creating treatments for osteoporosis and autoimmune diseases that may avoid the risk of infection and cancer posed by some current medications.                   

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Pancreatic Cancer Insight

September 25, 2014 8:30 am | News | Comments

An analysis of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in a mouse model of pancreatic cancer has identified distinct patterns of gene expression in several groups of these cells, including significant differences from the primary tumor that may contribute to their ability to spread.

Gene Linked to Development of Skin Cancer in Mice

September 23, 2014 1:52 pm | News | Comments

New research on an enzyme linked to cancer development shows that 37 percent of mice that produce excessive quantities of the enzyme developed skin tumors within four to 12 months of birth, and many of these growths progressed to highly invasive squamous cell carcinoma, a common form of skin cancer.

Abnormal Properties of Cancer Protein Revealed in Fly Eyes

September 17, 2014 12:44 pm | News | Comments

Mutations in the human retinoblastoma protein gene are a leading cause of eye cancer. Now, scientists have turned to fruit fly eyes to unlock the secrets of this important cancer gene.                   

Clues Explain How Breast Implants May Cause Lymphoma

September 16, 2014 2:58 pm | News | Comments

Researchers have identified clues to explain how breast implants may, on very rare occasions, contribute to the development of lymphoma. There have been 71 known cases worldwide of a type of blood cancer called anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) that the researchers suggest were associated with the patient's breast implants.

New Knowledge of Genes Driving Bladder Cancer Points to Targeted Treatments

September 15, 2014 1:08 pm | News | Comments

The story of cancer care seems so simple: find the mutated gene that causes cancer and turn it off or fix it. But rarely does a single gene cause cancer. More often, many genes are altered together to drive the disease. So the challenge becomes sorting out which altered genes are the most to blame in which cancers. A new study takes an important step toward answering this question in bladder cancer.

Study Links Genetic Mutation to Melanoma Progression

September 11, 2014 3:45 pm | News | Comments

Researchers have found that the genetic mutation BRAFV600E , frequently found in metastatic melanoma, not only secretes a protein that promotes the growth of melanoma tumor cells, but can also modify the network of normal cells around the tumor to support the disease's progression.

‘Electronic Skin’ Could Improve Early Breast Cancer Detection

September 10, 2014 11:27 am | News | Comments

For detecting cancer, manual breast exams seem low-tech compared to other methods such as MRI. But scientists are now developing an “electronic skin” that “feels” and images small lumps that fingers can miss.            

Team Finds Ovarian Cancer Oncogene in 'Junk DNA'

September 9, 2014 3:43 pm | News | Comments

Over the years researchers have made tremendous strides in the understanding and treatment of cancer by searching genomes for links between genetic alterations and disease. Now, a team of researchers has mined "junk DNA" sequences to identify a non-protein-coding RNA whose expression is linked to ovarian cancer.

Breaking News: Prediabetes Ups Cancer Risk 15%

September 9, 2014 9:04 am | News | Comments

A meta-analysis comprising 16 studies and 891,426 participants from various regions of the world shows that prediabetes increases the risk of cancer by 15 percent, with differing risks depending on the type of cancer.         

Parkinson's, Cancer Findings Earn Lasker Awards

September 8, 2014 9:23 am | by Malcolm Ritter - AP Science Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

Key discoveries about breast cancer, Parkinson's disease and the body's handling of defective proteins have earned prestigious medical awards for five scientists. The Albert and Mary Lasker Foundation announced the winners Monday.     

Scanner Could Aid Brain Tumor Removal, Reduce Recurrence

September 3, 2014 2:13 pm | News | Comments

Cancerous brain tumors are notorious for growing back despite surgical attempts to remove them. But scientists are currently developing a new way to try to root out malignant cells during surgery so fewer or none get left behind to form new tumors.

Double Mastectomy Doesn't Boost Survival for Most

September 2, 2014 4:23 pm | by Lindsey Tanner - AP Medical Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

Removing both breasts to treat cancer affecting only one side doesn't boost survival chances for most women, compared with surgery that removes just the tumor, a large study suggests.                    

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