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Scientists Find How Many Cancers May Evade Treatment

January 16, 2015 10:54 am | by University of Wisconsin-Madison | News | Comments

The drugs were designed to keep cancer cells at bay by preventing their growth, survival and spread. Yet, after clinical trials, they left scientists scratching their heads and drug developers watching their investments succumb to cancer’s latest triumph.

Studying Fetal Liver Fibrogenesis

January 14, 2015 4:07 pm | by Sarah Plumridge, Northwestern University | News | Comments

Fibrosis is a constant feature of all chronic liver diseases.                                 

Scientists Create Device for Extracting Tumor Cells from Blood

January 13, 2015 3:13 pm | by UCLA | News | Comments

When 2 milliliters of blood are run through the chip, the tumor cells stick to the nanowires like Velcro.                          

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Genome Sequencing of 200-Year-Old Whales May Help Humans Fight Disease

January 13, 2015 9:07 am | by Cynthia Fox, Science Writer | Articles | Comments

For the first time, the genome of a mammal longer-lived than man has been sequenced: the bowhead whale, who lives 200-plus years, and gets far less cancer given its size.                                       

Hacking Fat Cells' Metabolism Does Not Affect Insulin Resistance

January 12, 2015 9:26 am | by Johns Hopkins University | News | Comments

In the race to find a safe and effective weight loss drug, much attention has focused on the chemical processes that store and use energy.                     

Tracing Cancer Back to Its Origins

January 12, 2015 9:23 am | by Columbia University | News | Comments

The fingers of papillary tumors often grow back after surgery, but flat carcinoma in situ cancers are typically more aggressive and more likely to spread.                  

Radiation, Hormone Therapy Prolong Survival for Older Men With Prostate Cancer

January 7, 2015 4:30 pm | by University of Pennsylvania | News | Comments

Adding radiation treatment to hormone therapy saves more lives among older men with locally advanced prostate therapy than hormone therapy alone.                   

Researchers Study Potential Blood Test for Prostate Cancer

January 5, 2015 4:11 pm | by Vanderbilt University | News | Comments

Vanderbilt University researcher William Mitchell, M.D., Ph.D., and colleagues in Germany and Canada have demonstrated a method for detecting “cell-free” tumor DNA in the bloodstream.                            

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Technology Detects Lingering Cancer Cells During Breast Surgery

January 5, 2015 3:57 pm | by NYU | News | Comments

Patients are benefitting from new technology that detects microscopic amounts of cancer cells on removed tumor tissue not visible during or following surgical intervention.               

New Clues Why Older Women Are More Susceptible to Breast Cancer

January 5, 2015 3:48 pm | by Skip Derra, Contributing Writer | Articles | Comments

The idea that breast cancer becomes more prevalent with age is fairly well established, but the reasons why are still uncertain. Now, scientists from the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory have new insights into why older women are more susceptible to breast cancer.

A Fascinating Year in Breast Cancer Advances

January 5, 2015 8:50 am | by Cynthia Fox, Science Writer | Articles | Comments

Some of the most important advances in breast cancer this year were related to all kinds of heterogeneity: within tumors, between tumors in a single patient, and between tumors in early and later stages, according to oncologists speaking at conferences, and contacted by Bioscience Technology.

Targeting the Cell's 'Biological Clock' in Promising New Cancer Therapy

January 2, 2015 9:22 am | News | Comments

Cell biologists at UT Southwestern Medical Center have targeted telomeres with a small molecule called 6-thiodG that takes advantage of the cell’s “biological clock” to kill cancer cells and shrink tumor growth.                                  

Bad Luck Plays Predominant Role in Cancer: Study

January 2, 2015 9:14 am | News | Comments

Scientists from the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center have created a statistical model that measures the proportion of cancer incidence, across many tissue types, caused mainly by random mutations that occur when stem cells divide. 

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Reprogramming Stem Cells May Prevent Cancer After Radiation

December 30, 2014 2:46 pm | by Garth Sundem, University of Colorado | News | Comments

The body has evolved ways to get rid of faulty stem cells.                                  

Scientists Zero in on How Lung Cancer Spreads

December 26, 2014 10:09 am | by Cancer Research UK | News | Comments

Cancer Research UK scientists have taken microscopic images revealing that the protein ties tethering cells together are severed in lung cancer cells - meaning they can break loose and spread, according to research published in Cell Reports.  

Scientists ID Rare Cancer's Genetic Pathways

December 24, 2014 9:41 am | News | Comments

An international research team, including four Simon Fraser University scientists, has identified the "mutational landscape" of intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICC), a rare, highly fatal form of liver cancer that disproportionately affects people in Asian countries.

Whole-Genome Sequencing Can Identify Cancer-Related Mutations

December 24, 2014 9:35 am | News | Comments

UT Southwestern Medical Center cancer researchers have demonstrated that whole-genome sequencing can be used to identify patients' risk for hereditary cancer, which can potentially lead to improvements in cancer prevention, diagnosis, and care.

Scientists Discover How Resveratrol Provides Health Benefits

December 22, 2014 4:12 pm | by The Scripps Research Institute | News | Comments

Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute have found that this red-wine ingredient once touted as an elixir of youth, powerfully activates an evolutionarily ancient stress response in human cells.          

Team Finds New Genetic Anomalies in Lung Cancer

December 22, 2014 10:56 am | News | Comments

Developing effective treatments for lung cancer has been challenging, in part because so many genetic mutations play a role in the disease. By analyzing the DNA and RNA of lung cancers, researchers at the University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center found that patients whose tumors contained a large number of gene fusions had worse outcomes than patients with fewer gene fusions.

Meet The Newest Surgeon General

December 22, 2014 10:15 am | by Ryan Bushey, Associate Editor | Articles | Comments

President Obama's pick for the position turned out to be controversial.                                

10 Up-and-Coming Healthcare Medical Innovations

December 17, 2014 5:32 pm | by Christina Jakubowski, Managing Editor | Articles | Comments

The Cleveland Clinic recently unveiled their annual Top 10 Medical Innovations for 2015– a list that casts an optimistic light on up-and-coming healthcare advances that may reach consumers next year.                                       

New Lens-Free Microscope Detects Cancer At Cellular Level

December 17, 2014 4:27 pm | by UCLA | News | Comments

Researchers have developed a lens-free microscope that can be used to detect the presence of cancer or other cell-level abnormalities with the same accuracy as larger and more expensive optical microscopes.         

Women in Cell Biology Award Winners Announced at ASCB Meeting

December 17, 2014 10:05 am | by Stephanie Guzowski, Editor, Drug Discovery & Development | Articles | Comments

Three exceptional women were given awards for their achievements and contributions to the scientific community at the 2014 ASCB (American Society for Cell Biology) meeting recently held in Philadelphia, Pa.

Going After Colon Cancer With Strep Bacteria

December 17, 2014 9:40 am | by Skip Derra, Contributing Writer | Articles | Comments

A novel therapeutic to fight colon cancer by using the bacteria primarily responsible for causing strep throat is being explored in the labs of John McCormick of the Schulich School of Medicine & Dentistry at the University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, Canada.

Interactions Between Proteins Govern Tumor Suppression, Aging

December 16, 2014 12:54 pm | by UC Davis | News | Comments

Scientists have long known the p53 protein suppresses tumors. However, a recent animal study by UC Davis researchers has uncovered a complicated relationship between p53 and another protein, Rbm38, highlighting how the body calibrates protein levels. Too much Rbm38 reduces p53 levels, increasing the risk of cancer. Too little Rbm38 allows p53 overexpression, causing premature aging.

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