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CTC Clusters More Likely to Cause Metastasis

August 29, 2014 8:30 am | News | Comments

Circulating tumor cell clusters- clumps of from two to 50 tumor cells that break off a primary tumor and are carried through the bloodstream- appear to be much more likely to cause metastasis than are single CTCs, according to a new study.    

Tomato-rich Diet Can Cut Prostate Cancer Risk

August 27, 2014 12:47 pm | News | Comments

Men who eat over 10 portions a week of tomatoes have an 18 per cent lower risk of developing...

Cancer Leaves a Common Fingerprint on DNA

August 26, 2014 1:45 pm | News | Comments

Regardless of their stage or type, cancers appear to share a telltale signature of widespread...

Sorting Cells with Sound Waves

August 26, 2014 1:29 pm | Videos | Comments

Researchers have devised a new way to separate cells by exposing them to sound waves as they...

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Exercise Can Impact Breast Cancer Risk

August 25, 2014 3:38 pm | by Cynthia Fox | Articles | Comments

A large new study found that when post-menopausal women stop physical activity, their odds of developing breast cancer rise. But, the study also found that breast cancer risk drops surprisingly rapidly after exercise starts.                  

New Approach Helps to Identify Cancer 'Drivers'

August 25, 2014 1:13 pm | News | Comments

Researchers have developed a new integrated approach to pinpoint the genetic “drivers” of cancer, uncovering eight genes that could be viable for targeted breast cancer therapy.                     

Severing Nerves May Shrink Stomach Cancers

August 21, 2014 11:07 am | News | Comments

Research shows that nerves may play a critical role in stomach cancer growth and that blocking nerve signals using surgery or Botox (onabotulinumtoxinA) could be an effective treatment for the disease.              

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Gene Predicts Breast Cancer Relapse, Response to Chemo

August 20, 2014 12:29 pm | News | Comments

Scientists have made it easier to predict both breast cancer relapses and responses to chemotherapy, through the identification of a unique gene, a new study shows.                         

Next-Generation Sequencing and the Transformation of Cancer Care

August 18, 2014 3:20 pm | by Darren Lee, Vice President, Marketing & Business Development, Nabsys | White Papers

NGS is revolutionizing the field of genome biology, with much faster data generation, increased accuracy, and a dramatic reduction of sequencing costs. Multiple genomes can now be sequenced in parallel by a single instrument in a matter of days. In the medical field, NGS is already having an impact in genetic screening and holds great potential in oncology, given the genetic aspects of cancerous disease.

Previous Pulmonary Disease May Up Lung Cancer Risk

August 15, 2014 12:14 pm | News | Comments

Links between a number of common respiratory diseases and an increased risk of developing lung cancer have been found in a large pooled analysis of seven studies involving more than 25,000 individuals.               

Immune Cell Discovery Could Help to Halt Cancer Spread

August 14, 2014 2:09 pm | News | Comments

Melbourne researchers have revealed the critical importance of highly specialized immune cells, called natural killer cells, in killing melanoma cells that have spread to the lungs. These natural killer cells could be harnessed to hunt down and kill cancers that have spread in the body.

Injected Bacteria Shrink Tumors in Rats, Dogs, Humans

August 14, 2014 10:17 am | News | Comments

A modified version of the Clostridium novyi (C. novyi-NT) bacterium can produce a strong and precisely targeted anti-tumor response in rats, dogs and now humans, according to a new report.                 

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Bioscience Technology This Week #7: Fruit Flies Unlock the Mysteries of Diabetes

August 13, 2014 2:20 pm | Videos | Comments

In this episode of Bioscience Technology This Week, Rob Fee discusses how studying fruit flies could revolutionize diabetes research. Our second story focuses on how venom could form the basis of a new class of cancerfighting drugs.    

New Analysis Reveals Tumor Weaknesses

August 13, 2014 1:47 pm | News | Comments

Scientists have known for decades that cancer can be caused by genetic mutations, but more recently they have discovered that chemical modifications of a gene can also contribute to cancer. These alterations, known as epigenetic modifications, control whether a gene is turned on or off.

Prostate Cancer Diagnosis Improves with MRI Technology

August 13, 2014 11:03 am | Videos | Comments

Oncologists are melding magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technology with a traditional ultrasound prostate exam to create a three-dimensional map of the prostate that allows physicians to view growths that were previously undetectable.      

Scientists Pinpoint Gene Likely to Promote Childhood Cancers

August 12, 2014 2:28 pm | News | Comments

Researchers at the Children’s Medical Center Research Institute at UT Southwestern (CRI) have identified a gene that contributes to the development of several childhood cancers, in a study conducted with mice designed to model the cancers. If the findings prove to be applicable to humans, the research could lead to new strategies for targeting certain childhood cancers at a molecular level.

Synthetic Molecule Makes Cancer Self-Destruct

August 12, 2014 2:21 pm | News | Comments

Researchers from The University of Texas at Austin and five other institutions have created a molecule that can cause cancer cells to self-destruct by ferrying sodium and chloride ions into the cancer cells. These synthetic ion transporters confirm a two-decades-old hypothesis that could point the way to new anticancer drugs while also benefiting patients with cystic fibrosis.

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Hijacking the Brain's Blood Supply: Tumor Discovery Could Aid Treatment

August 12, 2014 1:55 pm | News | Comments

Dangerous brain tumors hijack the brain’s existing blood supply throughout their progression, by growing only within narrow potential spaces between and along the brain’s thousands of small blood vessels, new research shows for the first time.

Editing HPV's Genes to Kill Cervical Cancer Cells

August 11, 2014 2:13 pm | News | Comments

Researchers have hijacked a defense system normally used by bacteria to fend off viral infections and redirected it against the human papillomavirus (HPV), the virus that causes cervical, head and neck, and other cancers.Using the genome editing tool known as CRISPR, the Duke University researchers were able to selectively destroy two viral genes responsible for the growth and survival of cervical carcinoma cells.

Scientists Unlock Key to Blood Vessel Formation

August 11, 2014 2:09 pm | News | Comments

Scientists from the University of Leeds have discovered a gene that plays a vital role in blood vessel formation, research which adds to our knowledge of how early life develops. The discovery could also lead to greater understanding of how to treat cardiovascular diseases and cancer.

Cell Mechanics May Hold Key to How Cancer Spreads and Recurs

August 7, 2014 2:34 pm | News | Comments

Cancer cells that break away from tumors to go looking for a new home may prefer to settle into a soft bed. Some particularly enterprising cancer cells can cause a cancer to spread to other organs, called metastasis, or evade treatment to resurface after a patient is thought to be in remission. A team found that these so-called tumor-repopulating cells may lurk quietly in stiffer cellular environments, but thrive in a softer space.

Largest Cancer Genetic Analysis Reveals New Way of Classifying Cancer

August 7, 2014 2:24 pm | News | Comments

Researchers with The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) Research Network have completed the largest, most diverse tumor genetic analysis ever conducted, revealing a new approach to classifying cancers. The work not only revamps traditional ideas of how cancers are diagnosed and treated, but could also have a profound impact on the future landscape of drug development.

New Gene Tied to Breast Cancer Risk

August 6, 2014 5:23 pm | by Marilynn Marchione - AP Chief Medical Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

It's long been known that faulty BRCA genes greatly raise the risk for breast cancer. Now, scientists say a more recently identified, less common gene - called PALB2 - can do the same.                 

New DNA Analysis Technique Promises Speedier Diagnosis

August 5, 2014 2:01 pm | News | Comments

Researchers have achieved a technical breakthrough that should result in speedier diagnosis of cancer and various pre-natal conditions. The key discovery lies in a new tool that allows researchers to load long strands of DNA into a tunable nanoscale imaging chamber in ways that maintain their structural identity and under conditions that are similar to those found in the human body.

New Genetic Risk Markers Found in Pancreatic Cancer

August 4, 2014 12:46 pm | News | Comments

A large DNA analysis of people with and without pancreatic cancer has identified several new genetic markers that signal increased risk of developing the highly lethal disease, scientists report.               

Chili Pepper Chemical May Inhibit Gut Tumors

August 4, 2014 12:35 pm | News | Comments

Researchers report that dietary capsaicin– the active ingredient in chili peppers– produces chronic activation of a receptor on cells lining the intestines of mice, triggering a reaction that ultimately reduces the risk of colorectal tumors.   

Drug Target Identified for Common Childhood Blood Cancer

July 31, 2014 12:00 pm | News | Comments

In what is believed to be the largest genetic analysis of what triggers and propels progression of tumor growth in a common childhood blood cancer, researchers report that they have identified a possible new drug target for treating the disease. 

Same Cancer, Different Time Zone

July 31, 2014 8:30 am | News | Comments

Just as no two people possess the same genetic makeup, a recent study has shown that no two single tumor cells in breast cancer patients have an identical genome.                          

Team Makes Cancer Glow to Improve Surgical Outcomes

July 30, 2014 1:49 pm | News | Comments

The best way to cure most cases of cancer is to surgically remove the tumor. The Achilles heel of this approach, however, is that the surgeon may fail to extract the entire tumor, leading to a local recurrence. With a new technique, researchers at the University of Pennsylvania have established a new strategy to help surgeons see the entire tumor in the patient, increasing the likelihood of a positive outcome.

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