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The Lead

Advance in Capturing Elusive Circulating Tumor Cells

July 29, 2014 3:33 pm | by Cynthia Fox | Articles | Comments

When cancers spread into the bloodstream, they often take on different characteristics, requiring different therapies. But it is hard to find these rare blood-borne cells. So, relapsed patients often do not get personalized care. Now, researchers have come up with a solution that zeros in on elusive circulating tumor cells (CTCs).

Cell's Recycling Center Implicated in Division Decisions

July 29, 2014 11:37 am | News | Comments

Researchers have identified a mechanism that overrides the cells’ warning signals, enabling...

A New Look at Stomach Cancer

July 28, 2014 11:30 am | News | Comments

In a massive effort to catalog the molecular causes of stomach cancer, scientists have...

Total Darkness During the Night is a Key to Success of Breast Cancer Therapy

July 25, 2014 2:05 pm | News | Comments

Exposure to light at night, which shuts off nighttime production of the hormone melatonin,...

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Is Europe Putting Cancer Research at Risk?

July 25, 2014 1:53 pm | News | Comments

The European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO) has expressed concern that the proposed EU General Data Protection Regulation could make cancer research impossible and add a significant burden to both doctors and cancer patients.         

Viral Therapy Could Boost Limb-saving Cancer Treatment

July 22, 2014 2:52 pm | News | Comments

Viruses designed to target and kill cancer cells could boost the effectiveness of chemotherapy to the arms and legs and help avoid amputation. Scientists tested the effectiveness of a genetically engineered version of the virus used to vaccinate against smallpox. They found use of the virus alongside isolated limb perfusion chemotherapy was more effective in rats than either treatment on its own.

Metabolic Enzyme Stops Progression of Kidney Cancer

July 21, 2014 1:52 pm | News | Comments

In an analysis of metabolites used by the body to make fuel in normal and cancerous cells in human kidney tissue, a research team identified an enzyme that is key to applying the brakes on tumor growth.              

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New Gene Discovered that Stops the Spread of Deadly Cancer

July 18, 2014 2:01 pm | Videos | Comments

Scientists at the Salk Institute have identified a gene responsible for stopping the movement of cancer from the lungs to other parts of the body, indicating a new way to fight one of the world's deadliest cancers. By identifying the cause of this metastasis—which often happens quickly in lung cancer and results in a bleak survival rate—Salk scientists are able to explain why some tumors are more prone to spreading than others.

Researchers Uncover New Cancer Cell Vulnerability

July 18, 2014 12:52 pm | News | Comments

Researchers have uncovered a genetic vulnerability of cancer cells that express telomerase— an enzyme that drives their unchecked growth— and showed that telomerase-expressing cells depend upon a gene named p21 for their survival.      

Capturing Cancer: A Powerful New Technique for Early Diagnosis

July 15, 2014 11:53 am | News | Comments

In recent years, aggressive research and substantial financial investments have been directed at discovering pre-symptomatic indicators of cancer, known as biomarkers. But as lead author researchers at Arizona State University’s Biodesign Institute emphasize in a new study, the quest for cancer biomarkers has been stymied by a number of factors. They describe a new technique for early disease detection, which they call immunosignaturing.

Cannabis Compound Could Slow Tumor Growth

July 14, 2014 1:39 pm | News | Comments

Scientists at the University of East Anglia have shown how the main psychoactive ingredient in cannabis could reduce tumor growth in cancer patients. Research  reveals the existence of previously unknown signaling platforms which are responsible for the drug’s success in shrinking tumors. It is hoped that the findings could help develop a synthetic equivalent with anti-cancer properties.

Vitamin D Ups Bowel Cancer Survival

July 9, 2014 4:31 pm | News | Comments

Bowel cancer patients with high levels of vitamin D in their blood are more likely to survive the disease, a new study shows. Patients with the highest levels of vitamin D have half the risk of dying compared with those with the lowest levels, the findings reveal.

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New Mutations Found in Most Common Form of Lung Cancer

July 9, 2014 3:54 pm | News | Comments

Researchers have identified novel mutations in a well-known cancer-causing pathway in lung adenocarcinoma, the most common subtype of lung cancer. Knowledge of these genomic changes may expand the number of possible therapeutic targets for this disease and potentially identify a greater number of patients with treatable mutations because many potent cancer drugs that target these mutations already exist.

Low Doses of Arsenic Cause Cancer in Mice

July 8, 2014 11:50 am | News | Comments

Mice exposed to low doses of arsenic in drinking water, similar to what some people might consume, developed lung cancer, researchers have found. Arsenic is present in the environment as a naturally occurring substance or due to contamination from human activity.

New Discovery in Living Cell Signaling

July 7, 2014 3:05 pm | News | Comments

A breakthrough discovery into how living cells process and respond to chemical information could help advance the development of treatments for a large number of cancers and other cellular disorders that have been resistant to therapy. An international collaboration of researchers unlocked the secret behind the activation of the Ras family of proteins.

Blocking Cells’ Movement to Stop the Spread of Cancer

July 7, 2014 2:53 pm | News | Comments

Insights into how cells move through the body could lead to innovative techniques to stop cancer cells from spreading and causing secondary tumors, according to new UCL research. Scientists discovered that cells can change into an invasive, liquid-like state to readily navigate the narrow channels in our body.

First Cancer Immunotherapy for Dogs Developed

July 7, 2014 2:51 pm | News | Comments

A few therapies derived from human medicine are available for dogs, but a very successful form of therapy by which antibodies inhibit tumor growth has not yet been available for animals. Now, scientists have developed, for the first time, antibodies to treat cancer in dogs.

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High Cholesterol Linked to Breast Cancer Risk

July 7, 2014 11:57 am | News | Comments

An association between high blood cholesterol and breast cancer has been found in a study of more than 1 million patients over a 14-year time period in the UK.                          

Pseudogenes May Provide Clearer Understanding of Biomarkers

July 7, 2014 11:36 am | News | Comments

Researchers completed a study that generated pseudogene expression profiles in 2,808 patient samples representing seven cancer types. The results indicated that the science of pseudogene expression analysis may very well play a key role in explaining how cancer occurs.

Scientists Find Key Piece in Brain Tumor Puzzle

July 7, 2014 11:22 am | News | Comments

Scientists have shown that a member of the protein family known as SUMO (small ubiquitin-like modifier) is a key to why tumor cells multiply uncontrollably, especially in the case of glioblastoma.                

Proton Therapy Has Advantages Over IMRT

July 3, 2014 8:30 am | Videos | Comments

A new study by radiation oncologists has found that proton beam therapy significantly improved disease free survival and tumor control when compared to IMRT in a variety of advanced head and neck cancers.               

Upending a Cancer Dogma

July 2, 2014 1:30 pm | News | Comments

Researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine say a protein essential to regulating cell cycle progression – the process of cell division and replication – activates a key tumor suppressor, rather than inactivating it as previously thought.

Treasure Trove of Genes Key to Kidney Cancer

July 2, 2014 9:24 am | Videos | Comments

A genomic analysis of clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC), the most common form of kidney cancer, from 72 patients has uncovered 31 genes that are key to development, growth and spread of the cancer, according to researchers.      

Four in Ten Pancreatic Cancers Could be Prevented by Lifestyle Changes

July 1, 2014 11:49 am | News | Comments

Almost 40 percent of pancreatic cancers– one of the deadliest forms of cancer– could be avoided in the UK through maintaining a healthy weight and not smoking, according to new research.                   

Cancer Risk: Aspirin and Smoking Affect Aging of Genes

July 1, 2014 11:23 am | News | Comments

The risk of developing cancer increases with age. Factors like smoking and regular aspirin use also affect the risk of cancer—although in the opposite sense. Researchers from the University of Basel were now able to show that aspirin use and smoking both influence aging processes of the female genome that are connected to colorectal cancer.

Diabolical Duo: Breast Cancer Gene Needs Partner to Grow

June 27, 2014 1:36 pm | News | Comments

A new study has revealed that the gene Metadherin— which is implicated in promoting the spread of breast cancer tumors— only stimulates tumor growth when the protein made by the gene interacts with a second protein known as SND1.      

Continued Use of Low-dose Aspirin May Lower Pancreatic Cancer Risk

June 26, 2014 1:02 pm | News | Comments

The longer a person took low-dose aspirin, the lower their risk for developing pancreatic cancer, according to a recently published study. Men and women who took low-dose aspirin regularly had 48 percent reduction in their risk for developing pancreatic cancer. Protection ranged from 39 percent reduction in risk for those who took low-dose aspirin for six years or less, to 60 percent reduction for those who took it for more than 10 years.

3-D Mammograms May Find More Breast Cancer

June 24, 2014 5:19 pm | by Lindsey Tanner - AP Medical Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

3-D mammograms may be better at finding cancer than regular scans, a large study suggests, although whether that means saving more lives isn't known. The study involved almost half a million breast scans, with more than one-third of them using relatively new 3-D imaging along with conventional scans.

Cancer Chain in the Membrane

June 24, 2014 1:50 pm | Videos | Comments

Supercomputer simulations have shown that clusters of a protein linked to cancer warp cell membranes, according to scientists at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth) Medical School. This research on these protein clusters, or aggregates as scientists call them, could help guide design of new anticancer drugs.

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