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Revealing the Root Causes of Alzheimer’s, Other Diseases

October 31, 2014 11:43 am | News | Comments

In the 1980s, researchers discovered vaults, naturally occurring nanoparticles that are composed mostly of proteins and number in the thousands inside every cell of the body. Now, data suggests that polyribosomes work like 3-D printers to both create and link together proteins and correctly form them into vaults.

Lab-made 'Ribozyme' Could Explain Origins of Life

October 30, 2014 12:45 pm | News | Comments

Mimicking natural evolution in a test tube, scientists have devised an enzyme with a...

First Human Stomach Tissues Generated in Lab

October 30, 2014 12:24 pm | Videos | Comments

Scientists used pluripotent stem cells to generate functional, three-dimensional human...

The Skin Cancer Selfie

October 29, 2014 1:02 pm | Videos | Comments

If melanoma, the deadliest form of skin cancer, is caught early enough it is almost always...

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Imaging the Genome

October 28, 2014 3:10 pm | News | Comments

A new study has allowed researchers to peer into unexplored regions of the genome and understand for the first time the role played by more than 250 genes key to cell growth and development.                 

Mathematical Models Can Predict Cellular Processes

October 28, 2014 2:34 pm | News | Comments

A multi-institutional, international team of researchers studied cells found in breast and other types of connective tissue and discovered new information about cell transitions that take place during wound healing and cancer.          

Researchers Observe Brain Development in Utero

October 27, 2014 2:03 pm | Videos | Comments

New investigation methods using functional magnetic resonance tomography (fMRT) offer insights into fetal brain development. These in vivo observations will uncover different stages of the brain's development.              

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Tackling Blindness, Deafness Through Neuroengineering

October 22, 2014 2:26 pm | News | Comments

The Bertarelli Program in Translational Neuroscience and Neuroengineering, a collaborative program between Harvard Medical School and the École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL) in Switzerland, has announced a new set of grants worth $3.6 million for five research projects.

Skin Patch May Replace Syringe for Disease Diagnosis

October 22, 2014 1:46 pm | News | Comments

Drawing blood and testing it is standard practice for many medical diagnostics. As a less painful alternative, scientists are developing skin patches that could one day replace the syringe.                  

Fairness is in the Brain

October 20, 2014 12:18 pm | News | Comments

Ever wondered how people figure out what is fair? Look to the brain for the answer. According to a new study, people appreciate fairness in much the same way as they appreciate money for themselves, and also that fairness is not necessarily that everybody gets the same income.

Scientific Evidence Does Not Support 'Brain Game' Claims

October 20, 2014 11:39 am | News | Comments

A group of scholars issued a statement skeptical about the effectiveness of so-called "brain game" products, citing that the scientific track record does not support the claims that these games actually help older adults boost their mental powers.

New Front in War on Alzheimer’s, Other Protein-folding Diseases

October 17, 2014 12:06 pm | News | Comments

A surprise discovery that overturns decades of thinking about how the body fixes proteins that come unraveled greatly expands opportunities for therapies to prevent diseases such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s, which have been linked to the accumulation of improperly folded proteins in the brain.

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Babies’ Hearts May Beat Path to Heart Attack Treatments

October 17, 2014 11:50 am | Videos | Comments

The seemingly miraculous power of babies’ hearts to repair themselves after being injured has spurred a research team to investigate if this ability can be harnessed for new heart attack treatments.               

Explaining More About Airway Closure During Asthma Attacks

October 16, 2014 2:28 pm | News | Comments

In acute asthma, various triggers, including viral illnesses and aeroallergens, can cause acute narrowing of the airways leading to a life-threatening respiratory crisis and sometimes death. Researchers have identified a novel factor that puts the brakes on airway smooth-muscle contraction relevant to asthma.

Tiny, Sound-Powered Chip May Serve as Medical Device

October 15, 2014 2:43 pm | News | Comments

Using ultrasound to deliver power wirelessly, researchers are working on a new generation of medical devices that would be planted deep inside the body to monitor illness, deliver therapies and relieve pain.             

Cellular 'Snooze Button' Advances Cancer, Biofuel Research

October 14, 2014 11:48 am | News | Comments

The discovery of a cellular snooze button has allowed a team of scientists to potentially improve biofuel production and offer insight on the early stages of cancer.                         

Bioinspired Coating Repels Blood, Bacteria from Medical Devices

October 13, 2014 2:03 pm | News | Comments

A team of scientists and engineers developed a new surface coating for medical devices using materials already approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The coating repelled blood from more than 20 medically relevant substrates the team tested.

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Manipulating Memory with Light

October 10, 2014 11:30 am | News | Comments

Just look into the light: not quite, but researchers have used light to erase specific memories in mice, and proved a basic theory of how different parts of the brain work together to retrieve episodic memories.            

Bioprinted 3-D Device Aids Blood Detoxification

October 8, 2014 10:45 am | by Skip Derra | Articles | Comments

A team of engineers has successfully developed a three-dimensional-printed device, which mimics the operation of the liver to remove dangerous toxins from the blood.                         

A Needle in a Haystack: Technique Spots Stem Cells in Bone Marrow

October 7, 2014 1:27 pm | News | Comments

In a new study that should make it easier to develop stem-cell-based therapies, a team of researchers has identified three physical characteristics of MSCs that can distinguish them from other immature cells found in the bone marrow.     

Scientists Develop Barcoding Tool for Stem Cells

October 6, 2014 11:46 am | News | Comments

A project to develop a barcoding and tracking system for tissue stem cells has revealed previously unrecognized features of normal blood production: New data suggests, surprisingly, that the billions of blood cells that we produce each day are made not by blood stem cells, but rather their less pluripotent descendants, called progenitor cells.

Height 'Almost Completely Determined' by Genetics

October 6, 2014 11:26 am | News | Comments

The largest genome-wide association study (GWAS) to date, involving more than 300 institutions and more than 250,000 subjects, roughly doubles the number of known gene regions influencing height to more than 400.           

New Discovery in the Microbiology of Serious Human Disease

October 3, 2014 2:41 pm | News | Comments

Previously undiscovered secrets of how human cells interact with a bacterium which causes a serious human disease have been revealed in new research by microbiologists.                        

Scientists Discover Gene Controlling Muscle Fate

September 30, 2014 2:11 pm | News | Comments

Scientists have moved a step closer to improving medical science through research involving muscle manipulation of fruit flies. They discovered in the flight muscles of Drosophila a new regulator of a process called alternative splicing.     

Ancient Human Genome Throws New Light on Origins

September 29, 2014 12:31 pm | News | Comments

What can DNA from the skeleton of a man who lived 2,330 years ago in the southernmost tip of Africa tell us about ourselves as humans? A great deal when his DNA profile is one of the "earliest diverged"– oldest in genetic terms– found to-date in a region where modern humans are believed to have originated roughly 200,000 years ago.

U.S. Issues New Rules for University Germ Research

September 25, 2014 8:30 am | by Lauran Neergaard - AP Medical Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

The Obama administration is tightening oversight of high-stakes scientific research involving dangerous germs that could raise biosecurity concerns, imposing new safety rules on universities and other institutions where such work is done.   

Diabetes in Need of New Screening, Management Approach

September 24, 2014 2:39 pm | News | Comments

Doctors at three leading research institutions and the American Diabetes Association report that treating patients with prediabetes as if they had diabetes could help prevent or delay the most severe complications associated with this chronic disease.

Grant Will Help Study Link Between Blueberries, Bone Health

September 23, 2014 2:42 pm | News | Comments

A $3.7 million grant will allow Purdue University researchers to study how blueberries reduce bone loss in postmenopausal women. The project begins Sept. 30 under a five-year grant from the National Institutes of Health's National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine.

How Gene Expression Affects Facial Expressions

September 22, 2014 12:13 pm | News | Comments

A person’s face is the first thing that others see, and much remains unknown about how it forms— or malforms— during early development. New research has begun to unwind these mysteries.                   

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