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Preventing Memory Problems Caused by Sleep Deprivation

November 19, 2014 1:39 pm | News | Comments

In a new study, scientists found that a particular set of cells in a small region of the brain are responsible for memory problems after sleep loss. By selectively increasing levels of a signaling molecule in these cells, the researchers prevented mice from having memory deficits.

New Laser Therapy Helps Slow Macular Degeneration

November 19, 2014 10:37 am | News | Comments

A new, low impact low energy laser treatment for patients with early age-related macular...

Cleveland Clinic Performs Second Face Transplant

November 19, 2014 10:14 am | News | Comments

Cleveland Clinic surgeons have replaced nearly the entire face of a middle-aged man...

Spotted: First Evidence of 'Local' Clock in the Brain

November 14, 2014 12:37 pm | News | Comments

In a new study looking at mice, researchers have investigated a local clock found in...

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Marching to Our Own Sequences

November 14, 2014 11:54 am | News | Comments

A new study from geneticists has found that the DNA replication plan— including where the origin points are and in what order DNA segments get copied- varies from person to person.                    

How Adult Fly Testes Keep from Changing Into Ovaries

November 14, 2014 11:08 am | News | Comments

New research in flies shows how cells in adult reproductive organs maintain their sexual identity. The study also identified a mutation that can switch the cells’ sexual identity.                     

In Chimpanzees, Long-term Bullying Makes More Babies

November 14, 2014 10:38 am | Videos | Comments

In a long-term study of interactions between chimpanzees in the famous Gombe National Park in Tanzania, researchers have found that males who consistently bully females tend to father more babies with their victims.          

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New Patent May Advance Stem Cell Therapeutics

November 13, 2014 10:29 am | News | Comments

Ki-Bum Lee has developed patent-pending technology that may overcome one of the critical barriers to harnessing the full therapeutic potential of stem cells.                            

'Supporting' Ear Cells Hold Potential in Hearing Loss

November 13, 2014 10:09 am | News | Comments

There’s a cast of characters deep inside your ears- many kinds of tiny cells working together to allow you to hear. Hair cells, the lead actors, play the crucial role. But new research shows that when it comes to restoring lost hearing ability, the spotlight may fall on some of the ear’s supporting actors.

The Backwards Brain

November 13, 2014 10:01 am | News | Comments

Humans, like many animals, are accustomed to seeing objects pass behind us as we go forward. Moving backwards feels unnatural. In a new study, scientists reveal that moving forward actually trains the brain to perceive the world normally.    

6 Health-improving Trends in Science

November 13, 2014 9:52 am | News | Comments

Researchers are collaborating and innovating in ways that are transforming health care as we know it. They're also looking ahead at the trends and influences that are reshaping and accelerating translational science.           

Controlling Genes with Thoughts

November 12, 2014 8:30 am | News | Comments

Researchers have developed the first gene network to be operated via brainwaves. Depending on the user’s thoughts, it can produce various amounts of a desired molecule.                       

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Enriched Environments Hold Promise for Brain Injury Patients

November 12, 2014 8:30 am | News | Comments

A new study from Tel Aviv University found that an "enriched environment"— specially enhanced surroundings— led to rehabilitation of mice following traumatic brain injury.                       

Some Plants Regenerate by Duplicating DNA

November 12, 2014 8:30 am | News | Comments

When munched by grazing animals (or mauled by scientists in the lab), some herbaceous plants overcompensate– producing more plant matter and becoming more fertile than they otherwise would. Scientists say they now know how these plants accomplish this feat of regeneration.

How Cartilage Cells Sense Forceful Injury

November 11, 2014 12:30 pm | News | Comments

Scientists have come a step closer to understanding how cartilage senses injury-causing mechanical strain at the cellular level: a pair of channels that work together to cause cartilage cells to die off in droves.           

The Brain’s 'Inner GPS' Gets Dismantled

November 11, 2014 12:22 pm | News | Comments

Imagine being able to recognize your car as your own but never being able to remember where you parked it. Researchers have induced this all-too-common human experience– or a close version of it– permanently in rats.           

Cat Genome Reveals Clues to Domestication

November 11, 2014 11:54 am | News | Comments

Cats and humans have shared the same households for at least 9,000 years, but we still know very little about how our feline friends became domesticated. An analysis of the cat genome reveals some surprising clues.           

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Initiative to Highlight Strong Links Between Sugar, Disease

November 11, 2014 11:04 am | News | Comments

Researchers have launched SugarScience, a groundbreaking research and education initiative designed to highlight the most authoritative scientific findings on added sugar and its impact on health.               

The Power of the Power Nap

November 10, 2014 1:50 pm | News | Comments

For hibernating mammals, the pre-winter months are a race against time to accumulate enough energy reserves to last until spring. Offspring born late in the year have much less time to achieve this. New research shows that power-napping can help late-born garden dormice overcome these unfavorable odds.

Identical Genes Don’t Hinder Bacteria's Ability to Adapt

November 7, 2014 11:30 am | News | Comments

Bacteria in colonies don’t reproduce sexually and are genetically identical, yet they can prepare in advance for changing environmental conditions. Researchers have shown that bacteria carry out this strategy by producing cells with differing amounts of specific proteins that govern their response to chemical signals.

Migration Negation

November 7, 2014 11:21 am | News | Comments

Most cancer deaths occur because of metastasis, yet progress in preventing and treating migratory cancer cells has been slow. Scientists have now identified a cellular culprit that should help researchers better understand how metastasis begins.  

Eye-scan Analysis Can Predict Advance of Macular Degeneration

November 6, 2014 2:07 pm | News | Comments

Scientists have found a new way to forecast which patients with age-related macular degeneration are likely to suffer from the most debilitating form of the disease.                         

The Genesis of Genitalia

November 6, 2014 1:12 pm | News | Comments

When it comes to genitalia, nature enjoys variety. Snakes and lizards have two. Birds and people have one. And despite noteworthy contrasts, these structures are functionally analogous and express similar genes. So how do these equivalent structures arise from different starting tissues?  

Study Replicates Human Brain-to-brain Connection

November 6, 2014 1:03 pm | Videos | Comments

Researchers have successfully replicated a direct brain-to-brain connection between pairs of people as part of a scientific study following the team’s initial demonstration a year ago.                   

New Tool Could Help Reshape the Limits of Synthetic Biology

November 5, 2014 12:44 pm | News | Comments

Geneticists report they have developed a novel tool— dubbed “the telomerator”— that could redefine the limits of synthetic biology and advance how successfully living things can be engineered or constructed in the laboratory based on an organism’s genetic, chemical base-pair structure.

System Helps Move Toward Genetic Editing

November 4, 2014 3:06 pm | News | Comments

As potential next-generation therapeutics and research tools, few life sciences technologies hold more promise than genome-editing proteins— molecules that can be programmed to alter specific genes to treat or perhaps cure genetic diseases.    

Making Age Reversal Real

November 4, 2014 1:23 pm | Videos | Comments

Professor David Sinclair has some complaints about the human lifespan. It’s too short, for a start. But, “it doesn’t have to be this way,” he told an audience on Monday.                       

Researchers Reconstruct Early Stages of Embryo Development

November 4, 2014 12:36 pm | Videos | Comments

Researchers have managed to reconstruct the early stage of mammalian development using embryonic stem cells, showing that a critical mass of cells is needed for the cells to being self-organizing into the correct structure for an embryo to form. 

'Wimpy' Antibody May Protect Against Kidney Disease

November 3, 2014 1:32 pm | News | Comments

An antibody abundant in mice and previously thought to offer poor assistance in fighting against infection may actually play a key role in keeping immune responses in check and preventing more serious self-inflicted forms of kidney disease, researchers say.

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