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Ancient Human Genome Throws New Light on Origins

September 29, 2014 12:31 pm | News | Comments

What can DNA from the skeleton of a man who lived 2,330 years ago in the southernmost tip of Africa tell us about ourselves as humans? A great deal when his DNA profile is one of the "earliest diverged"– oldest in genetic terms– found to-date in a region where modern humans are believed to have originated roughly 200,000 years ago.

U.S. Issues New Rules for University Germ Research

September 25, 2014 8:30 am | by Lauran Neergaard - AP Medical Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

The Obama administration is tightening oversight of high-stakes scientific research involving...

Diabetes in Need of New Screening, Management Approach

September 24, 2014 2:39 pm | News | Comments

Doctors at three leading research institutions and the American Diabetes Association...

Grant Will Help Study Link Between Blueberries, Bone Health

September 23, 2014 2:42 pm | News | Comments

A $3.7 million grant will allow Purdue University researchers to study how blueberries...

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How Gene Expression Affects Facial Expressions

September 22, 2014 12:13 pm | News | Comments

A person’s face is the first thing that others see, and much remains unknown about how it forms— or malforms— during early development. New research has begun to unwind these mysteries.                   

New Discovery About 3-D Shape Processing in the Brain

September 19, 2014 8:30 am | News | Comments

While previous studies of the brain suggest that processing of objects and place occur in very different locations, a research team has found that they are closely related.                       

One-minute Point-of-care Anemia Test Shows Promise

September 17, 2014 12:54 pm | News | Comments

A simple point-of-care testing device for anemia could provide more rapid diagnosis of the common blood disorder and allow inexpensive at-home self-monitoring of persons with chronic forms of the disease.             

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Brain Scans Forecast Early Reading Difficulties

September 16, 2014 2:31 pm | News | Comments

Researchers have used brain scans to predict how young children learn to read, giving clinicians a possible tool to spot children with dyslexia and other reading difficulties before they experience reading challenges.         

'Biospleen' is a Blood Cleanser for Sepsis

September 15, 2014 1:21 pm | News | Comments

Things can go downhill fast when a patient has sepsis, a life-threatening condition in which bacteria or fungi multiply in the blood—often too fast for antibiotics to help. A new device inspired by the human spleen may radically transform the way doctors treat sepsis.

Researchers Find Final Pieces to Circadian Clock Puzzle

September 15, 2014 12:59 pm | News | Comments

Researchers have discovered how two genes– Period and Cryptochrome– keep the circadian clocks in all human cells in time and in proper rhythm with the 24-hour day, as well as the seasons.                  

Cells Put Off Protein Production During Times of Stress

September 11, 2014 3:26 pm | News | Comments

Researchers have shown that a stressed cell recognizes the buildup of misfolded proteins and responds by reshuffling its workload, much like a stressed out employee might temporarily move papers from an overflowing inbox into a junk drawer.   

New Defense Mechanism Against Viruses Discovered

September 11, 2014 2:05 pm | News | Comments

Researchers have discovered that a known quality control mechanism in human, animal and plant cells is active against viruses. They think it might represent one of the oldest defense mechanisms against viruses in evolutionary history.      

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Ebola’s Ripple Effects

September 11, 2014 12:04 pm | Videos | Comments

The race to stamp out West Africa’s Ebola epidemic is not just about saving lives. It’s also about stemming an assault on society that could include food shortages and mass migration, morphing from a medical emergency into a broad humanitarian crisis.

Lady Baboons With Guy Pals Live Longer

September 10, 2014 11:19 am | News | Comments

Numerous studies have linked social interaction to improved health and survival in humans, and new research confirms that the same is true for baboons.                             

In Directing Stem Cells, Study Shows Context Matters

September 8, 2014 3:57 pm | News | Comments

Figuring out how blank slate stem cells decide which kind of cell they want to be when they grow up— a muscle cell, a bone cell, a neuron— has been no small task for science. Now, a team of researchers has added a new wrinkle to the cell differentiation equation.

Single Cell Smashes, Rebuilds Its Own Genome

September 8, 2014 3:52 pm | News | Comments

Life can be so intricate and novel that even a single cell can pack a few surprises, according to a new study. The pond-dwelling, single-celled organism Oxytricha trifallax has the remarkable ability to break its own DNA into nearly a quarter-million pieces and rapidly reassemble those pieces when it's time to mate, the study says.

Oxidized LDL Might Actually be 'Good Guy'

September 5, 2014 3:24 pm | News | Comments

A team of investigators has made a thought-provoking discovery about a type of cholesterol previously believed to be a "bad guy" in the development of heart disease and other conditions.                    

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Nature or Nurture? It’s All About the Message

September 5, 2014 1:53 pm | News | Comments

Were Albert Einstein and Leonardo da Vinci born brilliant or did they acquire their intelligence through effort? No one knows for sure, but telling people the latter– that hard work trumps genes– causes instant changes in the brain and may make them more willing to strive for success, indicates a new study.

Messenger Molecules a Part of Arthritis Puzzle

September 4, 2014 2:05 pm | News | Comments

The way in which some cells alter their behavior at the onset of osteoarthritis has been identified for the first time. Researchers found that changes in the rate at which molecules in joint cartilage called mRNA are created and destroyed are fundamental to causing this change in behavior.

A ‘Clear’ Choice for Clearing 3-D Cell Cultures

September 3, 2014 2:36 pm | News | Comments

Scientists have hailed recent demonstrations of chemical technologies for making animal tissues see-through, but a new study is the first to evaluate three such technologies side-by-side for use with engineered 3-D tissue cultures. 

Memory-boosting Sensor Strengthens Synaptic Connections

September 3, 2014 2:02 pm | News | Comments

How does short-term memory happen at the molecular level? New research has identified a calcium sensor that helps strengthen the connections between brain cells.                           

Prominent Japan Stem Cell Center to Undergo Changes

September 2, 2014 3:55 pm | by Cynthia Fox | Articles | Comments

Riken Center for Developmental Biology (CDB), the prominent Japan institute where Haruko Obokata was found to commit misconduct on stem cell papers, will be halved, according to a Riken representative.              

Surprising New Role for Calcium in Sensing Pain

September 2, 2014 1:54 pm | Videos | Comments

When you accidentally touch a hot oven, you rapidly pull your hand away. Although scientists know the basic neural circuits involved in sensing and responding to such painful stimuli, they are still sorting out the molecular players. Now, researchers have made a surprising discovery about the role of a key molecule involved in pain.

Chefs, Breeders Pair Up to Produce Tastier Veggies

September 1, 2014 4:23 pm | by M.l. Johnson - Associated Press - Associated Press | News | Comments

There's a good chance that many of the suddenly trendy vegetables that foodies latch on to in the next decade will benefit from research at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.                     

From Nose to Knee: Engineered Cartilage Regenerates Joints

August 29, 2014 8:30 am | News | Comments

Researchers report that cells taken from the nasal septum are able to adapt to the environment of the knee joint and can thus repair articular cartilage defects. Read more...                     

Fossil Provides Earliest Evidence of Animals with Muscles

August 28, 2014 8:30 am | News | Comments

An unusual new fossil discovery of one of the earliest animals on earth may also provide the oldest evidence of muscle tissue– the bundles of cells that make movement in animals possible.                  

Technology May ID Strains in Body Tissues Before Injuries Occur

August 27, 2014 1:05 pm | Videos | Comments

Researchers have developed algorithms to identify weak spots in tendons, muscles and bones prone to tearing or breaking. The technology one day may help pinpoint minor strains and tiny injuries in the body’s tissues long before bigger problems occur.

Gut Bacteria Protects Against Food Allergies

August 26, 2014 2:30 pm | News | Comments

The presence of Clostridia, a common class of gut bacteria, protects against food allergies, a new study in mice finds. The discovery points toward probiotic therapies for this so-far untreatable condition.           

Vision Problems Can Dim Life Expectancy

August 26, 2014 2:10 pm | News | Comments

Older adults losing vision as they age are more likely to face an increased mortality risk, according to new research. The researchers analyzed data from the Salisbury Eye Evaluation study that tracked the vision health of 2,520 older adults, ages 65 to 84.

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