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Brain Size Linked to Parental Duties in Fish

August 20, 2014 12:06 pm | News | Comments

Male stickleback fish that protect their young have bigger brains than counterparts - male white sticklebacks, which do not tend to their offspring - a new study found.                      

Engineering New Bone Growth

August 19, 2014 12:07 pm | News | Comments

Chemical engineers have devised a new implantable tissue scaffold coated with bone growth...

Breakthrough in the Fight Against Drug-resistant Superbugs

August 19, 2014 11:51 am | News | Comments

Scientists have made a breakthrough in the fight against the most resistant hospital superbugs...

Bats Bolster Brain Hypothesis, Maybe Technology, Too

August 15, 2014 11:11 am | News | Comments

Decades of research on how bats use echolocation to keep a focus on their targets not only lends...

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Single Enzyme is Necessary for Development of Diabetes

August 15, 2014 11:04 am | News | Comments

An enzyme called 12-LO promotes the obesity-induced oxidative stress in the pancreatic cells that leads to pre-diabetes, and diabetes. 12-LO’s enzymatic action is the last step in the production of certain small molecules that harm the cell, according to a team from Indiana University School of Medicine. The findings will enable the development of drugs that can interfere with this enzyme, preventing or even reversing diabetes.

Scientists Pinpoint Gene Likely to Promote Childhood Cancers

August 12, 2014 2:28 pm | News | Comments

Researchers at the Children’s Medical Center Research Institute at UT Southwestern (CRI) have identified a gene that contributes to the development of several childhood cancers, in a study conducted with mice designed to model the cancers. If the findings prove to be applicable to humans, the research could lead to new strategies for targeting certain childhood cancers at a molecular level.

Synthetic Molecule Makes Cancer Self-Destruct

August 12, 2014 2:21 pm | News | Comments

Researchers from The University of Texas at Austin and five other institutions have created a molecule that can cause cancer cells to self-destruct by ferrying sodium and chloride ions into the cancer cells. These synthetic ion transporters confirm a two-decades-old hypothesis that could point the way to new anticancer drugs while also benefiting patients with cystic fibrosis.

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An Easier Way to Manipulate Malaria Genes

August 12, 2014 2:06 pm | News | Comments

Plasmodium falciparum, the parasite that causes malaria, has proven notoriously resistant to scientists’ efforts to study its genetics. It can take up to a year to determine the function of a single gene, which has slowed efforts to develop new, more targeted drugs and vaccines.

Hijacking the Brain's Blood Supply: Tumor Discovery Could Aid Treatment

August 12, 2014 1:55 pm | News | Comments

Dangerous brain tumors hijack the brain’s existing blood supply throughout their progression, by growing only within narrow potential spaces between and along the brain’s thousands of small blood vessels, new research shows for the first time.

Editing HPV's Genes to Kill Cervical Cancer Cells

August 11, 2014 2:13 pm | News | Comments

Researchers have hijacked a defense system normally used by bacteria to fend off viral infections and redirected it against the human papillomavirus (HPV), the virus that causes cervical, head and neck, and other cancers.Using the genome editing tool known as CRISPR, the Duke University researchers were able to selectively destroy two viral genes responsible for the growth and survival of cervical carcinoma cells.

Scientists Unlock Key to Blood Vessel Formation

August 11, 2014 2:09 pm | News | Comments

Scientists from the University of Leeds have discovered a gene that plays a vital role in blood vessel formation, research which adds to our knowledge of how early life develops. The discovery could also lead to greater understanding of how to treat cardiovascular diseases and cancer.

Like Cling Wrap, New Biomaterial Can Coat Burn Wounds and Block Infection

August 11, 2014 2:01 pm | News | Comments

Wrapping wound dressings around fingers and toes can be tricky, but for burn victims, guarding them against infection is critical. Today, scientists are reporting the development of novel, ultrathin coatings called nanosheets that can cling to the body’s most difficult-to-protect contours and keep bacteria at bay.

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Solving a Sticky Problem with Fetal Surgery Using Glue Inspired by Sandcastle Worm

August 11, 2014 1:48 pm | News | Comments

In creating an adhesive patterned after glue produced by the lowly underwater sandcastle worm, researchers are reporting today that they may have solved the problem of premature births that sometimes result from fetal surgery. It also could open up numerous opportunities to safely perform more complex fetal surgeries in the future.

Making Cashews Safer for Those with Allergies

August 11, 2014 1:37 pm | News | Comments

For the millions of adults and children in the U.S. who have to shun nuts to avoid an allergic reaction, help could be on the way. Scientists are now developing a method to process cashews—and potentially other nuts—that could make them safer to eat for people who are allergic to them.

Can People with Type 2 Diabetes Live Longer?

August 8, 2014 1:26 pm | News | Comments

A large-scale University-led study involving more than 180,000 people shows that patients treated with a drug widely prescribed for type 2 diabetes can live longer than people without the condition. The findings indicate that a drug known as metformin, used to control glucose levels in the body and already known to exhibit anticancer properties, could offer prognostic and prophylactic benefits to people without diabetes.

Cell Signaling Pathway Linked to Obesity, Type 2 Diabetes

August 8, 2014 1:19 pm | News | Comments

A Purdue University study shows that Notch signaling, a key biological pathway tied to development and cell communication, also plays an important role in the onset of obesity and Type 2 diabetes, a discovery that offers new targets for treatment.

'Normal' Bacteria Vital for Keeping Intestinal Lining Intact

August 7, 2014 4:24 pm | by Einstein | News | Comments

Scientists at Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University have found that bacteria that aid in digestion help keep the intestinal lining intact. The findings could yield new therapies for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and a wide range of other disorders.

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Cell Mechanics May Hold Key to How Cancer Spreads and Recurs

August 7, 2014 2:34 pm | News | Comments

Cancer cells that break away from tumors to go looking for a new home may prefer to settle into a soft bed. Some particularly enterprising cancer cells can cause a cancer to spread to other organs, called metastasis, or evade treatment to resurface after a patient is thought to be in remission. A team found that these so-called tumor-repopulating cells may lurk quietly in stiffer cellular environments, but thrive in a softer space.

Part of the Brain Stays "Youthful" into Older Age

August 7, 2014 1:52 pm | News | Comments

At least one part of the human brain may be able to process information the same way in older age as it does in the prime of life, according to new research conducted at the University of Adelaide. A study compared the ability of 60 older and younger people to respond to visual and non-visual stimuli in order to measure their "spatial attention" skills.

“Treatments Waiting to be Discovered” Inside New Database

August 6, 2014 2:00 pm | News | Comments

Your genes are blueprints for proteins, and molecules called microRNA can help to determine how often these genetic blueprints are manufactured into proteins. Researchers often ask what microRNA regulates a gene related to disease. Or what gene is regulated by a microRNA found in sick patients? The answers to these questions could help doctors and researchers manipulate protein levels in the body that cause disease.

Researchers Boost Insect Aggression by Altering Brain Metabolism

August 6, 2014 1:36 pm | Videos | Comments

Scientists report they can crank up insect aggression simply by interfering with a basic metabolic pathway in the insect brain. Their study, of fruit flies and honey bees, shows a direct, causal link between brain metabolism (how the brain generates the energy it needs to function) and aggression.

Biology Made Simpler with "Clear" Tissues

August 6, 2014 1:22 pm | News | Comments

In general, our knowledge of biology—and much of science in general—is limited by our ability to actually see things. Researchers who study developmental problems and disease, in particular, are often limited by their inability to look inside an organism to figure out exactly what went wrong and when. Now, thanks to techniques developed at Caltech, scientists can see through tissues, organs, and even an entire body. 

Enhancing Biofuel Yields from Biomass with Novel New Method

August 5, 2014 2:15 pm | News | Comments

A team of researchers, led by Professor Charles E. Wyman, at the University of California, Riverside’s Bourns College of Engineering have developed a versatile, relatively non-toxic, and efficient way to convert raw agricultural and forestry residues and other plant matter, known as lignocellulosic biomass, into biofuels and chemicals.

Study Predicts Hepatitis C Will Become a Rare Disease in 22 Years

August 5, 2014 2:06 pm | News | Comments

Effective new drugs and screening would make hepatitis C a rare disease by 2036, according to a computer simulation conducted by The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center and the University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health.

New DNA Analysis Technique Promises Speedier Diagnosis

August 5, 2014 2:01 pm | News | Comments

Researchers have achieved a technical breakthrough that should result in speedier diagnosis of cancer and various pre-natal conditions. The key discovery lies in a new tool that allows researchers to load long strands of DNA into a tunable nanoscale imaging chamber in ways that maintain their structural identity and under conditions that are similar to those found in the human body.

Smart Bacteria Help Each Other Survive

August 5, 2014 1:47 pm | News | Comments

The body’s assailants are cleverer than previously thought. New research from Lund University in Sweden shows for the first time how bacteria in the airways can help each other replenish vital iron. The bacteria thereby increase their chances of survival, which can happen at the expense of the person’s health.

Clues to the Aging of Tendons Unlocked

August 5, 2014 1:33 pm | News | Comments

University of Liverpool scientists have examined the mechanisms that cause ageing in the tendons of horses, opening up the possibility of better treatment for humans. It has been understood for many years that tendons are highly prone to injury and that this likelihood increases as they age.  Why this happens, is currently poorly understood.

Mosaicism: Study Clarifies Parents as Source of New Mutations

July 31, 2014 3:36 pm | News | Comments

Scientists have long speculated that mosaicism plays a bigger role in the transmission of rare disease mutations than is currently known. Now, a study sheds new light on the frequency of mosaicism in genomic disorders and its influence on recurrence risk.

Engineering a Protein to Prevent Brain Damage from Toxic Agents

July 31, 2014 3:21 pm | News | Comments

Research at New York University is paving the way for a breakthrough that may prevent brain damage in civilians and military troops exposed to poisonous chemicals—particularly those in pesticides and chemical weapons. The research outlines the advancement in detoxifying organophosphates, which are compounds commonly used in pesticides and warfare agents.

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