Advertisement
Academia News
Subscribe to Academia News

The Lead

Total Darkness During the Night is a Key to Success of Breast Cancer Therapy

July 25, 2014 2:05 pm | News | Comments

Exposure to light at night, which shuts off nighttime production of the hormone melatonin, renders breast cancer completely resistant to tamoxifen, a widely used breast cancer drug, says a new study by Tulane University School of Medicine cancer researchers.

Powerful HIV Antibodies May Require Assist from Second Antibody to Develop

July 25, 2014 1:40 pm | News | Comments

One strategy for developing a highly effective HIV vaccine is to learn how some HIV-infected...

New Imaging Agent Provides Better Picture of the Gut

July 25, 2014 1:36 pm | News | Comments

A multi-institutional team of researchers has developed a new nanoscale agent for imaging the...

Key Muscle Component's Atomic Structure Revealed

July 25, 2014 12:54 pm | News | Comments

In a new study, biophysicists describe– in minute detail- how actin filaments are stabilized at...

View Sample

FREE Email Newsletter

Monitoring the Rise and Fall of the Microbiome

July 25, 2014 12:23 pm | News | Comments

Trillions of bacteria live in each person’s digestive tract, but their role in human health is not well understood. To help shed light on the role of these bacteria, a team of researchers recently tracked fluctuations in the bacterial populations of two research subjects over a full year.

Dyes Used to Paint New Picture of Disease

July 24, 2014 2:12 pm | News | Comments

By using brightly hued dyes, George Mason University (GMU) researchers discovered an innovative way to reveal where proteins touch each other, possibly leading to new treatments for cancer, arthritis, heart disease, and even lung disease.

Study Links Autistic Behaviors to Enzyme

July 24, 2014 1:48 pm | News | Comments

Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is a genetic disorder that causes obsessive-compulsive and repetitive behaviors, and other behaviors on the autistic spectrum, as well as cognitive deficits. It is the most common inherited cause of mental impairment and the most common cause of autism. Now biomedical scientists at the University of California, Riverside have published a study that sheds light on the cause of autistic behaviors in FXS. 

Advertisement

Try, Try Again? Study Says No

July 23, 2014 11:00 am | News | Comments

In a new study, a team of researchers has found evidence for a factor that contributes to adults’ language difficulties: When learning certain elements of language, adults’ more highly developed cognitive skills actually get in the way.     

Human Platelets Generated in Bioreactor

July 23, 2014 10:47 am | News | Comments

Scientists have developed a scalable, next-generation platelet bioreactor to generate fully functional human platelets in vitro. The work might help address blood transfusion needs worldwide.                  

Unbreak My Heart

July 23, 2014 10:15 am | Videos | Comments

Researchers of the Max Planck Institute of Molecular Cell Biology and Genetics in Dresden report how they managed to capture detailed three-dimensional images of cardiac dynamics in zebrafish. The novel approach: They combine high-speed Selective Plane Illumination Microscopy (SPIM) and clever image processing to reconstruct multi-view movie stacks of the beating heart.

Potential New Flu Drugs Target Immune Response, Not Virus

July 22, 2014 2:59 pm | News | Comments

The seriousness of disease often results from the strength of immune response, rather than with the virus, itself. Turning down that response, rather than attacking the virus, might be a better way to reduce that severity. Researchers have taken the first step in doing that for the H7N9 influenza, and their work has led to identification of six potential therapeutics for this highly virulent strain.

Viral Therapy Could Boost Limb-saving Cancer Treatment

July 22, 2014 2:52 pm | News | Comments

Viruses designed to target and kill cancer cells could boost the effectiveness of chemotherapy to the arms and legs and help avoid amputation. Scientists tested the effectiveness of a genetically engineered version of the virus used to vaccinate against smallpox. They found use of the virus alongside isolated limb perfusion chemotherapy was more effective in rats than either treatment on its own.

Advertisement

Brain Waves Show Learning to Read Doesn’t End in Fourth Grade

July 22, 2014 2:43 pm | News | Comments

Teachers-in-training have long been taught that the fourth grade is when students stop learning to read and start reading to learn. But a new study tested the theory by analyzing brain waves and found that fourth-graders do not experience a change in automatic word processing. Instead, some types of word processing become automatic before fourth grade, while others don’t switch until after fifth.

Bacteria Swim with Bodies and Flagella

July 22, 2014 2:34 pm | News | Comments

Many bacteria swim using flagella, corkscrew-like appendages that push or pull bacterial cells like propellers. It had been assumed that the flagella do all the work during swimming, while the rest of the cell body is just along for the ride. But new research shows that in at least one species, the cell body is actively carving out a helical trajectory through the water that produces thrust and contributes to the organism's ability to swim.

New Trigger for Ovulation Could Make IVF Safer

July 21, 2014 12:34 pm | Videos | Comments

Researchers have successfully used a new and potentially safer method to stimulate ovulation in women undergoing IVF treatment. Twelve babies have been born after their mothers were given an injection of the natural hormone kisspeptin to make their eggs mature.

Squid Skin Protein Could Improve Biomedical Technologies

July 17, 2014 12:01 pm | News | Comments

The common pencil squid (Loliginidae) may hold the key to a new generation of medical technologies that could communicate more directly with the human body. UC Irvine materials science researchers have discovered that reflectin, a protein in the tentacled creature’s skin, can conduct positive electrical charges, or protons, making it a promising material for building biologically inspired devices.

Team Studies Immune Response of Asian Elephants Infected with a Human Disease

July 16, 2014 1:51 pm | News | Comments

Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the organism that causes tuberculosis in humans, also afflicts Asian elephants. Diagnosing and treating elephants with TB is a challenge, however, as little is known about how their immune systems respond to the infection. A new study begins to address this knowledge gap, and offers new tools for detecting and monitoring TB in captive elephants.

Advertisement

Babies’ Brains Rehearse Speech Before First Words

July 15, 2014 12:39 pm | News | Comments

Research in seven- and 11-month-old infants shows that speech sounds stimulate areas of the brain that coordinate and plan motor movements for speech. The study suggests that baby brains start laying down the groundwork of how to form words long before they actually begin to speak.

A-maize-ing Double Life of a Genome

July 15, 2014 12:06 pm | News | Comments

Early maize farmers selected for genes that improved the harvesting of sunlight, a new detailed study of how plants use 'doubles' of their genomes reveals. The findings could help current efforts to improve existing crop varieties. Oxford University researchers captured a 'genetic snapshot' of maize as it existed 10 million years ago when the plant made a double of its genome—a 'whole genome duplication' event.

Variations in Neuronal Networks Could Explain Traumatic Brain Injury Outcomes

July 15, 2014 12:00 pm | News | Comments

A team of researchers at the Neuroscience Institute at Georgia State University has discovered that hidden differences in the properties of neural circuits can account for whether animals are behaviorally susceptible to brain injury. These results could have implications for the treatment of brain trauma.

Capturing Cancer: A Powerful New Technique for Early Diagnosis

July 15, 2014 11:53 am | News | Comments

In recent years, aggressive research and substantial financial investments have been directed at discovering pre-symptomatic indicators of cancer, known as biomarkers. But as lead author researchers at Arizona State University’s Biodesign Institute emphasize in a new study, the quest for cancer biomarkers has been stymied by a number of factors. They describe a new technique for early disease detection, which they call immunosignaturing.

Friends Share Genetic Similarities

July 15, 2014 11:33 am | News | Comments

If you consider your friends family, you may be on to something. A new study finds that friends who are not biologically related still resemble each other genetically.                        

Stem Cell Scientists Lay a TRAP for Disease

July 14, 2014 2:09 pm | News | Comments

USC Stem Cell scientists have set a “mouse TRAP” to capture the early signs of kidney failure. Their new transgenic mouse line uses a technique called TRAP to extract cellular and genetic information from a variety of solid organs. TRAP involves attaching a fluorescent tag to the ribosomes of the cell type of interest. Scientists can then collect the tagged ribosomes and determine which active genes are ordering proteins to be made. 

Deep Within Spinach Leaves, Vibrations Enhance Efficiency of Photosynthesis

July 14, 2014 1:29 pm | News | Comments

Biophysics researchers at the University of Michigan have used short pulses of light to peer into the mechanics of photosynthesis and illuminate the role that molecule vibrations play in the energy conversion process that powers life on our planet. The findings could potentially help engineers make more efficient solar cells and energy storage systems.

Scientists Find Genetic Recipe to Turn Stem Cells to Blood

July 14, 2014 1:22 pm | News | Comments

The ability to reliably and safely make in the laboratory all of the different types of cells in human blood is one key step closer to reality. A group led by University of Wisconsin-Madison stem cell researcher Igor Slukvin reports the discovery of two genetic programs responsible for taking blank-slate stem cells and turning them into both red and the array of white cells that make up human blood.

AIDS Research Team Loses $1.38M Grant

July 9, 2014 8:30 am | by David Pitt | News | Comments

An AIDS research team at Iowa State University will not get the final $1.38 million payment of a National Institutes of Health five-year grant after a team member admitted last year to faking research results.            

Finger Device Reads to the Blind in Real Time

July 8, 2014 2:18 am | by Rodrique Ngowi - Associated Press - Associated Press | News | Comments

Scientists at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology are developing an audio reading device to be worn on the index finger of people whose vision is impaired, giving them affordable and immediate access to printed words.        

Muscle-powered Bio-bots Walk on Command

July 2, 2014 10:00 am | News | Comments

A new generation of miniature biological robots is flexing its muscle. Engineers have developed a class of walking “bio-bots” powered by muscle cells and controlled with electrical pulses, giving researchers unprecedented command over their function.

Cellular Gates for Sodium, Calcium Controlled by Ancient Element

July 2, 2014 9:46 am | News | Comments

Researchers have spotted a strong family trait in two distant relatives: The channels that permit entry of sodium and calcium ions into cells turn out to share similar means for regulating ion intake, they said.            

X
You may login with either your assigned username or your e-mail address.
The password field is case sensitive.
Loading