Advertisement
Academia News
Subscribe to Academia News

The Lead

Mosaicism: Study Clarifies Parents as Source of New Mutations

July 31, 2014 3:36 pm | News | Comments

Scientists have long speculated that mosaicism plays a bigger role in the transmission of rare disease mutations than is currently known. Now, a study sheds new light on the frequency of mosaicism in genomic disorders and its influence on recurrence risk.

Engineering a Protein to Prevent Brain Damage from Toxic Agents

July 31, 2014 3:21 pm | News | Comments

Research at New York University is paving the way for a breakthrough that may prevent brain...

New Way to Generate Insulin-producing Cells in Diabetes

July 31, 2014 3:20 pm | Videos | Comments

A new study has found that a peptide called caerulein can convert existing cells in the pancreas...

Strict Genomic Partitioning by Biological Clock Separates Key Metabolic Functions

July 31, 2014 3:10 pm | News | Comments

Much of the liver’s metabolic function is governed by circadian rhythms—our own body clock—and...

View Sample

FREE Email Newsletter

Autistic Brain Less Flexible at Taking on Tasks

July 31, 2014 9:41 am | News | Comments

The brains of children with autism are relatively inflexible at switching from rest to task performance, according to a new study. Instead of changing to accommodate a job, connectivity in key brain networks of autistic children looks similar to connectivity in the resting brain. And the greater this inflexibility, the more severe the child’s manifestations of repetitive and restrictive behaviors that characterize autism, the study found.

Birth Weight and Breastfeeding Have Implications for Children’s Health Decades Later

July 31, 2014 9:20 am | News | Comments

Young adults who were breastfed for three months or more as babies have a significantly lower risk of chronic inflammation associated with cardiovascular and metabolic diseases, according to research from the Brown School at Washington University in St. Louis.

Exploring 3-D Printing to Make Organs for Transplants

July 30, 2014 1:19 pm | News | Comments

Printing whole new organs for transplants sounds like something out of a sci-fi movie, but the real-life budding technology could one day make actual kidneys, livers, hearts and other organs for patients who desperately need them. Scientists are reporting new understanding about the dynamics of 3-D bioprinting that takes them a step closer to realizing their goal of making working tissues and organs on-demand.

Advertisement

Retinal Regeneration in Zebrafish

July 30, 2014 12:27 pm | Videos | Comments

Biologists are studying retinal regeneration in zebrafish to find ways to combat human eye diseases. The small, minnow-like fish have eyes that develop in a way very similar to humans, but have the ability to regenerate retinal cells following an injury.

Stem Cells From Nerves Form Teeth

July 29, 2014 12:22 pm | News | Comments

Researchers have discovered that stem cells inside the soft tissues of the tooth come from an unexpected source, namely nerves. These findings contribute to brand new knowledge of how teeth are formed, how they grow and how they are able to self-repair.

Many People Never Grow Out of Growing Pains

July 28, 2014 11:48 am | News | Comments

A new research project shows that many adolescents suffer from knee pain for several years. The pain impacts both sporting activities and quality of life.                            

Total Darkness During the Night is a Key to Success of Breast Cancer Therapy

July 25, 2014 2:05 pm | News | Comments

Exposure to light at night, which shuts off nighttime production of the hormone melatonin, renders breast cancer completely resistant to tamoxifen, a widely used breast cancer drug, says a new study by Tulane University School of Medicine cancer researchers.

Powerful HIV Antibodies May Require Assist from Second Antibody to Develop

July 25, 2014 1:40 pm | News | Comments

One strategy for developing a highly effective HIV vaccine is to learn how some HIV-infected people naturally develop antibodies that can stop a high percentage of global HIV strains from infecting human cells in the laboratory. These so-called broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) develop too late to help infected people overcome the virus.

Advertisement

New Imaging Agent Provides Better Picture of the Gut

July 25, 2014 1:36 pm | News | Comments

A multi-institutional team of researchers has developed a new nanoscale agent for imaging the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. This safe, noninvasive method for assessing the function and properties of the GI tract in real time could lead to better diagnosis and treatment of gut diseases.

Key Muscle Component's Atomic Structure Revealed

July 25, 2014 12:54 pm | News | Comments

In a new study, biophysicists describe– in minute detail- how actin filaments are stabilized at one of their ends to form a basic muscle structure called the sarcomere.                        

Monitoring the Rise and Fall of the Microbiome

July 25, 2014 12:23 pm | News | Comments

Trillions of bacteria live in each person’s digestive tract, but their role in human health is not well understood. To help shed light on the role of these bacteria, a team of researchers recently tracked fluctuations in the bacterial populations of two research subjects over a full year.

Dyes Used to Paint New Picture of Disease

July 24, 2014 2:12 pm | News | Comments

By using brightly hued dyes, George Mason University (GMU) researchers discovered an innovative way to reveal where proteins touch each other, possibly leading to new treatments for cancer, arthritis, heart disease, and even lung disease.

Study Links Autistic Behaviors to Enzyme

July 24, 2014 1:48 pm | News | Comments

Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is a genetic disorder that causes obsessive-compulsive and repetitive behaviors, and other behaviors on the autistic spectrum, as well as cognitive deficits. It is the most common inherited cause of mental impairment and the most common cause of autism. Now biomedical scientists at the University of California, Riverside have published a study that sheds light on the cause of autistic behaviors in FXS. 

Advertisement

Try, Try Again? Study Says No

July 23, 2014 11:00 am | News | Comments

In a new study, a team of researchers has found evidence for a factor that contributes to adults’ language difficulties: When learning certain elements of language, adults’ more highly developed cognitive skills actually get in the way.     

Human Platelets Generated in Bioreactor

July 23, 2014 10:47 am | News | Comments

Scientists have developed a scalable, next-generation platelet bioreactor to generate fully functional human platelets in vitro. The work might help address blood transfusion needs worldwide.                  

Unbreak My Heart

July 23, 2014 10:15 am | Videos | Comments

Researchers of the Max Planck Institute of Molecular Cell Biology and Genetics in Dresden report how they managed to capture detailed three-dimensional images of cardiac dynamics in zebrafish. The novel approach: They combine high-speed Selective Plane Illumination Microscopy (SPIM) and clever image processing to reconstruct multi-view movie stacks of the beating heart.

Potential New Flu Drugs Target Immune Response, Not Virus

July 22, 2014 2:59 pm | News | Comments

The seriousness of disease often results from the strength of immune response, rather than with the virus, itself. Turning down that response, rather than attacking the virus, might be a better way to reduce that severity. Researchers have taken the first step in doing that for the H7N9 influenza, and their work has led to identification of six potential therapeutics for this highly virulent strain.

Viral Therapy Could Boost Limb-saving Cancer Treatment

July 22, 2014 2:52 pm | News | Comments

Viruses designed to target and kill cancer cells could boost the effectiveness of chemotherapy to the arms and legs and help avoid amputation. Scientists tested the effectiveness of a genetically engineered version of the virus used to vaccinate against smallpox. They found use of the virus alongside isolated limb perfusion chemotherapy was more effective in rats than either treatment on its own.

Brain Waves Show Learning to Read Doesn’t End in Fourth Grade

July 22, 2014 2:43 pm | News | Comments

Teachers-in-training have long been taught that the fourth grade is when students stop learning to read and start reading to learn. But a new study tested the theory by analyzing brain waves and found that fourth-graders do not experience a change in automatic word processing. Instead, some types of word processing become automatic before fourth grade, while others don’t switch until after fifth.

Bacteria Swim with Bodies and Flagella

July 22, 2014 2:34 pm | News | Comments

Many bacteria swim using flagella, corkscrew-like appendages that push or pull bacterial cells like propellers. It had been assumed that the flagella do all the work during swimming, while the rest of the cell body is just along for the ride. But new research shows that in at least one species, the cell body is actively carving out a helical trajectory through the water that produces thrust and contributes to the organism's ability to swim.

New Trigger for Ovulation Could Make IVF Safer

July 21, 2014 12:34 pm | Videos | Comments

Researchers have successfully used a new and potentially safer method to stimulate ovulation in women undergoing IVF treatment. Twelve babies have been born after their mothers were given an injection of the natural hormone kisspeptin to make their eggs mature.

Squid Skin Protein Could Improve Biomedical Technologies

July 17, 2014 12:01 pm | News | Comments

The common pencil squid (Loliginidae) may hold the key to a new generation of medical technologies that could communicate more directly with the human body. UC Irvine materials science researchers have discovered that reflectin, a protein in the tentacled creature’s skin, can conduct positive electrical charges, or protons, making it a promising material for building biologically inspired devices.

Team Studies Immune Response of Asian Elephants Infected with a Human Disease

July 16, 2014 1:51 pm | News | Comments

Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the organism that causes tuberculosis in humans, also afflicts Asian elephants. Diagnosing and treating elephants with TB is a challenge, however, as little is known about how their immune systems respond to the infection. A new study begins to address this knowledge gap, and offers new tools for detecting and monitoring TB in captive elephants.

Babies’ Brains Rehearse Speech Before First Words

July 15, 2014 12:39 pm | News | Comments

Research in seven- and 11-month-old infants shows that speech sounds stimulate areas of the brain that coordinate and plan motor movements for speech. The study suggests that baby brains start laying down the groundwork of how to form words long before they actually begin to speak.

A-maize-ing Double Life of a Genome

July 15, 2014 12:06 pm | News | Comments

Early maize farmers selected for genes that improved the harvesting of sunlight, a new detailed study of how plants use 'doubles' of their genomes reveals. The findings could help current efforts to improve existing crop varieties. Oxford University researchers captured a 'genetic snapshot' of maize as it existed 10 million years ago when the plant made a double of its genome—a 'whole genome duplication' event.

X
You may login with either your assigned username or your e-mail address.
The password field is case sensitive.
Loading