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Fairness is in the Brain

October 20, 2014 12:18 pm | News | Comments

Ever wondered how people figure out what is fair? Look to the brain for the answer. According to a new study, people appreciate fairness in much the same way as they appreciate money for themselves, and also that fairness is not necessarily that everybody gets the same income.

Scientific Evidence Does Not Support 'Brain Game' Claims

October 20, 2014 11:39 am | News | Comments

A group of scholars issued a statement skeptical about the effectiveness of so-called "...

New Front in War on Alzheimer’s, Other Protein-folding Diseases

October 17, 2014 12:06 pm | News | Comments

A surprise discovery that overturns decades of thinking about how the body fixes proteins...

Babies’ Hearts May Beat Path to Heart Attack Treatments

October 17, 2014 11:50 am | Videos | Comments

The seemingly miraculous power of babies’ hearts to repair themselves after being...

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Explaining More About Airway Closure During Asthma Attacks

October 16, 2014 2:28 pm | News | Comments

In acute asthma, various triggers, including viral illnesses and aeroallergens, can cause acute narrowing of the airways leading to a life-threatening respiratory crisis and sometimes death. Researchers have identified a novel factor that puts the brakes on airway smooth-muscle contraction relevant to asthma.

Tiny, Sound-Powered Chip May Serve as Medical Device

October 15, 2014 2:43 pm | News | Comments

Using ultrasound to deliver power wirelessly, researchers are working on a new generation of medical devices that would be planted deep inside the body to monitor illness, deliver therapies and relieve pain.             

Cellular 'Snooze Button' Advances Cancer, Biofuel Research

October 14, 2014 11:48 am | News | Comments

The discovery of a cellular snooze button has allowed a team of scientists to potentially improve biofuel production and offer insight on the early stages of cancer.                         

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Bioinspired Coating Repels Blood, Bacteria from Medical Devices

October 13, 2014 2:03 pm | News | Comments

A team of scientists and engineers developed a new surface coating for medical devices using materials already approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The coating repelled blood from more than 20 medically relevant substrates the team tested.

Manipulating Memory with Light

October 10, 2014 11:30 am | News | Comments

Just look into the light: not quite, but researchers have used light to erase specific memories in mice, and proved a basic theory of how different parts of the brain work together to retrieve episodic memories.            

Bioprinted 3-D Device Aids Blood Detoxification

October 8, 2014 10:45 am | by Skip Derra | Articles | Comments

A team of engineers has successfully developed a three-dimensional-printed device, which mimics the operation of the liver to remove dangerous toxins from the blood.                         

A Needle in a Haystack: Technique Spots Stem Cells in Bone Marrow

October 7, 2014 1:27 pm | News | Comments

In a new study that should make it easier to develop stem-cell-based therapies, a team of researchers has identified three physical characteristics of MSCs that can distinguish them from other immature cells found in the bone marrow.     

Scientists Develop Barcoding Tool for Stem Cells

October 6, 2014 11:46 am | News | Comments

A project to develop a barcoding and tracking system for tissue stem cells has revealed previously unrecognized features of normal blood production: New data suggests, surprisingly, that the billions of blood cells that we produce each day are made not by blood stem cells, but rather their less pluripotent descendants, called progenitor cells.

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Height 'Almost Completely Determined' by Genetics

October 6, 2014 11:26 am | News | Comments

The largest genome-wide association study (GWAS) to date, involving more than 300 institutions and more than 250,000 subjects, roughly doubles the number of known gene regions influencing height to more than 400.           

New Discovery in the Microbiology of Serious Human Disease

October 3, 2014 2:41 pm | News | Comments

Previously undiscovered secrets of how human cells interact with a bacterium which causes a serious human disease have been revealed in new research by microbiologists.                        

Scientists Discover Gene Controlling Muscle Fate

September 30, 2014 2:11 pm | News | Comments

Scientists have moved a step closer to improving medical science through research involving muscle manipulation of fruit flies. They discovered in the flight muscles of Drosophila a new regulator of a process called alternative splicing.     

Ancient Human Genome Throws New Light on Origins

September 29, 2014 12:31 pm | News | Comments

What can DNA from the skeleton of a man who lived 2,330 years ago in the southernmost tip of Africa tell us about ourselves as humans? A great deal when his DNA profile is one of the "earliest diverged"– oldest in genetic terms– found to-date in a region where modern humans are believed to have originated roughly 200,000 years ago.

U.S. Issues New Rules for University Germ Research

September 25, 2014 8:30 am | by Lauran Neergaard - AP Medical Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

The Obama administration is tightening oversight of high-stakes scientific research involving dangerous germs that could raise biosecurity concerns, imposing new safety rules on universities and other institutions where such work is done.   

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Diabetes in Need of New Screening, Management Approach

September 24, 2014 2:39 pm | News | Comments

Doctors at three leading research institutions and the American Diabetes Association report that treating patients with prediabetes as if they had diabetes could help prevent or delay the most severe complications associated with this chronic disease.

Grant Will Help Study Link Between Blueberries, Bone Health

September 23, 2014 2:42 pm | News | Comments

A $3.7 million grant will allow Purdue University researchers to study how blueberries reduce bone loss in postmenopausal women. The project begins Sept. 30 under a five-year grant from the National Institutes of Health's National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine.

How Gene Expression Affects Facial Expressions

September 22, 2014 12:13 pm | News | Comments

A person’s face is the first thing that others see, and much remains unknown about how it forms— or malforms— during early development. New research has begun to unwind these mysteries.                   

New Discovery About 3-D Shape Processing in the Brain

September 19, 2014 8:30 am | News | Comments

While previous studies of the brain suggest that processing of objects and place occur in very different locations, a research team has found that they are closely related.                       

One-minute Point-of-care Anemia Test Shows Promise

September 17, 2014 12:54 pm | News | Comments

A simple point-of-care testing device for anemia could provide more rapid diagnosis of the common blood disorder and allow inexpensive at-home self-monitoring of persons with chronic forms of the disease.             

Brain Scans Forecast Early Reading Difficulties

September 16, 2014 2:31 pm | News | Comments

Researchers have used brain scans to predict how young children learn to read, giving clinicians a possible tool to spot children with dyslexia and other reading difficulties before they experience reading challenges.         

'Biospleen' is a Blood Cleanser for Sepsis

September 15, 2014 1:21 pm | News | Comments

Things can go downhill fast when a patient has sepsis, a life-threatening condition in which bacteria or fungi multiply in the blood—often too fast for antibiotics to help. A new device inspired by the human spleen may radically transform the way doctors treat sepsis.

Researchers Find Final Pieces to Circadian Clock Puzzle

September 15, 2014 12:59 pm | News | Comments

Researchers have discovered how two genes– Period and Cryptochrome– keep the circadian clocks in all human cells in time and in proper rhythm with the 24-hour day, as well as the seasons.                  

Cells Put Off Protein Production During Times of Stress

September 11, 2014 3:26 pm | News | Comments

Researchers have shown that a stressed cell recognizes the buildup of misfolded proteins and responds by reshuffling its workload, much like a stressed out employee might temporarily move papers from an overflowing inbox into a junk drawer.   

New Defense Mechanism Against Viruses Discovered

September 11, 2014 2:05 pm | News | Comments

Researchers have discovered that a known quality control mechanism in human, animal and plant cells is active against viruses. They think it might represent one of the oldest defense mechanisms against viruses in evolutionary history.      

Ebola’s Ripple Effects

September 11, 2014 12:04 pm | Videos | Comments

The race to stamp out West Africa’s Ebola epidemic is not just about saving lives. It’s also about stemming an assault on society that could include food shortages and mass migration, morphing from a medical emergency into a broad humanitarian crisis.

Lady Baboons With Guy Pals Live Longer

September 10, 2014 11:19 am | News | Comments

Numerous studies have linked social interaction to improved health and survival in humans, and new research confirms that the same is true for baboons.                             

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