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Engineer Invents Safe Way to Transfer Energy to Medical Chips in the Body

May 20, 2014 12:23 pm Videos Comments

A Stanford electrical engineer has invented a way to wirelessly transfer power deep inside the body and then use this power to run tiny electronic medical gadgets such as pacemakers, nerve stimulators or new sensors and devices yet to be developed.

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Watching HIV Bud from Cells

May 19, 2014 2:15 pm Videos Comments

University of Utah researchers devised a way to watch newly forming AIDS virus particles emerging or “budding” from infected human cells without interfering with the process. The method shows a protein named ALIX gets involved during the final stages of virus replication, not earlier, as was believed previously.

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Illuminating Neuron Activity in 3-D

May 19, 2014 1:37 pm Videos Comments

Researchers at MIT and the University of Vienna have created an imaging system that reveals neural activity throughout the brains of living animals. This technique, the first that can generate 3-D movies of entire brains at the millisecond timescale, could help scientists discover how neuronal networks process sensory information and generate behavior.

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Research Leads to New Understanding of How Cells Grow, Shrink

May 16, 2014 1:19 pm Videos Comments

For a century, biologists have thought they understood how the gooey growth that occurs inside cells causes their protective outer walls to expand. Now, researchers have captured the visual evidence to prove the prevailing wisdom wrong.    

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The Promise of Personalized Medicine: An Apples-to-Apples Approach

May 16, 2014 12:18 pm Videos Comments

In our sixth video, Andrew Wiecek wraps up the discussion by taking a look at one of the therapeutic areas that could be significantly improved by personalized medicine: cancer. The approach is similar to comparing apples to apples, he says.

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Where Have All the Mitochondria Gone?

May 15, 2014 11:16 am Videos Comments

It’s common knowledge that all organisms inherit their mitochondria—the cell’s “power plants”—from their mothers. But what happens to all the father’s mitochondria? How—and why—paternal mitochondria are prevented from getting passed on to their offspring after fertilization is still shrouded in mystery.

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Measles Vaccine Can Kill Multiple Myeloma Cells

May 15, 2014 11:00 am Videos Comments

In a proof-of-principle clinical trial, researchers have demonstrated that virotherapy— destroying cancer with a virus that infects and kills cancer cells but spares normal tissues— can be effective against the deadly cancer multiple myeloma.   

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Microchip-Like Technology Allows Single-Cell Analysis

May 14, 2014 1:12 pm Videos Comments

A U.S. and Korean research team has developed a chip-like device that could be scaled up to sort and store hundreds of thousands of individual living cells in a matter of minutes. The system is similar to a random access memory chip, but it moves cells rather than electrons.

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Implanted Transistors Wrap Around Tissues

May 13, 2014 2:16 pm Videos Comments

Researchers from The University of Texas at Dallas and the University of Tokyo have created electronic devices that become soft when implanted inside the body and can deploy to grip 3-D objects, such as large tissues, nerves and blood vessels. These biologically adaptive, flexible transistors might one day help doctors learn more about what is happening inside the body, and stimulate the body for treatments.

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Autism-related Protein Plays Vital Role in Addiction

May 12, 2014 1:19 pm Videos Comments

Investigators report that a gene essential for normal brain development, and previously linked to Autism Spectrum Disorders, also plays a critical role in addiction-related behaviors.                   

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Better Cognition Seen with Gene Carried by 1 in 5 People

May 9, 2014 12:56 pm Videos Comments

A scientific team has discovered that a common form of a gene already associated with long life also improves learning and memory, a finding that could have implications for treating age-related diseases like Alzheimer’s.         

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Bone Marrow-on-a-chip Unveiled

May 6, 2014 12:16 pm Videos Comments

The latest organ-on-a-chip from Harvard's Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering reproduces the structure, functions and cellular make-up of bone marrow, a complex tissue that until now could only be studied intact in living animals.

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The Power of Personalized Medicine: It’s in the Stars

May 1, 2014 2:13 pm Videos Comments

This six-part video series from both Bioscience Technology and Drug Discovery & Development explains what personalized medicine is, how it works and the potential of this concept. In today's video, Rob Fee returns to discuss the power of genetic testing and preemptive medicine. But how do you learn if you carry risky genes, and most importantly, what do you do with that information? 

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Algae “See” a Wide Spectrum of Light

May 1, 2014 1:42 pm Videos Comments

Aquatic algae can sense an unexpectedly wide range of color, allowing them to sense and adapt to changing light conditions in lakes and oceans. Phytochromes are the eyes of a plant, allowing it to detect changes in the color, intensity, and quality of light so that the plant can react and adapt. Typically about 20 percent of a plant’s genes are regulated by phytochromes.

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Stem Cells Regenerate Heart Muscle in Primates

May 1, 2014 1:24 pm Videos Comments

Stem cell therapy can regenerate heart muscle in primates, according to a new study. The scientists on this and related projects are seeking way to repair hearts weakened by myocardial infarctions.               

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