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How the Brain Pays Attention

April 11, 2014 1:46 pm Videos Comments

Picking out a face in the crowd is a complicated task: Your brain has to retrieve the memory of the face you’re seeking, then hold it in place while scanning the crowd, paying special attention to finding a match. A new study reveals how the brain achieves this type of focused attention on faces or other objects.

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Potential Link Between Brain Development and Breast Cancer Gene

April 9, 2014 2:09 pm Videos Comments

Scientists at the Salk Institute have uncovered details into a surprising—and crucial—link between brain development and a gene whose mutation is tied to breast and ovarian cancer. Aside from better understanding neurological damage associated in a small percentage of people susceptible to breast cancers, the new work also helps to better understand the evolution of the brain.

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Scientists ID Key Cells in Touch Sensation

April 7, 2014 1:49 pm Videos Comments

In a new study, researchers solved an age-old mystery of touch: how cells just beneath the skin surface enable us to feel fine details and textures.                              

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Examination of a Cave-Dwelling Fish Finds a Possible Genetic Link to Human Disorders

April 4, 2014 2:35 pm Videos Comments

Researchers have identified a genetic association with facial asymmetry in an ancient cavefish, a natural trait that may solve mysteries surrounding facial asymmetries in humans—conditions such as cleft palate or hemifacial microsomia. 

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Nanoparticles Cause Cancer to Self-destruct

April 3, 2014 1:59 pm Videos Comments

Using magnetically controlled nanoparticles to force tumor cells to ‘self-destruct’ sounds like science fiction, but could be a future part of cancer treatment, according to research from Lund University in Sweden. The new technique is much more targeted than trying to kill cancer cells with techniques such as chemotherapy.

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How Personalized Medicine Works: Bioinformaticians to the Rescue

April 3, 2014 12:14 pm Videos Comments

In our third video, Rob Fee is back to discuss how informatics can help to overcome one of the biggest challenges in personalized medicine: organizing and examining the mountains of data that are generated during the gene sequencing process. Rob's advice? Find a bioinformatician...fast!

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Researcher Invents ‘Mini Heart’ to Help Return Venous Blood

March 27, 2014 2:16 pm Videos Comments

George Washington University researcher Narine Sarvazyan, PhD, has invented a new organ to help return blood flow from veins lacking functional valves. A rhythmically contracting cuff made of cardiac muscle cells surrounds the vein acting as a 'mini heart' to aid blood flow through venous segments. The cuff can be made of a patient’s own adult stem cells, eliminating the chance of implant rejection.

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Autism Linked to Flawed Prenatal Brain Growth

March 27, 2014 11:46 am | by Lindsey Tanner - AP Medical Writer Videos Comments

A small study that examined brains from children who died found abnormal patterns of cell growth in autistic children. The research bolsters evidence that something before birth might cause autism, at least in some cases.         

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Catheter Innovation Destroys Dangerous Biofilms

March 25, 2014 1:26 pm Videos Comments

For the millions of people forced to rely on a plastic tube to eliminate their urine, developing an infection is nearly a 100 percent guarantee after just four weeks. But with the help of a little bubble-blowing, biomedical engineers hope to bring relief to urethras everywhere.

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New Technique Sheds Light on Human Neural Networks

March 25, 2014 11:24 am Videos Comments

A new technique, developed by researchers in the Quantitative Light Imaging Laboratory at the Beckman Institute, provides a method to noninvasively measure human neural networks in order to characterize how they form. Using spatial light interference microscopy techniques, the researchers were able to show how human embryonic stem cell derived neurons within a network grow, organize, and dynamically transport materials to one another.

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How Personalized Medicine Works: Bananas and Biomarkers

March 20, 2014 1:25 pm Videos Comments

In part two of a six-part video series on personalized medicine, Andrew Wiecek discusses how personalized medicine works by highlighting the importance of biomarkers (and bananas) and showing that they play a key role in identifying genetic variations associated with disease.

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Scientists Slow Development of Alzheimer's Trademark Cell-killing Plaques

March 18, 2014 2:44 pm Videos Comments

University of Michigan researchers have learned how to fix a cellular structure called the Golgi that mysteriously becomes fragmented in all Alzheimer's patients and appears to be a major cause of the disease. They say that understanding this mechanism helps decode amyloid plaque formation in the brains of Alzheimer's patients.

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Roomy Cages Built From DNA

March 14, 2014 1:38 pm Videos Comments

Scientists at the Harvard's Wyss Institute have built a set of self-assembling DNA cages one-tenth as wide as a bacterium. The structures are some of the largest and most complex structures ever constructed solely from DNA. The scientists visualized them using a DNA-based super-resolution microscopy method — and obtained the first sharp 3D optical images of intact synthetic DNA nanostructures in solution.

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What Happened When? How the Brain Stores Memories by Time

March 13, 2014 2:04 pm Videos Comments

Before I left the house this morning, I let the cat out and started the dishwasher. Or was that yesterday? Very often, our memories must distinguish not just what happened and where, but when an event occurred—and what came before and after. New research shows that a part of the brain called the hippocampus stores memories by their "temporal context"—what happened before, and what came after.

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Scientists ‘Herd’ Cells in New Approach to Tissue Engineering

March 12, 2014 1:24 pm Videos Comments

Sometimes it only takes a quick jolt of electricity to get a swarm of cells moving in the right direction. Researchers found that an electrical current can be used to orchestrate the flow of a group of cells, an achievement that could establish the basis for more controlled forms of tissue engineering and for potential applications such as “smart bandages” that use electrical stimulation to help heal wounds.

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