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Making People Smarter Through Brain Stimulation

July 16, 2014 11:10 am | News | Comments

Brain stimulation used to be just a cool idea in science fiction movies, novels and other hard to believe tales when human subjects were stimulated using electrical currents and achieved near super-human feats. Now, brain stimulation is a step closer to becoming a possible reality.

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Protein's 'Hands' Enable Bacteria to Establish Infection

July 16, 2014 10:01 am | News | Comments

When it comes to infecting humans and animals, bacteria need a helping hand. Biochemists have found the helping hand: groups of tiny protein loops on the surface of cells.                       

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Breaking News: Mutant Worms Can’t Get Drunk

July 16, 2014 8:30 am | News | Comments

Neuroscientists have generated mutant worms that do not get intoxicated by alcohol, a result that could lead to new drugs to treat the symptoms of people going through alcohol withdrawal.                   

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Number of people with HIV unchanged since 2012

July 16, 2014 5:17 am | by Maria Cheng - AP Medical Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

The number of people living with HIV worldwide has remained virtually unchanged in the past two years and AIDS-related deaths are at their lowest since peaking almost a decade ago, according to a report from the United Nations AIDS agency released Wednesday. Officials declared that ending the...

New Brain Protein Tied to Alzheimer's Disease

July 16, 2014 3:20 am | by Marilynn Marchione - AP Chief Medical Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

Scientists have linked a new protein to Alzheimer's disease, different from the amyloid and tau that make up the sticky brain plaques and tangles long known to be its hallmarks.                      

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One for the Aged

July 15, 2014 2:32 pm | by Skip Derra | Articles | Comments

What we currently know about aging is not highly specific; our cells divide many times throughout our lives and eventually cause organs and our bodies to age, break down and fail. New research, however, suggests that how we age might depend on cellular interactions that we inherit from our ancestors, accumulating throughout many generations.

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High Performance Liquid Chromatography System

July 15, 2014 1:26 pm | Product Releases | Comments

Thermo Fisher Scientific unveiled a new high performance liquid chromatography system designed from the ground up to provide new levels of performance, productivity and usability when used as a standalone system or with the latest mass spectrometers.

Study Pinpoints Damage Alcohol Causes to the Brain

July 15, 2014 12:55 pm | News | Comments

New research has identified, for the first time, the structural damage at a molecular level that excessive alcohol abuse causes to the brain. The study detected the loss and modification of several key cellular proteins in the brains of alcoholics.

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Babies’ Brains Rehearse Speech Before First Words

July 15, 2014 12:39 pm | News | Comments

Research in seven- and 11-month-old infants shows that speech sounds stimulate areas of the brain that coordinate and plan motor movements for speech. The study suggests that baby brains start laying down the groundwork of how to form words long before they actually begin to speak.

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Proof: Parkinson's Enhances Creativity

July 15, 2014 12:11 pm | News | Comments

Two years ago, the exceptional creativity of Parkinson's patients was demonstrated in a review for Behavioral Neuroscience. Now, a new empirical study definitively demonstrates that Parkinson's patients are more creative than their healthy peers.

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A-maize-ing Double Life of a Genome

July 15, 2014 12:06 pm | News | Comments

Early maize farmers selected for genes that improved the harvesting of sunlight, a new detailed study of how plants use 'doubles' of their genomes reveals. The findings could help current efforts to improve existing crop varieties. Oxford University researchers captured a 'genetic snapshot' of maize as it existed 10 million years ago when the plant made a double of its genome—a 'whole genome duplication' event.

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Variations in Neuronal Networks Could Explain Traumatic Brain Injury Outcomes

July 15, 2014 12:00 pm | News | Comments

A team of researchers at the Neuroscience Institute at Georgia State University has discovered that hidden differences in the properties of neural circuits can account for whether animals are behaviorally susceptible to brain injury. These results could have implications for the treatment of brain trauma.

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Capturing Cancer: A Powerful New Technique for Early Diagnosis

July 15, 2014 11:53 am | News | Comments

In recent years, aggressive research and substantial financial investments have been directed at discovering pre-symptomatic indicators of cancer, known as biomarkers. But as lead author researchers at Arizona State University’s Biodesign Institute emphasize in a new study, the quest for cancer biomarkers has been stymied by a number of factors. They describe a new technique for early disease detection, which they call immunosignaturing.

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Friends Share Genetic Similarities

July 15, 2014 11:33 am | News | Comments

If you consider your friends family, you may be on to something. A new study finds that friends who are not biologically related still resemble each other genetically.                        

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Lightning deaths at national park concern visitors

July 15, 2014 3:16 am | by Brennan Linsley - Associated Press - Associated Press | News | Comments

ROCKY MOUNTAIN NATIONAL PARK, Colo. (AP) — Visitors to Rocky Mountain National Park are hiking more cautiously after lightning strikes at the popular park killed two people in two days at the height of summer travel season. Signs around the park warn its 3 million annual visitors that storms can...

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