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Doctors treating Spanish Ebola nurse hopeful

October 13, 2014 7:37 am | by The Associated Press | News | Comments

The director of the Madrid hospital treating Spain's Ebola patient says the woman is stable and doctors are cautiously hopeful she will recover. Antonio Andreu told Onda Cero radio Monday that tests carried out on assistant nurse Teresa Romero on Sunday showed the level of virus had diminished...

Ebola is Modern Era's Worst Health Emergency

October 13, 2014 7:37 am | by Jim Gomez - Associated Press - Associated Press | News | Comments

The World Health Organization called the Ebola outbreak "the most severe, acute health emergency seen in modern times" on Monday but also said that economic disruptions can be curbed if people are adequately informed to prevent irrational moves to dodge infection.

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Steris to spend $1.9B on UK's Synergy Health

October 13, 2014 7:36 am | by The Associated Press | News | Comments

Steris Corp. is spending about $1.9 billion to buy British sterilization services company Synergy Health as U.S. corporations continue to incorporate overseas despite attempts to make such tax-saving maneuvers less lucrative. The medical products maker says the combined company will keep its...

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Can U.S. Hospitals Handle Ebola?

October 13, 2014 4:36 am | by Marilynn Marchione - AP Chief Medical Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

A breach of infection control resulting in a Dallas health worker getting Ebola raises fresh questions about whether hospitals truly can safely take care of people with the deadly virus, as health officials insist is possible.         

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Dallas health worker tests positive for Ebola

October 12, 2014 5:36 pm | by Nomaan Merchant - Associated Press - Associated Press | News | Comments

A "breach of protocol" at the hospital where Ebola victim Thomas Eric Duncan was treated before his death led to the infection of a health care worker with the deadly virus, and other caregivers could potentially be exposed, federal health officials said Sunday. The hospital worker, a woman who...

Key question: How did Dallas worker catch Ebola?

October 12, 2014 3:36 pm | by Marilynn Marchione - AP Chief Medical Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

Officials are investigating how a Dallas health worker who treated an Ebola patient ended up with the disease herself. They say the worker wore full protective gear while treating Thomas Eric Duncan, a Liberian man who died Wednesday at Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital. The worker doesn't know...

CDC: Protocol breach in treating Ebola patient

October 12, 2014 9:36 am | by Carole Feldman - Associated Press - Associated Press | News | Comments

A top federal health official says the Ebola diagnosis in a health care worker who treated Thomas Eric Duncan at a Texas hospital shows there was a clear breach of safety protocol. Dr. Tom Frieden, head of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, says the worker had treated Duncan multiple...

Liberia nurses threaten strike over Ebola pay

October 12, 2014 6:36 am | by The Associated Press | News | Comments

Liberian officials are pleading with nurses and physician assistants to show up to work Monday amid a dispute over hazard pay that has prompted calls for a strike in the middle of the Ebola epidemic. Assistant health minister Tolbert Nyenswah said Sunday the proposed strike would have "very...

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AP Enterprise: Records chronicle how Ebola kills

October 11, 2014 6:35 pm | by Emily Schmall - Associated Press - Associated Press | News | Comments

Despite five days of intensive treatment, Thomas Eric Duncan's condition was deteriorating. Then, suddenly on the afternoon of Oct. 2, came a hopeful sign. Duncan was hungry. Nurses at a Texas hospital raised the 45-year-old welder from Liberia into a sitting position and gave him a packet of...

Michigan toddler dies from enterovirus D68

October 11, 2014 3:36 pm | by The Associated Press | News | Comments

A toddler is the first person in Michigan to die from the virus that has caused severe respiratory illness across the country. Children's Hospital of Michigan in Detroit says 21-month-old Madeline Reid died Friday afternoon from enterovirus D68. Chief Medical Officer Dr. Rudolph Valentini said...

New once-a-day pill for hepatitis C wins FDA OK

October 10, 2014 3:35 pm | by Matthew Perrone - AP Health Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

Federal health officials have approved a daily pill that can cure the most common form of hepatitis C without the grueling pill-and-injection cocktail long used to treat the virus. But the drug's $1,125-per-pill price is sure to increase criticism of drugmaker Gilead Sciences, whose pricing...

siRNA Generation Kit Mimics Natural RNA Interference

October 10, 2014 12:00 pm | Product Releases | Comments

The Dicer siRNA Generation Kit from AMSBIO mimics the natural RNA interference process by using recombinant human dicer enzyme to cleave in vitro transcribed dsRNA templates into a pool of 22 bp siRNAs.

Acid Storage Cabinet

October 10, 2014 11:50 am | Product Releases | Comments

The Acid Storage Cabinet from HEMCO is specifically designed for the storage of corrosive chemicals.

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Newly Discovered Brain Cells Explain Oxytocin's Prosocial Effect

October 10, 2014 11:43 am | News | Comments

Oxytocin, the body’s natural love potion, helps couples fall in love, makes mothers bond with their babies, and encourages teams to work together. Now, new research reveals a mechanism by which this prosocial hormone has its effect on interactions between the sexes, at least in certain situations. The key is a newly discovered class of brain cells.

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Neural Stem Cell Overgrowth, Autism-like Behavior May be Linked

October 10, 2014 11:36 am | News | Comments

People with autism spectrum disorder often experience a period of accelerated brain growth after birth. No one knows why, or whether the change is linked to any specific behavioral changes. A new mouse study demonstrates how inflammation can trigger an excessive division of neural stem cells that can cause “overgrowth” in offspring’s brain.

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