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Plants Survive Mass Extinctions Better Than Animals

February 18, 2015 12:33 pm | by University of Gothenburg | News | Comments

At least 5 mass extinction events have profoundly changed the history of life on Earth. But a new study led by researchers at the University of Gothenburg shows that plants have been very resilient to those events.  

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Amyloid Formation May Link Alzheimer's, Type 2 Diabetes

February 18, 2015 12:28 pm | by Elsevier Health Sciences | News | Comments

The pathological process amyloidosis, in which misfolded proteins (amyloids) form insoluble fibril deposits, occurs in many diseases, including Alzheimer disease (AD) and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D). 

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NIH-Supported Researchers Map Epigenome of More than 100 Tissue, Cell Types

February 18, 2015 12:23 pm | by NIH | News | Comments

Much like mapping the human genome laid the foundations for understanding the genetic basis of human health, new maps of the human epigenome may further unravel the complex links between DNA and disease. The epigenome is part of the machinery that helps direct how genes are turned off and on in different types of cells.

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Think Again About Gender Gap in Science

February 18, 2015 11:55 am | by Northwestern Univ. | News | Comments

Scholars from diverse fields have long proposed that interlocking factors such as cognitive abilities, discrimination and interests may cause more women than men to leave the science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) pipeline after entering college. Now a new Northwestern University analysis has poked holes in the much referenced "leaky pipeline" metaphor.

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Tadpole Model Links Drug Exposure to Autism-Like Effects

February 18, 2015 11:51 am | News | Comments

Research suggests that fetal exposure to chemicals or drugs can cause neurological problems. Babies whose mothers take the epilepsy drug valporic acid (VPA) during pregnancy, for example, appear to have an elevated risk of developing an autism spectrum disorder.

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Is Strenuous Running Really as Bad for Health as Lounging?

February 18, 2015 11:32 am | by Cynthia Fox, Science Writer | News | Comments

Running hard may be as bad for your longevity as being a couch potato, says a recent study—one that should be taken with a grain of salt (hold the butter), say some critics. The study, in a recent Journal of the American College of Cardiology, examined 5,048 healthy people enrolled in the Copenhagen City Heart Study. For 12 years, 1,098 healthy joggers and 413 healthy, but sedentary non-joggers were followed.

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Polypropylene Ductless Fume Hoods

February 17, 2015 4:29 pm | Product Releases | Comments

E-Series free-standing polypropylene ductless fume hoods join AirClean Systems’ line of operator protection products. AirClean Systems’ ductless fume hood lineup has been further expanded to include free-standing fume hoods capable of enclosing equipment up to 52” tall.

Broca's Area is the Brain's Scriptwriter, Shaping Speech

February 17, 2015 4:27 pm | by Johns Hopkins University | News | Comments

This new insight about Broca’s area, which is located in the frontal cortex above and behind the left eye, could ultimately benefit the treatment of language impairments due to stroke, epilepsy and brain injuries.        

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Anti-Inflammatory Mechanism of Dieting, Fasting Revealed

February 17, 2015 4:22 pm | by Karen N. Peart, Yale News | News | Comments

Researchers have found that a compound produced by the body when dieting or fasting can block a part of the immune system involved in several inflammatory disorders such as type 2 diabetes, atherosclerosis, and Alzheimer’s disease.     

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Mothers Can Pass Traits to Offspring Through Bacteria's DNA

February 17, 2015 4:14 pm | by Michael C. Purdy, Washington University in St. Louis | News | Comments

Bacteria are most familiar through their roles in harmful infections. But scientists have realized that such bacteria are only a tiny fraction of the bacterial communities that live in and on our bodies. Most bacteria are commensal, which means they do not cause harm and often confer benefits.

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Iron May be a Factor in Dementia

February 17, 2015 4:09 pm | by Leigh Dayton, UTS | News | Comments

There is no way to spot Alzheimer's early, no effective treatment and no known cure.                             

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Severe Sore Throat Linked to Forgotten Bacterium

February 17, 2015 4:03 pm | by Bob Shepard, UAB | News | Comments

New research suggests that this bacterium causes more often causes severe sore throats in young adults than streptococcus — the cause of the much better known strep throat.             

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Protein Clue to Sudden Cardiac Death

February 17, 2015 3:56 pm | by Oxford University | News | Comments

A protein has been shown to have a surprising role in regulating the 'glue' that holds heart cells together, a finding that may explain how a gene defect could cause sudden cardiac death.            

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Tiny Oregon Minnow is First Fish Taken Off Endangered List

February 17, 2015 3:51 pm | by Jeff Barnard, Associated Press | News | Comments

A tiny minnow that lives only in backwaters in Oregon's Willamette Valley is the first fish to be formally removed from Endangered Species Act protection because it is no longer in danger of extinction.          

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Health Groups Say AIDS No. 1 Killer of Adolescents in Africa

February 17, 2015 3:47 pm | by Tom Odula, Associated Press | News | Comments

Global health organizations said Tuesday that AIDS is now the leading cause of death for adolescents in Africa, and the second leading cause of death among adolescents globally.              

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