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Bacteria Swim with Bodies and Flagella

July 22, 2014 2:34 pm | News | Comments

Many bacteria swim using flagella, corkscrew-like appendages that push or pull bacterial cells like propellers. It had been assumed that the flagella do all the work during swimming, while the rest of the cell body is just along for the ride. But new research shows that in at least one species, the cell body is actively carving out a helical trajectory through the water that produces thrust and contributes to the organism's ability to swim.

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Stem Cells Aid Muscle Repair and Strengthening After Resistance Exercise

July 22, 2014 2:10 pm | News | Comments

A new study in mice reveals that mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) help rejuvenate skeletal muscle after resistance exercise. By injecting MSCs into mouse leg muscles prior to several bouts of eccentric exercise, researchers were able to increase the rate of repair and enhance the growth and strength of those muscles in the exercising mice.

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Researchers Successfully Eliminate the HIV Virus from Cultured Human Cells

July 22, 2014 1:49 pm | Videos | Comments

The HIV-1 virus has proved to be tenacious, inserting its genome permanently into its victims' DNA, forcing patients to take a lifelong drug regimen to control the virus and prevent a fresh attack. Now, a team of Temple University School of Medicine researchers has designed a way to snip out the integrated HIV-1 genes for good.

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Eating Probiotics Regularly May Improve Your Blood Pressure

July 22, 2014 1:36 pm | News | Comments

Eating probiotics regularly may modestly improve your blood pressure, according to new research. Probiotics are live microorganisms (naturally occurring bacteria in the gut) thought to have beneficial effects; common sources are yogurt or dietary supplements.

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Mixed Genes Mix Up the Migrations of Hybrid Birds

July 22, 2014 1:23 pm | News | Comments

Mixed genes appear to drive hybrid birds to select more difficult routes than their parent species, according to new research from University of British Columbia zoologists. the researchers harnessed a flock of B.C. Swainson’s thrushes with tiny geolocating backpacks to map their routes as they migrated south through the U.S. to Central and South America.

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Breaking News: Lack of Vitamin D Ups Schizophrenia Risk

July 22, 2014 1:17 pm | News | Comments

Vitamin D-deficient individuals are twice as likely to be diagnosed with schizophrenia as people who have sufficient levels of the vitamin, according to a new study.                        

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HIV pills show more promise to prevent infection

July 22, 2014 3:21 am | by The Associated Press | News | Comments

There is more good news about HIV treatment pills used to prevent infection in people at high risk of getting the AIDS virus: Follow-up from a landmark study that proved the drug works now shows that it does not encourage risky sex and is effective even if people skip some doses. The research was...

Judge: FDA can't use tobacco panel menthol report

July 21, 2014 8:19 pm | by Michael Felberbaum - AP Tobacco Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

The Food and Drug Administration can't use an advisory panel's 2011 report on menthol cigarettes because its members had conflicts of interest, a federal judge ruled Monday. While the agency has since conducted an independent review on the public health impact of menthol cigarettes, the ruling...

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Correction: Marijuana Research-Professor Fired

July 21, 2014 6:16 pm | by The Associated Press | News | Comments

In a story July 18 about a marijuana researcher who was fired from the University of Arizona, The Associated Press reported erroneously that the university is looking for a new researcher who can raise more money. The study is already funded. A corrected version of the story is below: Professor...

Health dept.: West Virginia clinic reused needles

July 21, 2014 5:16 pm | by The Associated Press | News | Comments

Health officials on Monday advised patients of a West Virginia pain management clinic to be tested for blood-borne infectious diseases after an investigation found potentially that needles had been reused. The investigation by West Virginia health officials found that, prior to November 2013,...

Adaptable, Semi-automatic Microplate Sealer

July 21, 2014 2:49 pm | Product Releases | Comments

The MiniSeal II semi-automatic microplate sealer from Porvair Sciences comes complete with adapters enabling it to process deep well, shallow well, low profile deep well, filter and assay plates that conform to the ANSI / SLAS standard format.

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Long-Awaited, Global Trial of Fetal Cells for Parkinson’s

July 21, 2014 2:45 pm | by Cynthia Fox | Articles | Comments

In two months, the first of many new Parkinson’s disease (PD) patients will receive a fetal cell transplant. The transplant will mark the end of a voluntary moratorium by many Western nations after complications arose a decade ago. This, combined with news that embryonic stem (ES) cell PD therapies may also near prime-time, made Parkinson’s a big topic at the recent International Society for Stem Cell Research (ISSCR) meeting.

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Metabolic Enzyme Stops Progression of Kidney Cancer

July 21, 2014 1:52 pm | News | Comments

In an analysis of metabolites used by the body to make fuel in normal and cancerous cells in human kidney tissue, a research team identified an enzyme that is key to applying the brakes on tumor growth.              

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New Technique Maps Life's Effects on Our DNA

July 21, 2014 1:39 pm | News | Comments

Researchers have developed a powerful new single-cell technique to help investigate how the environment affects our development and the traits we inherit from our parents. The technique can be used to map all of the 'epigenetic marks' on the DNA within a single cell.

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Missing Sleep May Hurt Your Memory

July 21, 2014 1:32 pm | News | Comments

Lack of sleep, already considered a public health epidemic, can also lead to errors in memory, finds a new study by researchers at Michigan State University and the University of California, Irvine. The study found participants deprived of a night’s sleep were more likely to flub the details of a simulated burglary they were shown in a series of images.

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