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Drawing a Ring Around Antiviral Immunity

April 15, 2014 11:37 am | News | Comments

If you follow cancer biology, then you’ve probably heard of ubiquitin before. In a recent paper researchers provided a structural rationale for how ubiquitin helps RIG-I do its job— and how that might help keep the immune system from getting out of hand.

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Study Says We’re Over the Hill at 24

April 15, 2014 11:28 am | News | Comments

It’s a hard pill to swallow, but if you’re over 24 years of age you’ve already reached your peak in terms of your cognitive motor performance, according to a new Simon Fraser University study. In one of the first social science experiments to rest on big data, researchers investigated when we start to experience an age-related decline in our cognitive motor skills and how we compensate for that.

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Central Ohio Mumps Outbreak Tops 200 Cases

April 14, 2014 8:18 pm | by The Associated Press | News | Comments

A mumps outbreak in central Ohio has grown to more than 200 confirmed cases, public health officials said. A total of 212 cases of the contagious viral illness, with 132 of those linked to Ohio State University, have been reported.    

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MicroRNA Could be Key Target for Bowel Cancer Treatment

April 14, 2014 2:42 pm | News | Comments

A tiny genetic molecule known as a microRNA plays a central role in bowel cancer and could be key to developing new treatments for the disease, a new study concludes. Scientists found that the molecule, called microRNA 135b, is a vital ‘worker’ employed by several important cancer genes to drive the growth of bowel cancers.

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Simplified Filter with Agitation Capability

April 14, 2014 2:40 pm | Product Releases | Comments

The new simplefilter from Powder Systems Limited is now available, with agitation in option, to simplify your filtration and drying process.

Does Germ Plasm Accelerate Evolution?

April 14, 2014 2:38 pm | News | Comments

Scientists at The University of Nottingham have published research that challenges a long held belief about the way certain species of vertebrates evolved. It suggests that genes evolve more rapidly in species containing germ plasm. The results came about as they put to the test a novel theory that early developmental events dramatically alter the vertebrate body plan and the way evolution proceeds.

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Brain Activity May Mark the Beginning of Memories

April 14, 2014 2:30 pm | Videos | Comments

By tracking brain activity when an animal stops to look around its environment, neuroscientists at Johns Hopkins University believe they can mark the birth of a memory. Using lab rats on a circular track, a team of brain scientists, noticed that the rats frequently paused to inspect their environment with head movements as they ran.

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Have Easy-To-Use Cell Sorters Finally Arrived?

April 14, 2014 2:25 pm | by Robert Archer, Ph.D., Bio-Rad Laboratories | White Papers

Patience may be a virtue. But in a lab that’s bustling with scientists conducting meaningful biological research, excessive waiting can be downright frustrating. Such was the case leading up to 2012, when researchers at The University of Chicago Flow Cytometry Core Facility— known as UCFlow— would routinely wait as long as 16 days to be able to sort cells. 

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How a Silly Putty Ingredient Could Advance Stem Cell Therapies

April 14, 2014 2:23 pm | News | Comments

The sponginess of the environment where human embryonic stem cells are growing affects the type of specialized cells they eventually become, a University of Michigan study shows. The researchers coaxed human embryonic stem cells to turn into working spinal cord cells more efficiently by growing the cells on a soft, ultrafine carpet made of a key ingredient in Silly Putty.

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Virus-fighting Genes Linked to Mutations in Cancer

April 14, 2014 2:15 pm | News | Comments

Researchers have found a major piece of genetic evidence that confirms the role of a group of virus-fighting genes in cancer development. The APOBEC family of genes control enzymes that are believed to have evolved in humans to fight off viral infections. Scientists have speculated that these enzymes are responsible for a very distinct signature of mutations that is present in approximately half of all cancer types.

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Finding the Switch: Researchers Create Roadmap for Gene Expression

April 14, 2014 2:07 pm | News | Comments

In a new study, researchers from North Carolina State University, UNC-Chapel Hill and other institutions have taken the first steps toward creating a roadmap that may help scientists narrow down the genetic cause of numerous diseases. Their work also sheds new light on how heredity and environment can affect gene expression.

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Regenerating Muscle in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy: Age Matters

April 14, 2014 1:50 pm | News | Comments

A team of scientists published details of how a class of drugs called “HDACis” drive muscle-cell regeneration in the early stages of dystrophic muscles, but fail to work in late stages. The findings are key to furthering clinical development of HDACis for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), an incurable muscle-wasting disease.

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UAE: Paramedic dies from MERS, others infected

April 11, 2014 2:20 pm | by Adam Schreck - Associated Press - Associated Press | News | Comments

DUBAI, United Arab Emirates (AP) — A paramedic in the United Arab Emirates has died after contracting Middle East respiratory syndrome and five others have tested positive for the virus, the Gulf nation's interior ministry said Friday. The death came as Jordanian health officials reported a new...

Protein Researchers Closing in on the Mystery of Schizophrenia

April 11, 2014 2:20 pm | News | Comments

Schizophrenia is a severe disease for which there is still no effective medical treatment. In an attempt to understand exactly what happens in the brain of schizophrenic people, researchers from the University of Southern Denmark have analyzed proteins in the brains of rats that have been given hallucinogenic drugs.

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How Nerve Cells Flexibly Adapt to Acoustic Signals

April 11, 2014 2:06 pm | News | Comments

Depending on the input signal, neurons generate action potentials either near or far away from the cell body. This flexibility improves our ability to localize sound sources. In order to process acoustic information with high temporal fidelity, nerve cells may flexibly adapt their mode of operation according to the situation.

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