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Bioreactor for Cell Culture, Microbial Fermentation

February 12, 2015 10:19 am | Product Releases | Comments

The BIOSTAT A from Sartorius Stedim Biotech is a compact bioreactor/fermenter designed specifically as an entry-level model for fermentation and cell culture as well as for educational purposes.

Sequence of Genetic Mutations Determines How Cancer Behaves

February 12, 2015 10:15 am | News | Comments

Most of the genetic mutations that cause cancer result from environmental ‘damage’ (for example, through smoking or as a result of over-exposure to sunlight) or from spontaneous errors as cells divide. 

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HPV Vaccination Not Linked to Riskier Sex

February 12, 2015 10:08 am | News | Comments

Receiving the human papillomavirus vaccine does not increase rates of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) in adolescent females. The vaccine, which can prevent cervical cancer in women, has had a low uptake, partly because of concerns about how it will affect adolescent sexual activity.

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Smartphone Apps Just as Accurate as Wearable Devices: Study

February 12, 2015 10:04 am | News | Comments

Although wearable devices have received significant attention for their ability to track an individual’s physical activity, most smartphone applications are just as accurate, according to a new research letter in JAMA.              

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Brain Stents Show Big Promise for Certain Stroke Patients

February 12, 2015 9:53 am | by Associated Press | News | Comments

Stroke experts are reporting a major advance: Stents similar to the ones used to open clogged heart arteries also can be used to clear a blood clot in the brain, greatly lowering the risk a patient will end up disabled.

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Survival for Some Endangered Species Hinges on 'Frozen Zoo'

February 12, 2015 9:47 am | by Associated Press | News | Comments

Whenever an endangered animal dies at the San Diego Zoo, researchers race out, regardless of the hour, to remove its sperm or eggs, maybe a bit of ear or eyeball, and carefully freeze the cells in liquid nitrogen.

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Scientists Overturn Dogma on Bubonic Plague

February 12, 2015 9:40 am | News | Comments

For decades, scientists have thought the bacteria that cause the bubonic plague hijack host cells at the site of a fleabite and are then taken to the lymph nodes, where the bacteria multiply and trigger severe disease. But UNC School of Medicine researchers discovered that this accepted theory is off base. The bacteria do not use host cells; they traffic to lymph nodes on their own and not in great numbers.

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Isolated Systolic Hypertension Indicates Heart Disease Risk for Younger Adults

February 12, 2015 9:32 am | News | Comments

High systolic blood pressure – the top number in a blood pressure reading – has long been considered an indicator of cardiovascular disease risk for adults over 50. But now a new Northwestern Medicine study suggests that it’s also important for younger adults.

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Common Biomarkers of Sleep Debt Found in Humans, Rats: Study

February 12, 2015 9:10 am | News | Comments

Stating that sleep is an essential biological process seems as obvious as saying that the sun rises every morning. Yet, researchers' understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying the effects of sleep loss is still in its earliest stages.

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2D Coded Sample Storage Packs

February 10, 2015 5:21 pm | Product Releases | Comments

Micronic Starterpacks contain everything needed to start using 2D coded sample storage tubes, enabling laboratory workers to ensure a secure sample logistics system and eliminate the costly possibility of false sample identities.

Serotonin-Deficient Brains More Vulnerable to Social Stress

February 10, 2015 5:17 pm | by Duke University | News | Comments

Mice genetically deficient in serotonin—a crucial brain chemical implicated in clinical depression—are more vulnerable than their normal littermates to social stressors, according to a Duke study appearing this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

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Grey Matter Loss from Smoking May be Reversible: Study

February 10, 2015 5:12 pm | News | Comments

Damage to the brain's outer layer caused by smoking may be reversible after quitting, but it could take years, a study said. Brain scans of 500 Scottish septuagenarians confirmed a link between smoking and an acceleration of age-related thinning of the cortex—the outer layer of grey matter, researchers reported.

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Plant Extract Fights Brain Tumor

February 10, 2015 5:06 pm | by Max Planck Society | News | Comments

Silibinin has an outstanding safety profile in humans and is currently used for the treatment of liver disease and poisoning.                                                     

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Babies Identify Complex Social Situations

February 10, 2015 5:02 pm | by University of Missouri-Columbia | News | Comments

In the social world, people constantly gather information through visual cues that are used to evaluate others and interact. A new study from researchers at the University of Missouri determined that babies can make sense of complex social situations, and that they expect people to behave appropriately.     

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Screening Tool Could Speed Ovarian Cancer Drug Development

February 10, 2015 4:56 pm | by University of Chicago | News | Comments

University of Chicago Medicine researchers have built a model system that uses multiple cell types from patients to rapidly test compounds that could block the early steps in ovarian cancer metastasis. Their three-dimensional cell-culture system, adapted for high-throughput screening, has enabled them to identify small molecules that can inhibit adhesion and invasion, preventing ovarian cancers from spreading to nearby tissues.

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