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Newly Discovered Heart Molecule Could Lead to Effective Treatment for Heart Failure

August 11, 2014 2:04 pm | News | Comments

Researchers have discovered a previously unknown cardiac molecule that could provide a key to treating, and preventing, heart failure. The newly discovered molecule provides the heart with a tool to block a protein that orchestrates genetic disruptions when the heart is subjected to stress, such as high blood pressure.

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Like Cling Wrap, New Biomaterial Can Coat Burn Wounds and Block Infection

August 11, 2014 2:01 pm | News | Comments

Wrapping wound dressings around fingers and toes can be tricky, but for burn victims, guarding them against infection is critical. Today, scientists are reporting the development of novel, ultrathin coatings called nanosheets that can cling to the body’s most difficult-to-protect contours and keep bacteria at bay.

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Solving a Sticky Problem with Fetal Surgery Using Glue Inspired by Sandcastle Worm

August 11, 2014 1:48 pm | News | Comments

In creating an adhesive patterned after glue produced by the lowly underwater sandcastle worm, researchers are reporting today that they may have solved the problem of premature births that sometimes result from fetal surgery. It also could open up numerous opportunities to safely perform more complex fetal surgeries in the future.

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Making Cashews Safer for Those with Allergies

August 11, 2014 1:37 pm | News | Comments

For the millions of adults and children in the U.S. who have to shun nuts to avoid an allergic reaction, help could be on the way. Scientists are now developing a method to process cashews—and potentially other nuts—that could make them safer to eat for people who are allergic to them.

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AIDS activist takes up a new fight: defending FDA

August 11, 2014 12:21 pm | by Matthew Perrone - AP Health Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

As an AIDS activist in the early 1990s, Gregg Gonsalves traveled to Washington to challenge the Food and Drug Administration. Gonsalves was part of the confrontational group Act Up, which staged protests outside the FDA's headquarters, disrupted its public meetings and pressured its leaders into...

Ethical questions emerge over who gets Ebola drug

August 11, 2014 9:21 am | by By Ciaran Giles - Associated Press - Associated Press | News | Comments

In a development that raises a host of ethical issues, Spain announced it had obtained a scarce U.S.-made experimental Ebola drug to treat a Spanish missionary priest infected with the killer virus. The Health Ministry statement came less than a week after the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and...

Nigeria confirms 1 more Ebola case

August 11, 2014 7:24 am | by Bashir Adigun - Associated Press - Associated Press | News | Comments

Nigeria has one more confirmed Ebola case, a nurse who was treating the Liberian-American who flew into the country with the disease and died of it last month, the health minister announced Monday. The nurse tested positive for the Ebola virus over the weekend, Health Minister Onyebuchi Chukwu...

Spanish Ebola patient gets experimental drug

August 11, 2014 5:20 am | by The Associated Press | News | Comments

Spain says it has imported a U.S.-made experimental drug to treat a Spanish missionary priest who was evacuated from Liberia last week after testing positive for Ebola. A Health Ministry statement Monday said the ZMapp drug, made by Mapp Biopharmaceutical Inc. of San Diego, was obtained in Geneva...

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25 Years Ago, A Different Ebola Outbreak in Va.

August 10, 2014 10:20 am | by Matthew Barakat - Associated Press - Associated Press | News | Comments

It had all the makings of a public-health horror story: an outbreak of a wildly deadly virus on the doorstep of the nation's capital, with dozens of lab monkeys dead, multiple people testing positive, and no precedent in this country on how to contain it. Americans' introduction to the Ebola virus came 25 years ago in an office park near Washington Dulles International Airport.

HIV infections rise, thwart Brazil's AIDS efforts

August 9, 2014 3:21 am | by Adriana Gomez Licon - Associated Press - Associated Press | News | Comments

The devastating news didn't make sense to Brazilian Pierre Freitaz. How was it possible that, at age 17, he was infected with HIV if his only boyfriend seemed fit and healthy? Freitaz confesses he knew little about the virus when he was diagnosed in 2004. He didn't understand the difference...

Ga. Peanut plant chief: we faked salmonella tests

August 8, 2014 4:21 pm | by Russ Bynum - Associated Press - Associated Press | News | Comments

A Georgia peanut plant manager testified Friday that his company had been shipping contaminated nuts with fake documents showing them to be salmonella-free before the plant was identified as the source of a nationwide outbreak that killed nine Americans and sickened more than 700. "In my mind, I...

Bioscience Technology This Week #6: What Can Bears Teach Us About Diabetes?

August 8, 2014 1:48 pm | Videos | Comments

In this episode of Bioscience Technology This Week, Rob Fee reports on the findings that researchers studying diabetes learned by observing grizzly bears. He also discusses a stem cell therapy that could lead to new and effective spinal cord injury treatments.

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Can People with Type 2 Diabetes Live Longer?

August 8, 2014 1:26 pm | News | Comments

A large-scale University-led study involving more than 180,000 people shows that patients treated with a drug widely prescribed for type 2 diabetes can live longer than people without the condition. The findings indicate that a drug known as metformin, used to control glucose levels in the body and already known to exhibit anticancer properties, could offer prognostic and prophylactic benefits to people without diabetes.

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Cell Signaling Pathway Linked to Obesity, Type 2 Diabetes

August 8, 2014 1:19 pm | News | Comments

A Purdue University study shows that Notch signaling, a key biological pathway tied to development and cell communication, also plays an important role in the onset of obesity and Type 2 diabetes, a discovery that offers new targets for treatment.

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Automated PCR Set-up

August 8, 2014 1:13 pm | Product Releases | Comments

Tecan offers the TouchTools PCR Wizard, an add-on to Freedom EVOware offering automation of PCR reaction set-up on Freedom EVO platforms. This new tool simplifies the set-up of applications—including end-point, real-time and multiplex PCR, sequencing, genotyping and gene expression, as well as pathogen and mutagenesis detection.

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