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Regenerating Muscle in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy: Age Matters

April 14, 2014 1:50 pm | News | Comments

A team of scientists published details of how a class of drugs called “HDACis” drive muscle-cell regeneration in the early stages of dystrophic muscles, but fail to work in late stages. The findings are key to furthering clinical development of HDACis for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), an incurable muscle-wasting disease.

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UAE: Paramedic dies from MERS, others infected

April 11, 2014 2:20 pm | by Adam Schreck - Associated Press - Associated Press | News | Comments

DUBAI, United Arab Emirates (AP) — A paramedic in the United Arab Emirates has died after contracting Middle East respiratory syndrome and five others have tested positive for the virus, the Gulf nation's interior ministry said Friday. The death came as Jordanian health officials reported a new...

Protein Researchers Closing in on the Mystery of Schizophrenia

April 11, 2014 2:20 pm | News | Comments

Schizophrenia is a severe disease for which there is still no effective medical treatment. In an attempt to understand exactly what happens in the brain of schizophrenic people, researchers from the University of Southern Denmark have analyzed proteins in the brains of rats that have been given hallucinogenic drugs.

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How Nerve Cells Flexibly Adapt to Acoustic Signals

April 11, 2014 2:06 pm | News | Comments

Depending on the input signal, neurons generate action potentials either near or far away from the cell body. This flexibility improves our ability to localize sound sources. In order to process acoustic information with high temporal fidelity, nerve cells may flexibly adapt their mode of operation according to the situation.

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Scientists Grow Cartilage to Reconstruct Nose

April 11, 2014 1:54 pm | News | Comments

Scientists at the University of Basel report first ever successful nose reconstruction surgery using cartilage grown in the laboratory. Cartilage cells were extracted from the patient’s nasal septum, multiplied and expanded onto a collagen membrane. The so-called engineered cartilage was then shaped according to the defect and implanted.

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How the Brain Pays Attention

April 11, 2014 1:46 pm | Videos | Comments

Picking out a face in the crowd is a complicated task: Your brain has to retrieve the memory of the face you’re seeking, then hold it in place while scanning the crowd, paying special attention to finding a match. A new study reveals how the brain achieves this type of focused attention on faces or other objects.

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Enzyme ‘Wrench’ Could Be Key to Stronger, More Effective Antibiotics

April 11, 2014 1:21 pm | News | Comments

Builders and factory workers know that getting a job done right requires precision and specialized tools. The same is true when you’re building antibiotic compounds at the molecular level. New findings from North Carolina State University may turn an enzyme that acts as a specialized “wrench” in antibiotic assembly into a set of wrenches that will allow for greater customization.

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Tumor-suppressor Connects with Histone Protein to Hinder Gene Expression

April 11, 2014 1:06 pm | News | Comments

A tumor-suppressing protein acts as a dimmer switch to dial down gene expression.  It does this by reading a chemical message attached to another protein that’s tightly intertwined with DNA, a team led by scientists at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center reports. The findings provide evidence in support of the “histone code" hypothesis.

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Researchers Discover Possible New Target To Attack Flu Virus

April 11, 2014 12:52 pm | News | Comments

Scientists at The University of Texas at Austin have discovered that a protein produced by the influenza A virus helps it outwit one of our body's natural defense mechanisms. That makes the protein a potentially good target for antiviral drugs directed against the influenza A virus.

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Fungal disease fatal to bats spreads to half of US

April 10, 2014 6:20 pm | by John Flesher - Associated Press - Associated Press | News | Comments

A fungal disease that has killed millions of North American bats is spreading and now has been detected in half of the United States, officials said Thursday. Wildlife agencies in Michigan and Wisconsin said they had confirmed diagnoses of white-nose syndrome in tested bats, further evidence of...

Researchers Looking to Create New Bone Tissue Generation Technique

April 10, 2014 2:50 pm | News | Comments

UT Arlington and Texas Health Arlington Memorial Hospital are investigating whether bone grown from the body’s own stem cells can replace traditional types of bone grafting. The process, which has been successful in previous lab experiments, uses biodegradable polymer scaffolding material and bone morphogenetic protein, or BMP, which was inserted into the abdomen of mice to attract stem cells that in turn produced bone.

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Synthetic Collagen Promotes Natural Clotting

April 10, 2014 2:40 pm | News | Comments

Synthetic collagen invented at Rice University may help wounds heal by directing the natural clotting of blood. The material, KOD, mimics natural collagen, a fibrous protein that binds cells together into organs and tissues. It could improve upon commercial sponges or therapies based on naturally derived porcine or bovine-derived collagen now used to aid healing during or after surgery.

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Genetic Defect May Confer Resistance to Certain Viral Infections

April 10, 2014 2:27 pm | News | Comments

A study reports that a rare genetic disease, while depleting patients of infection-fighting antibodies, may actually protect them from certain severe or recurrent viral infections. Researchers found that HIV and influenza viruses replicate in the cells of people with congenital disorder of glycosylation type IIb (CDG-IIb) at a much lower rate than in healthy donor cells, creating fewer and less infectious viruses.

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Bone Marrow Stem Cells Show Promise in Stroke Treatment

April 10, 2014 2:19 pm | News | Comments

Stem cells culled from bone marrow may prove beneficial in stroke recovery. In an analysis of published research, neurologist Dr. Steven Cramer and biomedical engineer Weian Zhao identified 46 studies that examined the use of mesenchymal stromal cells—a type of multipotent adult stem cells mostly processed from bone marrow—in animal models of stroke. They found MSCs to be significantly better than control therapy in 44 of the studies.

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More Insights from Tissue Samples

April 10, 2014 2:11 pm | News | Comments

A new way of preparing patient tissue for analyses might soon become the new standard. Researchers discovered that the so-called HOPE method allows tissue samples to be treated such that they do not only meet the requirements of clinical histology, but can still be characterized later on by modern methods of proteomics.

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