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Sugar Tied to Fatal Heart Woes; Soda's a Culprit

February 3, 2014 6:07 pm | by Lindsey Tanner - AP Medical Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

Could too much sugar be deadly? The biggest study of its kind suggests the answer is yes, at least when it comes to fatal heart problems. It doesn't take all that much extra sugar, hidden in many processed foods, to substantially raise the risk, the researchers found, and most Americans eat more than the safest amount.

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BioTelemetry prevails in court, acquires rival

February 3, 2014 5:07 pm | by The Associated Press | News | Comments

Shares of wireless medical device maker BioTelemetry jumped Monday after the company announced it had prevailed in court — and subsequently acquired — a rival wireless technology company. The maker of remote heart monitors said it won a key victory in a patent dispute over its technology with...

Canada approves Merck grass allergy immunotherapy

February 3, 2014 4:07 pm | by The Associated Press | News | Comments

WHITEHOUSE STATION, N.J. (AP) — Merck & Co. says it's won its first approval for its new immunotherapy tablet for grass allergies, from regulators in Canada. The drug, called Grastek, gradually reduced allergic reactions to grass pollen, by desensitizing the immune system to the substance...

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Health Day: U.S. teens eat too much salt, hiking obesity risk, study says

February 3, 2014 3:12 pm | by Georgia Regents University | News | Comments

Health Day: Feb. 3, 2014 American teens are taking in as much dietary salt as adults, far exceeding guidelines on healthy limits for daily consumption, new research warns. Dr. Haidong Zhu, an assistant professor of pediatrics at the Institute of Public and Preventive Health at Georgia Regents University, and her colleagues reported their findings online Feb. 3 in the journal Pediatrics. The investigation tracked the week-long eating habits of more than 760 black and white high school kids. It found that, on average, teens now ingest a whopping 3,280 milligrams (mg) of sodiu...

Ligand, Glaxo drug gets special FDA designation

February 3, 2014 3:07 pm | by The Associated Press | News | Comments

Ligand Pharmaceuticals said Monday that its drug Promacta has received "breakthrough" designation by U.S. regulators for a new use in patients with a rare form of anemia. Ligand and its partner GlaxoSmithKline already market the pill to treat chronic hepatitis C and a rare condition called...

PDL Biopharma says it settled Roche royalty fight

February 3, 2014 3:07 pm | by The Associated Press | News | Comments

PDL Biopharma said Monday it agreed to settle its disputes with Swiss drugmaker Roche over royalty rates on a group of drugs PDL helped develop. The dispute concerned four cancer drugs: Avastin, Herceptin, Kadcyla, and Perjeta; also involved were the asthma treatment Xolair, and Lucentis, an eye...

FDA approves pill camera to screen colon

February 3, 2014 1:07 pm | by Matthew Perrone - AP Health Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

Given Imaging Ltd. said Monday it has won U.S. approval for an ingestible pill camera that can help doctors screen the large intestine for polyps and other early signs of colon cancer. The Israeli company's technology, developed from missile defense systems, uses a battery-powered camera to take...

Chemical Stem Cell Signature Predicts Treatment Response for Acute Myeloid Leukemia

February 3, 2014 1:04 pm | by Einstein | News | Comments

February 3, 2014 — (Bronx, NY) — Researchers at Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University and Montefiore Medical Center have found a chemical “signature” in blood-forming stem cells that predicts whether patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) will respond to chemotherapy.

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Pfizer breast cancer drug hits midstage study goal

February 3, 2014 12:07 pm | by The Associated Press | News | Comments

Drugmaker Pfizer Inc. says a midstage study of its experimental drug for advanced breast cancer, palbociclib (pal-boh-SEYE'-clib), met the main goals. The world's second-biggest drugmaker says its drug, combined with another medicine called letrozole (LET'-rah-zole), increased the time patients...

Forest Labs completes $2.9B purchase of Aptalis

February 3, 2014 12:07 pm | by The Associated Press | News | Comments

Forest Labs said Monday it completed its $2.9 billion purchase of Aptalis, a company that makes treatments for gastrointestinal problems and cystic fibrosis. Forest said the acquisition of Aptalis will give it about $700 million in revenue in its next fiscal year. The deal expands its cystic...

Study Shows Autistic Brains Create More Information at Rest

February 3, 2014 12:01 pm | News | Comments

New research finds that the brains of autistic children generate more information at rest – a 42% increase on average. The study offers a scientific explanation for the most typical characteristic of autism – withdrawal into one’s own inner world. The excess production of information may explain a child’s detachment from their environment.

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Study Shows Autistic Brains Create More Information at Rest

February 3, 2014 12:01 pm | News | Comments

New research finds that the brains of autistic children generate more information at rest – a 42% increase on average. The study offers a scientific explanation for the most typical characteristic of autism – withdrawal into one’s own inner world. The excess production of information may explain a child’s detachment from their environment.

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Custom Phospho-Specific Antibody Production Service

February 3, 2014 12:00 pm | Product Releases | Comments

AMSBIO has developed a custom phospho-specific antibody production service that is both reliable and produces highly specific quality antisera.

Red Alert: Body Kills ‘Spontaneous’ Blood Cancers on a Daily Basis

February 3, 2014 11:54 am | News | Comments

Immune cells undergo ‘spontaneous’ changes on a daily basis that could lead to cancers if not for the diligent surveillance of our immune system, scientists have found. The research team from the Walter and Eliza Hall Institute found that the immune system was responsible for eliminating potentially cancerous immune B cells in their early stages, before they developed into B-cell lymphomas (also known as non-Hodgkin’s lymphomas).

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Making Your Brain Social

February 3, 2014 11:48 am | News | Comments

In many people with autism and other neurodevelopmental disorders, different parts of the brain don’t talk to each other very well. Scientists have now identified, for the first time, a way in which this decreased functional connectivity can come about.

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