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Autism Linked to Flawed Prenatal Brain Growth

March 27, 2014 11:46 am | by Lindsey Tanner - AP Medical Writer | Videos | Comments

A small study that examined brains from children who died found abnormal patterns of cell growth in autistic children. The research bolsters evidence that something before birth might cause autism, at least in some cases.         

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Breaking News: Growing Concerns Over STAP Cell Sources

March 27, 2014 10:25 am | by Cynthia Fox | Blogs | Comments

Cloning pioneer Teru Wakayama found two STAP stem cell batches made for recent Nature STAP papers were apparently not derived from a 129 mouse strain, as he was told, but F1 and B6 strains. While the erroneous data, which appeared in one of the papers, does not affect the works' main thrust, it is spurring calls for reviews of other STAP stem cell sources.

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Britain: 2 people catch tuberculosis from pet cat

March 27, 2014 10:15 am | by The Associated Press | News | Comments

England's public health agency says two people have caught tuberculosis from a pet cat, the first time the bacterial disease has been documented to spread from cat to human. In a report published Thursday, Public Health England said it concluded TB samples taken from the cat and from two people...

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India is polio-free after 3 years with no new case

March 27, 2014 8:19 am | by The Associated Press | News | Comments

The World Health Organization has formally declared India to be polio-free, with no new cases of the disease detected in the country in the past three years. WHO said Thursday that the milestone means it now considers the entire Southeast Asian region, home to a quarter of the world's population,...

Baxter splitting into 2 separate businesses

March 27, 2014 8:19 am | by The Associated Press | News | Comments

Baxter International Inc. is splitting itself into two separate businesses — one focusing on biopharmaceuticals and the other on other medical products. The biopharmaceuticals business includes treatments for hemophilia and other bleeding disorders and blood plasma therapies used to treat immune...

FDA panel narrowly backs DNA colon cancer test

March 26, 2014 6:18 pm | by The Associated Press | News | Comments

A panel of Food and Drug Administration advisers has narrowly backed an experimental blood test that uses patients' DNA to help screen for colon cancer. The FDA's genetic experts voted 5-4, with one abstention, that the benefits of Epigenomics' test outweigh the risks. The vote amounts to a...

Migraine Attacks Increase Following Stress "Let-Down"

March 26, 2014 5:20 pm | by Einstein | News | Comments

NEW YORK (March 26, 2014) – Migraine sufferers who experienced reduced stress from one day to the next are at significantly increased risk of migraine onset on the subsequent day, according to a new study conducted by researchers at the Montefiore Headache Center and Albert Einstein College...

25 drug companies to phase out animal antibiotics

March 26, 2014 4:18 pm | by Mary Clare Jalonick - Associated Press - Associated Press | News | Comments

The Food and Drug Administration says 25 pharmaceutical companies are voluntarily phasing out the use of antibiotics for growth promotion in animals processed for meat. Citing a potential threat to public health, the agency in December asked 26 companies to voluntarily stop labeling drugs...

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Hospital infections less common, new report says

March 26, 2014 3:18 pm | by The Associated Press | News | Comments

A new report suggests hospital infections are not as common as previously thought — but still 1 in 25 patients are infected. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention released the estimates Wednesday. It's considered the best data yet on infections patients pick up in the hospital. The...

Researchers Present Comprehensive “Roadmap” of Blood Cells

March 26, 2014 2:30 pm | News | Comments

Research published online in Blood presents an unprecedented look at five unique blood cells in the human body, pinpointing the location of key genetic regulators in these cells and providing a new tool that may help scientists to identify how blood cells form and shed light on the etiology of blood diseases.

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Cancer Biologists Link Tumor Suppressor Gene to Stem Cells

March 26, 2014 2:09 pm | News | Comments

Just as archeologists try to decipher ancient tablets to discern their meaning, UT Southwestern Medical Center cancer biologists are working to decode the purpose of an ancient gene considered one of the most important in cancer research. The p53 gene appears to be involved in signaling other cells instrumental in stopping tumor development. But the p53 gene predates cancer, so scientists are uncertain what its original function is.

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Scientists Discover Bacterial Resistance to Improve Biofuel Production

March 26, 2014 1:59 pm | News | Comments

Resistance is not futile when it comes to a new method to more efficiently convert biomass to biofuels. New research by scientists from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in conjunction with the Joint BioEnergy Institute (JBEI) suggests that a type of bacterial resistance may provide more efficient production of biofuels.

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New Clue to Autism Found Inside Brain Cells

March 26, 2014 1:35 pm | News | Comments

The problems people with autism have with memory formation, higher-level thinking and social interactions may be partially attributable to the activity of receptors inside brain cells, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have learned.

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Model Predicts Blood Glucose Levels 30 Minutes Later

March 26, 2014 12:26 pm | News | Comments

A mathematical model created by Penn State researchers can predict with more than 90 percent accuracy the blood glucose levels of individuals with type 1 diabetes up to 30 minutes in advance of imminent changes in their levels—plenty of time to take preventative action.

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Nanotube Coating Helps Shrink Mass Spectrometers

March 26, 2014 12:16 pm | News | Comments

Nanotechnology is advancing tools that perform on-the-spot chemical analysis for a range of applications including medical testing, explosives detection, and food safety. Researchers found that when paper used to collect a sample was coated with carbon nanotubes, the voltage required was 1,000 times reduced, the signal was sharpened and the equipment was able to capture far more delicate molecules.

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