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Limiting a Certain Protein in the Brain Reverses Alzheimer's Symptoms in Mice

April 15, 2014 | Comments

Limiting a certain protein in the brain reverses Alzheimer’s symptoms in mice, report neuroscientists at MIT’s Picower Institute for Learning and Memory. Researchers found that the overproduction of the protein known as p25 may be the culprit behind the sticky protein-fragment clusters that build up in the brains of Alzheimer's patients.

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Breaking News: Marijuana Use Linked to Brain Abnormalities

April 16, 2014 8:30 am | Comments

Young adults who used marijuana only recreationally showed significant abnormalities in two brain regions that are important in emotion and motivation. This is the first study to show casual use of marijuana is related to major brain changes.  

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2014 R&D 100 Awards Entry Deadline Extended

April 15, 2014 3:07 pm | Comments

The editors of R&D Magazine have announced that there is still plenty time to prepare your Entry Form for the 2014 R&D 100 Awards: Friday, May 2 is the new deadline.                      

DNA alternative to Pap smear sparks medical debate

April 15, 2014 12:20 pm | by The Associated Press | Comments

A high-tech screening tool for cervical cancer is facing pushback from more than a dozen patient groups, who warn that the genetic test could displace a simpler, cheaper and more established mainstay of women's health: the Pap smear. The new test comes from Roche and uses DNA to detect the human...

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Young Dads at High Risk of Depression, Too

April 15, 2014 12:07 pm | Comments

Depression can hit young fathers hard- with symptoms increasing dramatically during some of the most important years of their children’s lives, a new study has found.                        

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First Volunteers to Receive Blood Cultured from Stem Cells in 2016

April 15, 2014 12:01 pm | Comments

The first human volunteer will receive red blood cells cultured in the laboratory within the next three years, as part of a long-term research program funded by the Wellcome Trust.                    

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Drawing a Ring Around Antiviral Immunity

April 15, 2014 11:37 am | Comments

If you follow cancer biology, then you’ve probably heard of ubiquitin before. In a recent paper researchers provided a structural rationale for how ubiquitin helps RIG-I do its job— and how that might help keep the immune system from getting out of hand.

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Central Ohio Mumps Outbreak Tops 200 Cases

April 14, 2014 8:18 pm | by The Associated Press | Comments

A mumps outbreak in central Ohio has grown to more than 200 confirmed cases, public health officials said. A total of 212 cases of the contagious viral illness, with 132 of those linked to Ohio State University, have been reported.    

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MicroRNA Could be Key Target for Bowel Cancer Treatment

April 14, 2014 2:42 pm | Comments

A tiny genetic molecule known as a microRNA plays a central role in bowel cancer and could be key to developing new treatments for the disease, a new study concludes. Scientists found that the molecule, called microRNA 135b, is a vital ‘worker’ employed by several important cancer genes to drive the growth of bowel cancers.

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Does Germ Plasm Accelerate Evolution?

April 14, 2014 2:38 pm | Comments

Scientists at The University of Nottingham have published research that challenges a long held belief about the way certain species of vertebrates evolved. It suggests that genes evolve more rapidly in species containing germ plasm. The results came about as they put to the test a novel theory that early developmental events dramatically alter the vertebrate body plan and the way evolution proceeds.

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How a Silly Putty Ingredient Could Advance Stem Cell Therapies

April 14, 2014 2:23 pm | Comments

The sponginess of the environment where human embryonic stem cells are growing affects the type of specialized cells they eventually become, a University of Michigan study shows. The researchers coaxed human embryonic stem cells to turn into working spinal cord cells more efficiently by growing the cells on a soft, ultrafine carpet made of a key ingredient in Silly Putty.

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Virus-fighting Genes Linked to Mutations in Cancer

April 14, 2014 2:15 pm | Comments

Researchers have found a major piece of genetic evidence that confirms the role of a group of virus-fighting genes in cancer development. The APOBEC family of genes control enzymes that are believed to have evolved in humans to fight off viral infections. Scientists have speculated that these enzymes are responsible for a very distinct signature of mutations that is present in approximately half of all cancer types.

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Finding the Switch: Researchers Create Roadmap for Gene Expression

April 14, 2014 2:07 pm | Comments

In a new study, researchers from North Carolina State University, UNC-Chapel Hill and other institutions have taken the first steps toward creating a roadmap that may help scientists narrow down the genetic cause of numerous diseases. Their work also sheds new light on how heredity and environment can affect gene expression.

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Regenerating Muscle in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy: Age Matters

April 14, 2014 1:50 pm | Comments

A team of scientists published details of how a class of drugs called “HDACis” drive muscle-cell regeneration in the early stages of dystrophic muscles, but fail to work in late stages. The findings are key to furthering clinical development of HDACis for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), an incurable muscle-wasting disease.

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UAE: Paramedic dies from MERS, others infected

April 11, 2014 2:20 pm | by Adam Schreck - Associated Press - Associated Press | Comments

DUBAI, United Arab Emirates (AP) — A paramedic in the United Arab Emirates has died after contracting Middle East respiratory syndrome and five others have tested positive for the virus, the Gulf nation's interior ministry said Friday. The death came as Jordanian health officials reported a new...

Protein Researchers Closing in on the Mystery of Schizophrenia

April 11, 2014 2:20 pm | Comments

Schizophrenia is a severe disease for which there is still no effective medical treatment. In an attempt to understand exactly what happens in the brain of schizophrenic people, researchers from the University of Southern Denmark have analyzed proteins in the brains of rats that have been given hallucinogenic drugs.

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