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Research Could Lead to Next-Gen Cancer Therapy

March 10, 2016 | by Ryan Bushey, Digital Editor | Comments

The scientists studied two lung cancer patients where they found immune cells in the tumors that corresponded with the aforementioned antigens.

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Can We Extend Healthspan by Altering the Perception of Food?

May 27, 2016 9:48 am | by Buck Institute for Research on Aging | Comments

Researchers have shown a new effect on aging via a small drug-like molecule that alters the perception of food in the nematode C. elegans. Researchers "tricked" the worm's metabolism into a state of caloric restriction, extending the animal's lifespan by 50 percent.

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New Technique Captures Activity of an Entire Brain in a Snapshot

May 27, 2016 9:44 am | by Rockefeller University | Comments

When it comes to measuring brain activity, scientists have tools that can take a precise look at a small slice of the brain (less than one cubic millimeter), or a blurred look at a larger area. Now, researchers have described a new technique that combines the best of both worlds--it captures a detailed snapshot of global activity in the mouse brain.

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Automating DNA Origami Opens Door to Many New Uses

May 27, 2016 9:40 am | by Helen Knight, MIT News Office | Comments

Researchers can build complex, nanometer-scale structures of almost any shape and form, using strands of DNA. But these particles must be designed by hand, in a complex and laborious process. Now a team of researchers has developed an algorithm that can build these DNA nanoparticles automatically.

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CDC Urges Speed on Zika as House Moves to Negotiate Funding

May 27, 2016 9:35 am | by Andrew Taylor and Lauran Neergaard, Associated Press | Comments

The U.S. must act more quickly to protect pregnant women from birth defect-causing Zika, a top health official said Thursday even as the House left town for its Memorial Day recess with no visible progress toward a congressional compromise on emergency funding to battle the virus.

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Report: 1st US Case of Germ Resistant to Last Resort Drug

May 27, 2016 9:31 am | by Mike Stobbe, AP Medical Writer | Comments

For the first time, a U.S. patient has been infected with bacteria resistant to an antibiotic used as a last resort treatment, scientists said Thursday.

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Study: Brain Scans Reveal Hidden Consciousness in Patients

May 27, 2016 9:28 am | by Malcolm Ritter, AP Science Writer | Comments

A standard brain scanning technique is showing promise for helping doctors distinguish between patients in a vegetative state and those with hidden signs of consciousness.

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Development of Gut Microbes and Gut Immunity Linked

May 27, 2016 9:25 am | by Washington University in St. Louis | Comments

Studying twins from birth through age 2, scientists have shown that the gut’s immune system develops in sync with the gut’s tens of trillions of microbes.

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French Health Ministry Faults Companies for Fatal Drug Trial

May 27, 2016 9:16 am | by Seth Augenstein, Digital Reporter | Comments

The French Health Ministry found the companies at fault for a drug trial earlier this year that killed one and hospitalized five others.

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Mismatch of Vascular and Neural Responses Suggests Limits of fMRI

May 26, 2016 10:11 am | by Medical University of South Carolina | Comments

Investigators report that, during sensory stimulation, increases in blood flow are not precisely "tuned" to local neural activity, challenging the long-held view that vascular and local neural responses are tightly coupled.

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Prenatal Fruit Consumption Boosts Babies' Cognitive Development

May 26, 2016 10:07 am | by University of Alberta | Comments

A new study found that mothers who consumed more fruit during pregnancy gave birth to children who performed better on developmental testing at one year of age.

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Human Amyloid-beta Acts as Natural Antibiotic in Brains of Animal Models

May 26, 2016 10:03 am | by Massachusetts General Hospital | Comments

A new study provides additional evidence that amyloid-beta protein - which is deposited in the form of beta-amyloid plaques in the brains of patients with Alzheimer's disease - is a normal part of the innate immune system, the body's first-line defense against infection.

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Itching for No Reason? Immune System May be at Fault

May 26, 2016 9:59 am | by Washington University in St. Louis | Comments

People who suffer itching with no clear cause may have previously unrecognized immune system defects. In a small study of such patients, researchers identified immune system irregularities that may prompt the urge to scratch.

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Scientists Illuminate a Hidden Regulator in Gene Transcription

May 26, 2016 9:51 am | by Jennifer Chu, MIT News Office | Comments

New super-resolution technique visualizes important role of short-lived enzyme clusters.

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Is Aging Inevitable? Not Necessarily for Sea Urchins

May 26, 2016 9:47 am | by Mount Desert Island Biological Laboratory | Comments

Researchers are studying the regenerative capacity of sea urchins in hopes that a deeper understanding of the process of regeneration, which governs the regeneration of aging tissues as well as lost or damaged body parts, will lead to a deeper understanding of the aging process in humans, with whom sea urchins share a close genetic relationship.

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