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Memories' Emotional Associations Can be Reversed

August 28, 2014 | Comments

A new study revealed the brain circuit that controls how memories become linked with positive or negative emotions, and researchers found that they could reverse the emotional association of specific memories by manipulating brain cells with optogenetics.

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Marijuana's hazy contribution to highway deaths

September 2, 2014 3:23 am | by Joan Lowy - Associated Press - Associated Press | Comments

Public officials and safety advocates worry there will be more drivers high on pot and a big increase in traffic deaths as states liberalize marijuana laws. It's not clear, though, whether those concerns are merited. Researchers are divided on the question. Studies of marijuana's effects show...

Action-packed TV might make you snack more: Study

September 1, 2014 6:23 pm | by Lindsey Tanner - AP Medical Writer - Associated Press | Comments

Could action-packed TV fare make you fat? That's the implication of a new study that found people snacked more watching fast-paced television than viewing a more leisurely-paced talk show. THE SKINNY: Cornell University researchers randomly assigned almost 100 undergraduates to watch one of three...

Museum to display 6,500-year-old human skeleton

September 1, 2014 4:23 pm | by The Associated Press | Comments

The public will soon get to see an ancient human skeleton recently rediscovered in a Philadelphia museum's storage room. Visitors can look at the 6,500-year-old remains beginning Saturday at the University of Pennsylvania's Penn Museum. Archaeologists first excavated the specimen from southern...

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Chefs, breeders pair up to produce tastier veggies

September 1, 2014 4:23 pm | by M.l. Johnson - Associated Press - Associated Press | Comments

There's a good chance that many of the suddenly trendy vegetables that foodies latch on to in the next decade will benefit from research at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. While plant breeders at many public universities focus on improving field corn, soybeans and other crops used in food...

Senegal monitors contacts of 1st Ebola patient

September 1, 2014 2:22 pm | by Babacar Dione - Associated Press - Associated Press | Comments

Senegalese authorities on Monday were monitoring everyone who was in contact with a student infected with Ebola who crossed into the country, and who has lost three family members to the disease. An Ebola outbreak in West Africa has killed more than 1,500 people in Guinea, Liberia, Sierra Leone...

19 new dengue cases in Japan, linked to Tokyo park

September 1, 2014 7:23 am | by The Associated Press | Comments

Japan is urging local authorities to be on the lookout for further outbreaks of dengue fever, after confirming another 19 cases that were contracted at a popular local park in downtown Tokyo. The cases announced Monday raise to 22 the number of dengue infections thought to have been contracted...

Liberia extends stay-home order amid Ebola crisis

September 1, 2014 6:22 am | by Jonathan Paye-layleh - Associated Press - Associated Press | Comments

Liberia's president ordered most civil servants to stay home another month in an effort to stop the spread of the deadly Ebola virus, according to a statement released Monday. President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf ordered non-essential workers not to come to work and promised that all government...

WHO: Senegal Ebola case 'a top priority emergency'

August 31, 2014 7:22 am | by The Associated Press | Comments

The World Health Organization says it is treating Senegal's first confirmed Ebola case "as a top priority emergency." In a statement distributed Sunday, the WHO said it would address as quickly as possible Senegal's "urgent need" for support and supplies including personal protective equipment...

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Liberian Ebola survivor praises experimental drug

August 30, 2014 9:23 am | by Jonathan Paye-layleh - Associated Press - Associated Press | Comments

A Liberian health worker who recovered from Ebola after receiving an experimental drug urged the manufacturer to speed up its production and send it to Africa, while crowds celebrated in the streets Saturday after authorities reopened a slum that had been barricaded for more than a week to try to...

Study: Novel heart failure drug shows big promise

August 30, 2014 7:22 am | by Marilynn Marchione - AP Chief Medical Writer - Associated Press | Comments

A new study reports one of the biggest potential advances against heart failure in more than a decade — a first-of-a-kind, experimental drug that lowered the chances of death or hospitalization by about 20 percent. Doctors say the Novartis drug — which doesn't have a name yet — seems like one of...

Experimental Ebola drug heals all monkeys in study

August 29, 2014 1:24 pm | by Marilynn Marchione - AP Chief Medical Writer - Associated Press | Comments

An experimental Ebola drug healed all 18 monkeys infected with the deadly virus in a study, boosting hopes that the treatment might help fight the outbreak raging through West Africa — once more of it can be made. The monkeys were given the drug, ZMapp, three to five days after they were infected...

From Bite Site to Brain: How Rabies Virus Hijacks Nerve Cells

August 29, 2014 8:30 am | Comments

New research sheds light on how the rabies virus hijacks the transport system in nerve cells to reach the brain with maximal speed and efficiency.                              

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Genomic Sequencing Reveals Insights into Ebola Outbreak

August 29, 2014 8:30 am | Comments

In response to an ongoing, unprecedented outbreak of Ebola virus disease (EVD) in West Africa, a team of researchers has rapidly sequenced and analyzed more than 99 Ebola virus genomes.                   

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From Nose to Knee: Engineered Cartilage Regenerates Joints

August 29, 2014 8:30 am | Comments

Researchers report that cells taken from the nasal septum are able to adapt to the environment of the knee joint and can thus repair articular cartilage defects. Read more...                     

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CTC Clusters More Likely to Cause Metastasis

August 29, 2014 8:30 am | Comments

Circulating tumor cell clusters- clumps of from two to 50 tumor cells that break off a primary tumor and are carried through the bloodstream- appear to be much more likely to cause metastasis than are single CTCs, according to a new study.    

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