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Egg and Sperm Cells Made From Adult Cells

January 7, 2015 | by Cynthia Fox, Science Writer | Comments

For the first time, scientists have made human sperm and egg precursor cells from human adult skin cells. The work, detailed in a recent paper in Cell, could ultimately change the age at which women stop having children.                                      

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Newly-Found T Memory Stem Cells May Be Key to Gene Therapy

February 27, 2015 10:41 am | by Cynthia Fox, Science Writer | Comments

Genetically engineered T memory stem cells (Tscm) can last more than 12 years in patients’ bodies, and can continually generate appropriate T cell armies for them, says an innovative study looking at two historic clinical trials.     

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Tests Show NFL Brain Damage May Linger, Start Young

February 9, 2015 2:42 pm | by Cynthia Fox, Science Writer | Comments

After the highly charged Super Bowl, two sobering studies emerged. One unveiled an improved molecular imaging technology that verified—and precisely identified—brain damage in some National Football League (NFL) players. The other study revealed that brain damage can be more severe in NFL players who start playing football before age 12.

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Next-Gen Sequencing Maps 'Highly Degraded' DNA

February 6, 2015 12:46 pm | by Sean Alloca, Editor, Forensic Magazine | Comments

Next-generation sequencing (NGS) technology can now profile highly damaged DNA samples that contain 75 percent less base-pair information, compared with previous systems. This is a significant improvement for law enforcement in cases involving missing persons or unidentified human remains.

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Beethoven’s Arrhythmias Likely Inspired Some of His Masterpieces

February 3, 2015 1:54 pm | by Cynthia Fox, Science Writer | Comments

"Washington University cardiologist Zachary Goldberger once made music out of heartbeats. Now, with a Beethoven scholar and a medical historian, he has discovered that three musical compositions that Beethoven created while stressed are arrhythmic in a way mirroring the composer's own probable heart arrhythmias."

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Women Less Welcome Than Men in Fields Demanding Brilliance

January 28, 2015 4:25 pm | by Cynthia Fox, Science Writer | Comments

Women are less welcome than men in fields—including philosophy, physics, math, and music composition—where brilliance is viewed as more important than effort, says a co-ed Princeton University/University of Illinois group in a recent Science.

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President Obama Announces Precision Medicine Initiative

January 22, 2015 12:32 pm | by Ryan Bushey, Associate Editor | Comments

The President briefly mentioned the project during the State of The Union earlier this week.                            

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Blueberries, Avocados and Cocoa Beans May Keep Cardiologists at Bay

January 20, 2015 5:21 pm | by Bioscience Technology Staff | Comments

Times have changed. It used to be that an apple a day kept the doctor away. But three recent studies indicate this mantra could be changed to “a blueberry- avocado-cocoa-bean-smoothie a day” keeps the doctor away—if the doctor is a cardiologist.

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Eradicating Ebola: What Will It Take?

January 20, 2015 10:25 am | by Ryan Bushey, Associate Editor | Comments

These factors may not be enough to finally end the Ebola epidemic in West Africa.                              

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Red-Hot Coverage for Study: “Cold Noses Cause Colds"

January 15, 2015 9:46 am | by Cynthia Fox, Science Writer | Comments

Colds can come from cold noses, according to a high-profile study in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS).                                          

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Five Biotech Startups to Watch in 2015

January 13, 2015 5:02 pm | by Ryan Bushey, Associate Editor | Comments

These companies have an interesting year ahead of them.                                   

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Genome Sequencing of 200-Year-Old Whales May Help Humans Fight Disease

January 13, 2015 9:07 am | by Cynthia Fox, Science Writer | Comments

For the first time, the genome of a mammal longer-lived than man has been sequenced: the bowhead whale, who lives 200-plus years, and gets far less cancer given its size.                                       

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Virtual Reality vs. Real Life: How Brain Neurons Light Up

January 12, 2015 8:56 am | by Cynthia Fox, Science Writer | Comments

Space-mapping brain neurons do not “light up” in scans when exposed to the virtual reality (VR) at work in kids’ video games, the way they do in the “real world.” The neurons—found in the hippocampus—only mirror the “reality” state some 50 percent of the time.

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Pros and Cons: Alcohol Consumption for 10M Years

January 8, 2015 5:16 pm | by Cynthia Fox, Science Writer | Comments

We’ve been imbibing alcohol for ten million years, and the start of that long drinking binge coincided with our descent from the trees. So alcohol may have brought us (along with lots of hangovers), some measure of our humanity.                                               

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Mystery Lingers Over STAP “Acid Bath” Stem Cells

January 7, 2015 10:22 am | by Cynthia Fox, Science Writer | Comments

An investigatory panel hired by the Riken Institute in Toyko, Japan recently issued reports finding that STAP “acid bath” stem cells were, in the main, simply garden-variety embryonic stem (ES) cell lines.                        

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New Clues Why Older Women Are More Susceptible to Breast Cancer

January 5, 2015 3:48 pm | by Skip Derra, Contributing Writer | Comments

The idea that breast cancer becomes more prevalent with age is fairly well established, but the reasons why are still uncertain. Now, scientists from the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory have new insights into why older women are more susceptible to breast cancer.

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