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Don’t Open the Freezer Door: Stability vs. Efficiency in ULT Freezers

November 20, 2014 | by Joe LaPorte, Director of Product Management, Panasonic Healthcare North America | Comments

One day, hopefully sooner rather than later, a truly energy-efficient, ultra-low-temperature (ULT) freezer will reach the market. Unfortunately, for now, no technology exists that provides significant gains in efficiency, without compromising unit stability.

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Streamline Your Sample Preparation

November 21, 2014 10:15 am | by Joanne Ratcliff, PhD, Communications Project Manager, Laboratory Weighing Group, Mettler-Toledo AG | Comments

Why do labs have such difficultly getting a handle on the source of OOS results? Part of the answer can be attributed to the still-common practice of manual volumetric sample preparation. Now, there is a new technique: gravimetric sample preparation.

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Mental Health Problems Increase Cardiovascular Disease Risk

November 19, 2014 2:18 pm | by Cynthia Fox, Science Writer | Comments

People with mental health problems are “significantly” more likely to have stroke or heart disease, according to a study unveiled at a recent Canadian Cardiovascular Congress.                    

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Going Purple: 5 Cutting-edge Breakthroughs in Alzheimer’s Research

November 17, 2014 11:48 am | by Christina Jakubowski, Managing Editor | Comments

November is already halfway over— which means we’re also halfway through National Alzheimer's Disease Awareness Month, which celebrates and raises awareness for the nearly 5.4 million people who have this condition. Read more...

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The Odd Ouster of Sanofi’s Former CEO

November 13, 2014 9:29 am | by Ryan Bushey, Associate Editor | Comments

Chris Viehbacher, the high-flying pharma executive, had his career with Sanofi derailed for a variety of surprising factors. Here's a look at the odd ouster of the former CEO.                    

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Revolutionary New Microscope: Real-time Movies of Molecules

November 12, 2014 8:30 am | by Cynthia Fox, Science Writer | Comments

A new microscope, using a new form of the much-hailed light sheet-based fluorescence microscopy (LSFM), makes visible— via stunning movies— countless biological processes once deemed utterly invisible: sub-cellular activity.       

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Fighting HIV with Stem Cells and Cutting-edge Genetics

November 10, 2014 2:34 pm | by Cynthia Fox, Science Writer | Comments

“Berlin Patient” Timothy Brown was cured of HIV after he received stem cells from a naturally immune patient. His story inspired two companies to try and recreate that natural immunity in HIV patients using stem cells and cutting-edge gene-editing. Now Harvard has joined the race.

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Ebola and Marburg are Millions of Years Old, Not Thousands

November 6, 2014 2:19 pm | by Cynthia Fox, Science Writer | Comments

Ebola and Marburg are 16 to 23 million years old, not thousands of years old as once thought, according to a new study. The research also indicates that while Ebola and Marburg diverged from each other millions of years ago.    

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Special Report: Imagine Science Film Festival

October 31, 2014 3:00 pm | by Cynthia Fox, Science Writer | Comments

One of the enduring images of this year’s Imagine Science Film Festival, held in New York on Oct. 17 to 24, was that of a girl in a black abeyya lugging a giant white telescope up a hill, escaping her cruel Iranian life to lose herself in the stars in the film “Sepideh.” 

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World-First Embryonic Stem Cell Trial for the Heart

October 30, 2014 9:37 am | by Cynthia Fox, Science Writer | Comments

The first embryonic stem (ES) cell trial for severe heart failure is launching now in Paris. The long-awaited trial comes after much preclinical cell work on more than 350 rats, 50 immunodeficient mice and 32 non-human primates.       

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Patient-relevant Preclinical Models Using Image-guided Small Animal Irradiation

October 28, 2014 11:33 am | by Dr. Rajendra Kumari, Chief Scientific Officer, PRECOS Ltd., a Crown Bioscience Company | Comments

Radiotherapy is a primary, adjuvant or neoadjuvant treatment for a number of different cancers, such as glioblastoma, breast, lung and prostate. Image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) is used to reduce the amount of radiation delivered to the normal tissue surrounding the targeted tumor. However, in the preclinical setting, the use of IGRT is less common.

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Imaging and Analysis with Flying Colors: Part One

October 22, 2014 8:30 am | by Mark Clymer, Director of Marketing, Datacolor Inc. | Comments

Researchers are facing increasing demands from colleagues, peers and publishers for process documentation including adequate controls, and for extensive documentation of experimental parameters. Without such consideration, there would be little chance to repeat, or even validate, findings.

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Seeing is Believing: Reproducible Proteomic Studies

October 21, 2014 1:03 pm | by Anton Posch, Senior Scientist, Bio-Rad Laboratories | Comments

For scientists, the field of proteomics has always been a double-edged sword. On one hand, technologies such as 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) capture a vastly improved picture of protein expression in action. But when others try to reproduce the experiment? The findings can suddenly appear blurry.

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Embryonic Stem Cells in Trial for Diabetes

October 16, 2014 11:44 am | by Cynthia Fox, Science Writer | Comments

As San Diego’s ViaCyte was in the midst of launching the first FDA-approved embryonic stem (ES) cell clinical trial for diabetics last week, Boston’s Harvard University reported that cells made from ES cells “cured” diabetic mice.     

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Reversing Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis

October 14, 2014 2:42 pm | by Cynthia Fox, Science Writer | Comments

Lethal fibrosis in lungs of mice with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) can be reversed, say researchers. No drug on the market can do this. But the crew pulled it off, in mice, by temporarily restoring (a mimic of) one of the body’s own anti-fibrosis agents, sharply reduced in IPF: microRNA-29.

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Marburg, Ebola’s Relative, Cured in Monkeys

October 9, 2014 8:30 am | by Cynthia Fox, Science Writer | Comments

An experimental drug saved the lives of 16 of 16 monkeys with the Marburg virus, a killer near-indistinguishable from Ebola, which caused the death of a Ugandan health worker Oct. 6.                  

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