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Spectrophotometer (3237)

June 4, 2004 5:29 am | Articles | Comments

NanoDrop® ND-1000 Spectrophotometer measures small-volume — one microliter — samples. Patented technology eliminates the need for cuvettes and capillaries.

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Stabilizers For Microspheres and Microarrays

June 4, 2004 5:29 am | Articles | Comments

StabilCoat® Plus and StabilGuard® Choice improve the stability of proteins bound to microspheres in solution, protect the activity of proteins while blocking nonspecific binding sites, and prevent aggregation — even after long-term storage.

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Ligation Kit

June 4, 2004 5:29 am | Articles | Comments

Ligate-IT™ Rapid Ligation Kit provides ligation in 5 minutes for cohesive ends and 10 minutes for blunt ends. Competents cells can be transformed immediately, or the ligation reaction may be stored at -20°C for later transformation.

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Protein Crystal Growth Chip

June 4, 2004 5:29 am | Articles | Comments

TOPAZ™ Growth Chip, the first in a new line of chips specialized for generating large, diffraction-quality protein crystals, is important for structural biologists as only half of proteins crystallized by any method turn out to be useful for solving structures.

RNA Amplification for Array Analysis (3231)

June 4, 2004 5:29 am | Articles | Comments

MessageAmp™ II aRNA Amplification Kit incorporates ArrayScript™ M-MLV RT to maximize yields of full length cDNA. MessageAmp II selects and amplifies mRNA from as little as 100 ng of input RNA in a single round of amplification for GeneChip® analysis.

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Direct Detection Of DNA, RNA, Proteins Without Amplification

June 4, 2004 5:29 am | Articles | Comments

The Trilogy™ platform (U.S. Genomics) provides direct detection and quantitation of individual molecules of DNA, RNA and proteins without the need for amplification.

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Personal Archive DNA Storage System

June 4, 2004 5:29 am | Articles | Comments

High speed, room temperature DNA storage and retrieval platform, the GenVault Personal Archive storage system, facilitates on-site management of multiple DNA samples.

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Programmable Pipettor

June 4, 2004 5:29 am | Articles | Comments

The Drummond Pipet-Aid Elite™ facilitates fast, accurate, pipetting and allows easy, comfortable operation. The lightweight Elite features intuitive user-friendly programming functions and "Easy Touch" buttons.

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Army of In Silico Tuberculosis Agents Must Battle to Win Over Experimentalists 6/03/04

June 3, 2004 11:49 am | Articles | Comments

by Catherine Shaffer Treatment for tuberculosis (TB) involves a grueling course of antibiotics that can last a year or more, and there is no effective vaccine. Because the disease manifests differently in humans than in animals, there are also no practical animal models for testing new treatments or vaccines. Now a team of scientists from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Mich., have created a mathematical model of this intractable bacterial illness, and are campaigning for its acceptance among experimentalists.

Chaperone Protein Dissolves Amyloid Plaques 6/02/04

June 2, 2004 8:23 am | Articles | Comments

by Catherine Shaffer Researchers at the Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research, Cambridge, Mass., have reported in Science Express that yeast chaperone Hsp104 regulates the formation of amyloid fibers by Sup35, a translation termination factor. Sup35 converts to a prion, and the prion form aggregates into beta-sheet-rich amyloid fibers.

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Researchers Eye Protein Suspects in Cell Death 06/01/04

June 1, 2004 12:54 pm | Articles | Comments

By Mark Terry Cells have a finite number of divisions, and at each division, chromosome ends, or telomeres, shorten. When the telomeres diminish to a certain length, a number of complex pathways are triggered that halt cell division. In cancer, though, this signaling pathway is disrupted, resulting in unrestrained cell growth.

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Cilia May Provide Targets for Obesity and Other Diseases 5/27/04

May 27, 2004 12:01 pm | Articles | Comments

by Catherine Shaffer Two groups of researchers, working independently and using comparative genomic methods, identified a host of genes involved in the formation of cilia and flagella. Defects in these microtubule-based structures, which humans share with all animals and many unicellular organisms such as the algae Chlamydomonas, are blamed for various disorders, such as poor sperm motility, respiratory disorders, kidney disease, and blindness. The genes identified may offer novel drug targets for these disorders.

Drug Resistance Gene May Be Linked to Alzheimer’s Disease Onset 5/26/04

May 26, 2004 11:58 am | Articles | Comments

by Mark Terry Researchers at the Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, linked Alzheimer's disease (AD) to a protein that helps cancer cells resist anti-tumor drugs. The protein, ABCA2, is associated with resistance to the cancer drug estramustine. It has also been linked to myelination and nervous system development. Involved in cellular transport, ABCA2 has also been associated with cholesterol loading. A recent report suggests there may be a connection between the transport molecule and the mechanisms behind AD.

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Visualization Tool with Gene Expression Levels Planned for MetaCyc Database 5/25/04

May 25, 2004 11:18 am | Articles | Comments

by Jill Taylor With help from a grant from the National Institute of General Medical Sciences, the MetaCyc database, a metabolic pathway database that allows researchers to visualize metabolic pathways from more than 230 organisms, will soon be expanding both its content and the supporting software tool kit to provide additional querying capabilities, and a richer set of visualizations.

Enzyme Singles Out Misfolded Proteins 5/24/04

May 24, 2004 12:06 pm | Articles | Comments

by Elizabeth Tolchin Researchers identified an enzyme that plays a key role in the recognition of misfolded proteins. The finding, say the researchers, may offer a potential target for several degenerative diseases, including cystic fibrosis, diabetes, and Alzheimer's disease.

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